Silk Test Review
SilkTest is a nice tool to work with but the recorded code is somewhat ugly


I have known Borland as a company for a long time yet in the past 10 years have not really worked with any of their tools. A short summary of how they see themselves:

With Silk Test, there’s no need to understand coding so even non-technical people like your business analysts can build tests and get fully involved. This 13.5 release also breaks new ground by working with all the latest browsers, so a single script is all you need.

Well, there are some issues with that statement of course, cause a single script is always doomed to fail in the most horrid ways imaginable, but still, SilkTest is a nice tool to work with.

The good

The reason for looking at SilkTest was because I would like to have a tool now which is future proof for the organisation. In other words, will this tool support further test automation on the end-to-end chains within this large organisation. One really important qualifier for that is solid SAP support. My Proof of concept on SilkTest started off looking into SAP support. The way Silk handles SAP I can simply summarize with one word: good. Out of the box it managed to select the correct SAP instance from the system selection popup, login without issues and after a few attempts execute a bunch of transactions. In other words, I was happily surprised! Most test automation applications I had on the longlist have serious issues in dealing with SAP.

The bad and the ugly

The not so nice side of SilkTest in my opinion is that the recorded code is somewhat ugly, if not really ugly and not very friendly to read and through that probably also to maintain. This however is just a minor nuisance compared to the next issue.

Since the application under test is being served through an RDP tunnel I have no access to the object ID’s. In other words, it is difficult to recognize objects on the application. In SilkTest it is not merely difficult, it is close to impossible. The only runnable way to do so I found is to record the tests based on the screen coordinates and then manually add assertions all over the place. However since SilkTest doesn’t see what it is trying to test, getting the assertions in is really hard. What do you put the assertion on? There is no object to verify.

In other words, this is a disqualifier for SilkTest in this context. In many other contexts however I really enjoy working with Silk, especially when pure code is allowed. Contrary to many other tools Silk Test accepts pure Java rather than some proprietary language.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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