ActiveBatch Workload Automation Overview

ActiveBatch Workload Automation is the #2 ranked solution of our top Managed File Transfer tools. It is rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, and is most often compared to Control-M: ActiveBatch Workload Automation vs Control-M

What is ActiveBatch Workload Automation?

Orchestrate your entire tech stack with ActiveBatch Workload Automation and Enterprise Job Scheduling. Build and centralize end-to-end workflows under a single pane of glass. Seamlessly manage systems, applications, and services across your organization. Eliminate manual workflows with ActiveBatch so you can focus on higher value activities that drive your company forward.

Limitless Endpoints: Use native integrations and our low-code REST API adapter to connect to any server, any application, any service.

Proactive Support Model: 24/7- US-based support and predictive diagnostics.

Low Code Drag-and-Drop GUI: Easily build reliable, customizable, end-to-end processes.

ActiveBatch Workload Automation is also known as ActiveBatch.

ActiveBatch Workload Automation Buyer's Guide

Download the ActiveBatch Workload Automation Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: August 2020

ActiveBatch Workload Automation Customers

Informatica, D&H, ACES, PrimeSource, Sub-Zero Group, SThree, Lamar Advertising, Subway, Xcel Energy, Ignite Technologies, Whataburger, Jyske Bank, Omaha Children's Hospital

ActiveBatch Workload Automation Video

Pricing Advice

What users are saying about ActiveBatch Workload Automation pricing:
  • "ActiveBatch is currently redesigning themselves. In the past, they were a low cost solution for automation. They had a nice tool that was very inexpensive. With their five-year plan, they will be more enhancement-driven, so they're trying to improve their software, customer service, and the way that their customers get information from them. In doing that, they're raising the price of their base system. They changed from one pricing model to another, which has caused some friction between ActiveBatch and us. We're working through that right now with them. That's one of the reasons why we're why we were evaluating other software packages."
  • "If you compare ActiveBatch licensing to Control-M, you're looking at $50,000 as opposed to millions."
  • "The price was fairly in line with other automation tools. I don't think it's exorbitantly expensive, relatively speaking."
  • "I don't think we've ever had a problem with the pricing or licensing. Even the maintenance fees are very much in line. They are not excessive. I think for the support that you get, you get a good value for your money. It's the best value on the market."
  • "It allows for lower operational overhead."

ActiveBatch Workload Automation Reviews

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Richard Black
Systems Architect at a insurance company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Nov 30, 2020
Everything runs automatically from start to finish; we don't have to worry about somebody clicking the wrong button

What is our primary use case?

We are using ActiveBatch to automate as many of our processes as we can, limiting the amount of time operators are running recurring jobs. Included in that is about 99.5 percent of our nightly cycles. We call a mixture of executables: SSIS jobs, SQL queries, and PowerShell scripts. We also call processes in both PeopleSoft and another third-party package software.

Pros and Cons

  • "Since we are no longer waiting for an operator to see that a job is finished, we have changed our daily cycle from running in eight hours down to about five. We had a third shift-operator retire and that position was never refilled."
  • "There are some issues with this version and finding the jobs that it ran. If you're looking at 1,000 different jobs, it shows based on the execution time, not necessarily the run time. So, if there was a constraint waiting, you may be looking for it in the wrong time frame. Plus, with thousands of jobs showing up and the way it pages output jobs, sometimes you end up with multiple pages on the screen, then you have to go through to find the specific job you're looking for. On the opposite side, you can limit the daily activity screen to show only jobs that failed or jobs currently running, which will shrink that back down. However, we have operators who are looking at the whole nightly cycle to make sure everything is there and make sure nothing got blocked or was waiting. Sometimes, they have a hard time finding every item within the list."

What other advice do I have?

I would recommend reaching out to a client who has used it, especially if you have questions. While talking with customer support is great, people who use it on the build have better knowledge of how to use it in the business area. We haven't used any of the APIs directly through ActiveBatch yet. We have started playing around with having our own little outside website which allows our end users to trigger jobs directly within ActiveBatch. But, we have not fully implemented that yet. We have started looking at cloud solutions for bringing Azure sites up and down. We have not implemented that…
Shaun Guthrie
Senior Operations Administrator at Illinois Mutual
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Apr 8, 2020
Provides critical functionality in moving from our mainframe to a distributed environment

What is our primary use case?

ActiveBatch is used for scheduling our nightly batch processes. That is our main use at this point. It includes billing, processing, claims, commission statements, and a lot of reporting. It's all tied into that batch process. We do use the built-in REST call process for nightly printing, coming out of that batch cycle. We distribute the nightly reports out of the batch cycle to different departments using ActiveBatch. It's used for FTP processing every week coming out of the weekly commissions process. The most important part to us is to keep those nightly batch cycles in an easy to read… more »

Pros and Cons

  • "As far as centralization goes it's nice because we can see all these processes that are tied to this larger process. The commissions, FTP processing, the reporting, the file moves to the business users — all that is right there. It's very easy to read. It's easy to tie it together, visually, and see where each of these steps fits into the bigger picture."
  • "The Jobs Library has been a tremendous asset. For the most, that's what we use. There are some outliers, but we pretty much integrate those Jobs Library steps throughout the process, whether it's REST calls, FTP processes, or file copies and moves... That has helped us to build end-to-end workflows."
  • "One thing I've noticed is that navigation can be difficult unless you are familiar with the structure that we have in place. If someone else had to look at our ActiveBatch console and find a job, they might not know where to find it."

What other advice do I have?

Jump in. That's what we did and we're seeing the results. I can't stress enough how much it's allowed us to move forward with this modernization project. Overall, it really has been seamless. There have been a lot of hours on my part, learning the system and researching different processes that I need to put in place for the cycles. But to anyone else, the end result probably appears seamless. It is a lot of work learning it, especially if you have no prior knowledge of enterprise job schedulers and that type of flow. But ActiveBatch provides a wealth of information; their Knowledge Base is…
Learn what your peers think about ActiveBatch Workload Automation. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: August 2020.
448,076 professionals have used our research since 2012.
PeterBirksmith
Senior System Analyst at a insurance company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Nov 30, 2020
Native API calls are very good and very easy, enabling us to tie in to a large range of solutions, including Tableau and ServiceNow

What is our primary use case?

We have roughly 8,000 jobs that run every day and they manage anything from SaaS to Python to PowerShell to batch, Cognos, and Tableau. We run a lot of plans that involve a lot of constraints requiring them to look at other jobs that have to run before they do. Some of these plans are fairly complicated and others are reasonably simple. We also pull information from SharePoint and load that data into Greenplum, which is our main database. SharePoint provides the CSV file and we then move it across to Linux, which is where our main agent is that actually loads into the Greenplum environment… more »

Pros and Cons

  • "The most valuable feature is its stability. We've only had very minor issues and generally they have happened because someone has applied a patch on a Windows operating system and it has caused some grief. We've actually been able to resolve those issues quite quickly with ActiveBatch. In all the time that I've had use of ActiveBatch, it hasn't failed completely once. Uptime is almost 100 percent."
  • "A nice thing to have would be the ability to comfortably pass variables from one job to another. That was one of the things that I found difficult."

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to jump on it straight away. With the ease of installation, the expandability or scalability of the product across multiple servers with different agents, the ability to not only use Windows but Linux as well, and the fact that you can build complex plans that have multiple constraints, multiple types of scheduling, and multiple types of alert mechanisms, it's highly expandable. You're going to have a lot of fun with it. It's highly flexible and easy to use. In terms of what we can do, we still haven't gone to the Nth degree of what we can't do with ActiveBatch. It's…
reviewer1319073
Client Service Manager/Programmer at a tech vendor with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 10Leaderboard
Apr 2, 2020
Automation for workflow triggering and stability have increased our efficiency, reduced delays

What is our primary use case?

In our company we deal with a lot of data processing. Clients will send us extract files that we load into our system so that we can run calculations. And all of that is orchestrated using ActiveBatch automation. To summarize, we have software that we use to calculate values, but we need to receive the files from the client, get them to the right spot, and get them ready for processing. All of those steps are done using the automation tool. The integrations we mainly use it with are FTP and SQL and we use a batch file or a script file to call our internal programs. It does have the ability to… more »

Pros and Cons

  • "One of the most valuable features is the job templates. If we need to create an FTP job, we just drag over the FTP template and fill out the requirements using the variables that ActiveBatch uses. And that makes it reusable. We can create a job once but use it for many different clients."
  • "It does have a little bit of a learning curve because it is fairly complex. You have to learn how it does things. I don't know if it's any worse than any other tool would be, just because of the nature of what it does... the learning curve is the hardest part."

What other advice do I have?

Take the time to get a good feel for how it works. That's the biggest thing. Once you have that, start creating the jobs. I would expect that people will be very satisfied with how well it runs and the flexibility that the tool has. In terms of execution on hybrid machines or across on-prem and cloud systems, it's not applicable for us at this point. All our stuff is hosted. We're not doing anything in the cloud right now, although that may be something that's in our future. But right now, it's just used for servers that we have in our data center. We have a team of about six or seven people…
Bob Olson
Supervisor IT Operations at a insurance company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 10Leaderboard
Apr 2, 2020
Reduction of coding and development costs are substantial

What is our primary use case?

ActiveBatch controls just about everything in our organization. We do server monitoring with our EDI feeds being inbound and outbound. We do Oracle processing with it. It is very comprehensive for what we do and a central point of everything in our organization at this point.

Pros and Cons

  • "The nice thing about ActiveBatch is once we have created a specific job that can be easily be replicated to another job, then minimal changes will have to be made. This makes things nice. Reduction of coding is substantial in a lot of cases. The replication of one job to another is just doing a few minor tweaks and rolling it into production. This decreases our development costs substantially."
  • "There is this back and forth, where ActiveBatch says, "Your Oracle people should be dealing with this," and Oracle people say, "No, we don't know anything about ActiveBatch." Then, it all falls back on me as to what happens. Nobody is taking responsibility. This is the biggest failing for ActiveBatch."

What other advice do I have?

It is a great product. I can't speak enough about it. We haven't found anything that we can't overcome in ActiveBatch. When they put this product out, they thought it out and put a lot of nice stuff into it. There are features we haven't touched yet, even though we have been on it for so many years. We have never really uncovered anything that's a problem. It is a well-thought-out product and one of the best that I've ever worked with. I would rate this product as a 10 out of 10. I really like this product. Think about what you want to automate, then put a process flow in place. For somebody…
Peter MacDonald
Senior IT Architect at a pharma/biotech company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Apr 5, 2020
Makes the environmental passback of an SDLC process seamless

What is our primary use case?

We use it for a variety of different tasks, most of which are related to data management tasks, such as scheduling, processes related to updating business intelligence reporting, or general data management stuff. It's also used for some low level file transfers and mergers in some cases. We use the solution for execution on hybrid machines, across on-prem, and cloud systems. We have code that it is executed on a cloud environment, various Windows and Unix servers. We are on version 11, moving to version 12 later this year.

Pros and Cons

  • "What ActiveBatch allows you to do is develop a more efficient process. It gave me visibility into all my jobs so I could choose which jobs to run in parallel. This is much easier than when I have to try to do it through cron for Windows XP, where you really can't do things in parallel and know what is going on."
  • "I can't get the cleaning up of logs to work consistently. Right now, we are not setup correctly, and maybe it is something that I have not effectively communicated to them."

What other advice do I have?

Right now, we only use the Informatica AI and Informatica PowerCenter. We are looking at a ServiceNow integration. Some of the other ones, like Azure, we don't need right now as we continue to grow it organically. It's more as teams migrate technologies. We want to have an opportunity to have a conversation with them, and say, "Hey, come in and do it this way." We are not using all the features yet. E.g. we don't use any load balancing variables. I would rate the solution as an eight to nine (out of 10).
Mike Scocca
Data Warehouse Operations Analyst at a leisure / travel company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 10
Apr 5, 2020
Map View feature makes it easy to see what the dependencies are; we get a visual, top-down look at what flows are running

What is our primary use case?

We use ActiveBatch to run the data warehouse production batch schedule, which is 24/7. We run, on average, about 200 distinct workflows each day to update the warehouse. And once the warehouse tables are loaded, we trigger our business intelligence reports and our analytics reports. We also use ActiveBatch to run a software tool called iCEDQ for data quality, as well as some Alteryx jobs. Our production servers are in a co-location, and the solution is deployed onsite there.

Pros and Cons

  • "One of the valuable features is the ability to trigger workflows, one after another, based on success, without having to worry about overlapping workflows. The ability to integrate our BI, analytics, and our data quality jobs is also valuable"
  • "The thing I've noticed the most is the Help function. It's very difficult, at times, to find examples of how to do something. The Help function will explain what the tool does, but we're not a Windows shop at the data warehouse. Our data warehouse jobs actually run on Linux servers. Finding things for Linux-based solutions is not as easy as it is for Windows-based solutions. I would like to see more examples, and more non-Windows examples as well, in the Help."

What other advice do I have?

The breakthrough for us was when we were able to take completely different software tools and integrate them into one long flow of data. We have our Informatica jobs which then trigger some PLC to SQL jobs in ActiveBatch, but they also trigger Alteryx jobs, which is its own software tool. It can integrate and execute iCEDQ, which is its own software, as well as Tableau. The ability to trigger those jobs from completely different software tools, in one flow, has saved us a lot of time and a lot of headaches. Don't be afraid to dig in and try things. I said one of the weaknesses is the Help, but…
Georg Johansen
Operations Manager at Statkraft AS
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Apr 7, 2020
Our business users are able to set up and maintain their own jobs

What is our primary use case?

Most of the jobs are for the automation of processes, but we also use it for IT operations, including monitoring. We execute over 20,000 jobs daily. It's moving data files and doing a lot of calculations in hydrology and the like. The business users are maintaining their own jobs, setting them up, configuring, and maintaining them. They only contact us, in IT, if there are any problems. ActiveBatch is completely on-prem but the rest of our organization has many different kinds of infrastructure and locations, both in the cloud and in 16 countries. We have about 4,000 employees.

Pros and Cons

  • "We use the main job-scheduling feature. It's the only thing we use in the tool. That's the reason we are using the tool: to reduce costs by replacing manual tasks with automated tasks and to perform regular, repetitive tasks in a more reliable way."
  • "It could be easier to provide dashboards on how many jobs are running at the same time; more monitoring."

What other advice do I have?

Start with a simple, small version and try some simple tasks to see how effective it is. Using ActiveBatch I have learned that the potential for reducing costs using an automation tool is huge, and that when the business becomes aware of it they really embrace the product.
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