Automation Anywhere (AA) Scalability

William "Sonny" Kocak
Sr. RPA Developer at a financial services firm with 5,001-10,000 employees
The scalability is limited more by our money and our hardware than anything. The scalability really depends on how much RAM and how much network bandwidth we can do, how many servers we can apply. I know we can just keep adding to the cluster and I know clients could keep popping up. Since we're at the forefront of this, it has not been an issue. However, I do know that, within a year, when we start having multiple clients running and we have multiple developers in there, I may have a different response. But, again, I think we would just have to add more Control Room servers and more resources to the servers. We haven't hit a scalability limit issue yet. View full review »
AutoMan9843
Automation Manager - Nordic at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
The scalability is good. I think we haven't really used the Bot Farm product yet, but that looks very exciting. We're planning on moving the infrastructure into the cloud and it's then a very interesting prospect to be able to scale up from 100 bots to 1,000 bots with just the click of a button. To my knowledge, it's probably the most scalable RPA software out there. We haven't really met any major challenges when it comes to scaling up, other than our own computers. But that's an in-house problem, not an Automation Anywhere problem. I've talked to people using other RPA vendors and they have said they face some major issues once they pass 40 automated processes, but we haven't really faced those kinds of challenges. It has been running smoothly. It's very scalable and it's easy to have control. There is a good audit log in the Control Room. And there is the ability to create your own roles and have strict, role-based access control where you say: This role is able to run this bot on this machine but it's not able to run another bot on the same machine. That's good from a security standpoint. View full review »
Sharad Soni
Director Of Innovation at Quantum AI
I'm not yet happy with the scalability of Automation Anywhere. Scalability is good up to about 100 bots. Beyond that, I need to spread it into multiple sites, which means there is additional licensing cost. View full review »
ShripadMhaddalkar
Director of Operations at XLNC Technologies
Other tools tend to give me exceptions when I am scaling them on the cloud. While the infrastructure might be available, systems won't be able to talk to each other. The codes tend to miss paths, and sometimes codes are not getting applied in the application. However, with Automation Anywhere, we haven't seen any such issues until now, wherein large scale developments are being found to be unstable. The good thing about Automation Anywhere is the website has a detailed architecture which talks about having a load balancer and how you can scale up. Currently, I have been working with clients in the US and Dubai through remote support. I have been developing bots remotely where I have been able to access their virtual machines. The virtual machines are separate for creators and runners. I have around six creators on virtual machines, which is good enough to start off. There are around 25 runners which are deployed on 25 VMs. This is in US. That's how we are operating them, and it's the largest setup that we work on. In India, clients start small. They start with a starter pack, which is only allowed to be issued by an implementation partner. If you go onto the Automation Anywhere website, there is nothing called a starter pack. So, organizations will tend to start small with a starter pack, which may come in a bundle of two or three creators, one runner, and one controller. They want to test how it is functions in their organization. If they can pick up low hanging fruit, which means if they're picking processes which are smaller but high in volume, then they will have higher ROI. Then, these organizations tend to jump onto an enterprise level deployment in a maximum of six months. That is the trend that we have seen. However, the moment the client starts going big and is not able to get the right ROI in place, that's where they tend to start dropping the ball. Then, they start looking for another RPA software or decide RPA is not for them. View full review »
Jeff Hagee
BPM Analyst at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
The scalability is good. It is very easy to scale. It doesn't take us hardly any time at all if we need to spin up a new Control Room or Bot Runner. The slowest part is probably on our end, getting the hardware. It took us two years to scale from pilot to the number of bots that we are currently using. I wasn't involved in the early days of the PoC. I came into the group a little later after that, but now, we use a federated model. We were sort of the center of excellence for it, working with our business partners. In a number of cases, our business partners are now developing their own bots. We have developed some, where the business partners didn't have much of an interest to doing the development. They wanted to be involved in the creation, so they understood it, but they didn't want to do any of the coding in the background, so we do it for them. We do all the production support. I like to go by actual executions, not number of bots, because we have some bots that need to be executed multiple times during the day. Last time I looked, we were well over a 100 different executions in a week. View full review »
ProcessAb41f
Process Artichect at a media company with 5,001-10,000 employees
The product is definitely scalable. A lot of it will depend solely on the architecture of the organization who is implementing it. If you are using on-premise servers, it is much harder to scale up versus if you are using cloud-based architecture. Automation Anywhere provides the tools and expertise to make it scalable. At the previous company that I was with, we had a pilot in September 2017 with approximately 20 bots. Then, in production, it took nine to ten months. With the organization that I'm currently with their process took a little longer, but they were standing up their COE initially. So, they went from pilot to about 30 bots in production. This took roughly a year and a half to two years. With regards to process, there is a lot involved. If you want to have a successful RPA and Automation Anywhere implementation at the ground level, you need to lay the foundation and the framework. Therefore, you need to build your center of excellence, and make sure you have dedicated people who will focus on whatever their role is: People related to support, governance, development, architecture, oversight (who will work with your security teams to get your reviews done), and IT personnel (who will provision servers and licenses and do control room administration). There is a lot involved to take it from inception to a successful program. View full review »
vphead09866
Vice President & Head of HR - L&T Defence at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Scalability-wise, they have increased it a lot, based on the clustering method. As a technical architect, I'm going with always-on production and data centers. That means that if any data center goes down - there is a natural disaster or something else that happens - how do you make it such that you can bring up another data center? I'm coming up with a design for that based on the latest version, version 11. View full review »
SeniorDi7ec0
Senior Director, Digital Transformation at a financial services firm with 501-1,000 employees
We're not really there yet, in terms of scaling, but based on the high-availability issue, right now I'm not too confident. From everything I've heard, though, it seems like people are running hundreds of processes on a Control Room, but we haven't really done enough to know about scalability. View full review »
Brian Walling
Global IT Director at a logistics company with 501-1,000 employees
We didn't have to scale too far, so we didn't experience its scalability. View full review »
Kyoichi Haida
GM Business Process Planning Dept at a insurance company with 10,001+ employees
It is highly scalable. At the time of implementing this solution, we thought that the scaling might be challenging if the setup process took a lot of time. However, it turned out to be very scalable because, by segmenting, it can also be applied to other new business processes. In addition, it can be done without engineers or system engineers. It does not need to be developed, but we do need to set it up based on rules. The cost for scalability is much cheaper than developing a new system. View full review »
Prateek Kapoor
Global Intelligent Automation & Transformation Leader at a tech company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Scaling is very easy. We were able to scale it up very easily. For 2018, we thought of doing eight projects, but we completed 25. We're definitely planning to scale up, but scaling up does not depend on Automation Anywhere. It actually depends on our organization's strategic plan, and how fast we want to do it. As an organization, we want to be a tortoise in the journey, rather than being a hare. We want to have a consistent pace of implementation. Initially, we were like the hare and did some extra implementations, but now we are trying to match it up with the pace of the organization. Sometimes, too big a change can rock the boat, which we don't want to do. But equally, we were able to demonstrate that this application can do wonders for the organization, help us to digitally transform the way we're working, and introduce a new way of working to any organization. Now, humans have started adopting bots as their new team members. View full review »
ITAnalys692c
IT Analyst at a manufacturing company with 501-1,000 employees
From the current setup that we have, I'm not sure how much we can scale up. We had an initial PoC and our first go-live was less than a year ago, so we haven't had those discussions on what it would take to either increase by one or two servers or 20 servers, or what that would look like. View full review »
Engineer0ae1
Engineer at a healthcare company with 10,001+ employees
To scale from pilot to the number of bots we're currently using went pretty quickly. I have talked to other teammates who are working on Automation Anywhere and developing the bots. I've heard really good feedback on that. It's within weeks, and sometimes days, depending on the complexity. Doing a simple password reset went really fast. If they are doing something on an OTC process or a P2P process or integrating with SAP, it will be a long process. First, you have to get approval from all the business owners and understand the process. That takes time. But the technical aspect - once you have everything in place and you know what you are going to do - the coding itself, is pretty fast. View full review »
Software66b3
Software Engineer at The Travelers Companies, Inc.
Scaling has gone remarkably well too, the ability to literally just spin up another bot. We have a collection and we'll add a couple more and no big deal happens to the scheduler. It has worked well. To scale from pilot to the number of bots we’re currently using has taken about two years. We did a lot of experimenting before we committed to it, but once we got through a couple of those experimentation projects, we were able to form a team, figure out exactly what we were going to have to accomplish from a business point of view, and dive in. After those couple of pilots, it took about a year from when we initially startied playing with it. There was a little bit of getting our feet wet, feeling comfortable with it. But now, we have several teams and it's working great. View full review »
SeniorCo515c
Senior Consultant at a financial services firm with 501-1,000 employees
The scalability is fine. You can create small, repeatable tasks. You can expand through different bots. So, you don't have to recreate the same stuff. Automation Anywhere provides the facility so you can reuse components to make a scalable solution. We are improving scalability on a daily basis, as RPA is new to us. Our code is now more scalable and reusable than we developed our basic structure. Going forward, if we have to create a new bot with any given scenario, it will take 20 to 40 percent less time to create. This is because we have already made the scalable, reusable components. View full review »
Rajeev Mall
Finance Head of BSO Senior Group Division at a manufacturing company with 10,001+ employees
If you ask me, my personal belief is you can’t even begin to imagine what you can do. You can imagine, but you are limited by your own imagination and thinking, so you can go exponentially. View full review »
Pratyush Kumar
Delivery Manager, Robotics Process Automation at a retailer with 10,001+ employees
We are still small from a robotics implementation standpoint. We are just about 20 bots right now with no issues. If we scale up to 500 bots, I am not sure how the infrastructure and systems will behave, but I have had a good experience from a scalability standpoint on the tool so far. I have a team of about 25 people with six people in support with the rest in development. At any given time, we have more than 50 people running Automation Anywhere. View full review »
ITProjec26f6
IT Project Lead at a financial services firm with 51-200 employees
Our first business unit who started their journey two years ago went from one bot initially to about 55 over a two-year period. Typically, they were averaging a new bot about every two to three weeks. That was with a team of five to six people sort of dedicated to the process. We have had consistent growth with our numbers over that time. View full review »
RpaDevel0b28
RPA Developer at a consultancy with 1,001-5,000 employees
What we're trying to figure out right now is how to scale this. That's where the hardware comes in. For the most part, scaling with the application is more a matter of building the infrastructure around it. To scale from pilot to the point where we are now, where we're developing three or four bots every two weeks, it took us six months. A lot of that was trial and error, creating our standards, and hiring developers to whom we could pass the projects. View full review »
Ronaldo Firmo
Automation COE Manager at a mining and metals company with 10,001+ employees
Scalability is associated to the number of bot runners purchased. More bot runners can be purchased at any time depending on how the demand grows, and AA offers the ability to process bots in a platform called bot farm. View full review »
Architec82e8
Architecht at a insurance company with 1,001-5,000 employees
The scalability is good. We started with very few bots and it was quite scalable. We now have about ten Bot Runners. View full review »
VpIsGlob37e5
VP IS Global Development at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
We're still pretty small, so we haven't had a need to scale out too much. We have seen the roadmap for scaling out, and it doesn't look to be too difficult. So, we should& have a problem with it. We have only had the tool for about eight months. From start to finish, we have put over a dozen bots in place, some of which are highly complex and took a lot of weeks to properly deploy. View full review »
Buisness39d3
Senior Manager at a tech vendor with 10,001+ employees
From pilot to production, we scaled our last bot in about nine weeks. It was a very interesting process because the building deployment can be done pretty quickly, but if you don't narrow down the scope early, you can face a lot of challenges. I don't think this necessarily has to do with the platform. It is more about understanding and narrowing down your scope from the beginning. It's okay to add more functionality later, but that adds delay to your overall timeline. However, being that it's very easy to configure the bot and add components to it, this is one of the benefits of building with Automation Anywhere. You can make changes pretty quickly. With everything, you will have to be careful and not get caught up always making changes. You have to really narrow the scope down quickly and build it in very small components. Don't build everything end-to-end. Break down your processes, as much as possible, and deploy as little functionality as possible. This makes it way more easy to manage. It is also a much better way to build a bot. View full review »
reviewer949524
Program Manager at a manufacturing company with 10,001+ employees
We are just in the path. This year, we are trying to do ten times more than last year. We are trying to do about 100 automated processes this year. I have confidence that the solution is able to cater our needs. View full review »
Kunal Goel
Digital Expert at a consultancy with 10,001+ employees
Scalability is good. It's one of the better ones. View full review »
SeniorIT8b1c
Senior IT Design Analyst at a retailer with 1,001-5,000 employees
The company started the pilot a year and a half ago. That phase was probably six or seven months. Then, it took a little over a year to get it up and running. We also did an upgrade to the newest version, and that took some time. Overall, it took about a year to scale up our bots. View full review »
FounderC1f7e
Founder CEO at Predikly
In terms of scalability, we haven't been in a situation where it has been a challenge for us. We've been able to scale to what we need. Having said that, we haven't deployed thousands of bots yet, but for the bots we have done we've been doing great. To scale from pilot to the number of bots we're currently using, took us between eight and 12 weeks. View full review »
Technica6e74
Technical Lead at a manufacturing company with 10,001+ employees
We intentionally took a long time to scale up to our current number of bots because we focused on using large processes, instead of small ones. For us to grow to scale, it took us about a year and a half. However, we have been focusing on processes with tens of FTEs per year, instead of about processes that are one to two hours per day. View full review »
Kumar Animesh
Senior Technical Consultant at Fujitsu India
The scalability is good. View full review »
Automati8812
Automation Architect at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
We face issues when we need to increase volumes. Currently, it is failing for some reason, and we don't know the reason. It fails or stops, then we need to see what is going on. We have to fix that, then our developers need to rerun it. These are mostly practical challenges for our team who uses it on daily basis. View full review »
ChiefArc74eb
Chief Architect at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
The initial pilot was for two processes, which took us about four months. Then, the other processes were more extensive, so that took longer, only because we needed to do more with the process documentation, not so much in the bot creation. It just depends upon the complexity of the process, but also how well-documented your processes are. View full review »
Masaru Ogawa
Assistant to GM, IT & Business Transformation Division at a manufacturing company with 10,001+ employees
The capabilities for developing similar tasks are there and it's relatively easy to do. However, to accomplish that we’d need a group of IT engineers. That’s where we are not up to par. View full review »
SeniorMa8f54
Senior Manager IT Department / Corporate IT Planning at a tech vendor with 201-500 employees
It is very scalable. The structure is a client server, so we can expand the environment quickly, if needed. View full review »
Eric Dalton
Business Apps at New Jersey Resources Corporation
We are only running three bots, so we haven't had to worry about scalability yet. We built the tool to handle about 30 bots. So far, we haven't had any problems with scalability. It took about six months to scale from the pilot to the number of bots that we are currently using, but the majority of those months were wasted on our upgrade issue. View full review »
Directorb51d
Director Solution Architect at a financial services firm with 5,001-10,000 employees
We started out with three production bots last year. From the time that we were deploying them into production to being able to use them in a production mode, it took somewhere between four to six months. View full review »
Rahul Sualy
Director at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Once we got the tool going and were fairly familiar with it, we were able to scale the solution. Our developers love it. It is fairly simple to use. Sometimes, we are able to even bring people on fairly quickly, like interns, and have them use the software. Then, we are able to see some real benefit out of it fairly quickly. At pilot, we had around four bots. Today, we have 85 bots, and that is over 12 to 13 months. View full review »
Asif Hussain
Senior Project Manager / RPA Architect at Royal Cyber Inc.
Manually, I have worked on adding/scaling bots, but I need to work on cloud availability, possibly discussing scaling with cloud providers, like AWS. For different processes, the scaling time period is different. For some processes, we could develop bots in two weeks, then go to production with one or two bots. For other processes, it could take three months or more. It varies based on the process. View full review »
Luis Romero
CIO at Binary Technologies Inc
We have worked on several different projects, so far. From prototypes to production, on average, scaling our bots takes somewhere from three to six weeks. View full review »
Bruno Rocha
Workforce Coordinator at a mining and metals company with 10,001+ employees
It took us three months to scale from pilot to the number of bots that we are currently using. We started by experimenting with a very low number on the license: two Bot Runners and five Bot Creators. Now, we have 60 Bot Runners and 35 Bot Creators. We are improving as we are seeing new opportunities. View full review »
ITDirect5fd0
IT Director at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
The architecture allows us to scale. We are still working to get it to a right level of scalability for our environment. View full review »
Rpa5a1d
Tech Lead at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
As we have a small number of bits in production on version 10.5.4, we found it easy to scale. Version 11 will provide a load balancer, making it easier for us to run a pool of VMs to complete a task. We mostly use it for operations right now. We are looking at possible IT RPA use cases. View full review »
Solution1ddf
Solution Manager at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
I would like to see improvement in its scalability. While workload management is a nice feature, from a practical usage and client usage standpoint, we would like to see improvement. We usually start a pilot automation with a single Bot Runner. Then, based on volume, we will increase it to two. Afterwards, we'll increase exponentially from there based on volume. View full review »
SeniorAsced7
Senior Associate, IT at a financial services firm with 201-500 employees
The scalability is pretty easy. It is pretty intuitive for any IT person to scale their environment. View full review »
RpaDevel3794
RPA Developer at Verizon Communications
We have built many bots. It is good to use the best practices when developing them. For example, we add logs and error handling to each bot, so if it is not working, then we can see why. This helps our developers a lot. It took us two to three months to scale up from our pilot to the number of bots that we are currently using. What took time was our business people needed to be educated on bots and their capabilities. View full review »
SeniorVi633f
Senior Vice President and Digital Leader at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
The time it takes to scale bots depends process to process, how complex the process is and if you're talking about a specific process. It may takes anywhere from around three weeks to 15 weeks, depending upon the complexities, the number of bots which we are deploying, and the problem these bots are solving. View full review »
Operatiobf07
Operations Leader at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
It is definitely scalable. What we found worked for us to make it scalable was it has to be programmed by an architect, as opposed to letting it just be in the hands of the masses trying to solve it. This has been our approach. It took us eight months to a year to scale from zero bots to 100. View full review »
ManagerA8e80
Manager, Administrator of Strategy Team at a software R&D company with 51-200 employees
We only have four machines for the development and actual work. Once we are done with the development, we will implement it in groups. At this point, we don’t know about its scalability yet. View full review »
RpaBusin938c
RPA Business Lead at World Bank
It provides high scalability. You can implement this across any industry, any sector. It took us about one year to scale from pilot to the number of bots we are currently using. View full review »
Will Haskell
Supervisor at a energy/utilities company with 5,001-10,000 employees
It scales pretty well as long as you have enough developers to scale it with you. We can scale the bots in about a year. When we started, we went from a pilot of about 14 bots, which all got stripped away. Then, we ended up implementing 30 different bots about a year later. View full review »
ChiefITA7b2f
Chief IT Architect at a consultancy with 10,001+ employees
It took one to one and a years to scale to our current number of bots. View full review »
ManagerBf895
Manager, Business Process Integration at a manufacturing company with 501-1,000 employees
Our first bot took ten weeks to create. It took six months to create the number of bots that we are currently using. View full review »
Jian Chen
Systems Engineer at a insurance company with 1,001-5,000 employees
We went through the documentation, it looks pretty easy to scale. It took six months to scale from pilot to our current number of bots. View full review »
Jeffery Gant
IT Business Partner at Lyondell Basel Industries
We have three bots in production. We are currently working on scaling up to 30 bots. View full review »
SeniorMada6d
Senior Manager Development at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
The scalability is very good. I haven't had any issues. From pilot to our current number of bots, it took about two months. View full review »
Configur7384
Configuration Specialist at a energy/utilities company with 1,001-5,000 employees
We started with zero bots. In our first cycle, we developed around eight bots. In our second cycle, we created around five or six bots. Now, we are on our third bot cycle. View full review »
ProcessI4690
Process Improvement Manager at a comms service provider with 10,001+ employees
Scaling is a big job, but it is completely scalable. A whole new team/department needs to be created in order to develop and monitor robotic process automation. View full review »
Infrastr17d7
Infrastructure Manager at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
It is a powerful tool for scaling that sometimes makes the process seamless. It took one year to scale to the amount of bots that we are currently using. View full review »
Anantha Kancherla
AVP Solutions at CIGNEX Datamatics
We are scaling up, but I don't think that we are scaling correctly. View full review »
RpaDevel40d8
RPA Developer at Verizon Communications
The scalability is good. View full review »
Alexandre Dusseault
Technical Lead at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
With our current version, we are experiencing issues with the access of the Control Room. Therefore, at the moment, we cannot really scale. View full review »
Sreeraj Nadarajan
Service Intergration Expert at a pharma/biotech company with 10,001+ employees
It took us eight months to scale to our current number of bots. View full review »
SeniorGrb42e
Senior Group Manager at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Our division took a couple of months to scale up our bots, when we were expecting it to take weeks. However, what we did was fairly complicated. View full review »
RoboticPe593
Robotic Process Automation Manager at Imerys
It is very scalable. We're in the process of scaling currently. We started off with two pilot automations, then we needed an engagement strategy to get people excited about it and get their ideas. Then, we needed to prioritize those ideas and go deeper into the processes. But, we plan to start on the next phase soon. View full review »
Vinay Sridhar
IT Team Lead at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
The product is scalable. View full review »
ProductM6aa8
Product Manager at a university with 5,001-10,000 employees
The product can scale. It took us six months to scale to our current number of bots. View full review »
Software0742
Software Developer at a insurance company with 10,001+ employees
We started with a complex process, so it has taken us over a year to scale our bots. View full review »
Technica28f7
Application Lead at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
It took a few months for us to scale from pilot to the number of bots that we are currently using. View full review »
Director2299
Director at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
It took one month to scale to the amount of bots which we are currently using. View full review »
André Scher
CEO at Auctus
While it depends on the customer, it generally takes about two to two and a half months to scale up bots for production. View full review »
Ajay Jeyaraman
Advisory at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
Scalability has been a pain point. The scalability is there, but there are ongoing operational issues with it. View full review »
Krishna Kishore Paraselli
Senior Architect at a comms service provider with 10,001+ employees
It is very scalable. View full review »
Vaibhav Jain
Senior Tech Advisor at Ernst & Young
It is pretty scalable, but it does depend on how you develop the bot. View full review »
Juan Polania
Specialist at Bancolombia
We are working on scaling it now. We use it with more than 17 applications. So, we work it on a very large scale. View full review »
SupplyChe0e0
Supply Chain Manager at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
The stability has been good, so far. It took us four months to scale up to our current number of bots. View full review »
Executivf417
Executive Director at a tech services company with 5,001-10,000 employees
The product is scalable. View full review »
Continuo8ac2
Continuous Improvement Manager at a energy/utilities company with 10,001+ employees
The scalability is good. It took us a year and a half to scale from our pilot to the current number of bots that we have. View full review »

Sign Up with Email