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Eggplant Manager OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Eggplant Manager is #9 ranked solution in top Quality Management Tools. IT Central Station users give Eggplant Manager an average rating of 10 out of 10. Eggplant Manager is most commonly compared to TFS: Eggplant Manager vs TFS. The top industry researching this solution is Computer Software Company, accounting for 46% of all views.
What is Eggplant Manager?
eggPlant Manager helps you to manage your test execution and test environment. eggPlant Manager is a web-based test management tool that allows you to define test runs, schedule test executions, easily manage your systems and devices-under-test, manage and co-ordinate multiple instances of eggPlant Functional, and analyze aggregated results. eggPlant Manager helps you set up a continuous integration and test quickly and reliably.

Eggplant Manager is also known as TestPlant eggPlant Manager.

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Automation Software Development Analyst 3 at a aerospace/defense firm with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 20
Probably the best GUI automation tool out there

Pros and Cons

  • "We did see a massive return on investment from using Eggplant."
  • "They need to update the Linux. I think it's kind of an outdated Java Swing application."

What is our primary use case?

I manage a team of testers. It's more of a software team, but I manage a team of testers that utilizes Eggplant every day. The reason we picked Eggplant was because the testers don't have a lot of coding experience.

Eggplant Functional is a GUI automation tool. We only use it for GUI automation. The applications that we use it for are mainly desktop applications.

It is not a test management tool, it's not like Jazz or QF-Test, it's a GUI automation tool. So when you look at Facebook or LinkedIn, that is the UI, the user interface. It's buttons, it's scroll downs, it's menus, it's drop downs, it's how a user navigates through the application. That's the only thing we use it for - GUI automation. It is not a test management tool. Test management tools are like Jazz.

It's on-prem. It has to be for our job because we do a lot of classified stuff.

What is most valuable?

The features that I have found most valuable are that it has a spot for everything. I know developers really utilize its OCR function. It needs to be tuned a little bit more, but as an all-around tool, it's probably the best GUI automation tool out there. The reason for that is because of its recognition, it's been around for a while and also for what it can do. It can do almost anything you want it to do.

We've reduced testing time by about 70%. We had a regression suite that took the team literally two and a half weeks to get through. And once all the tests were automated, it literally takes us 16 hours to run through all the tests.

It's more than 70%. But the reason why I say 70% is that not all the tests could be run from beginning to end. There are some parts of the application that we had to kick off separately. But mostly all the automation could run within 24 hours, including all your regression. There are still tests where our users have to go out and manually test to make it 70%. But for the most part, we took a two and a half week process and we cut it down to almost two days of automation if kicked off Monday night. So it's pretty awesome.

The one team that I had integrated the solution on does not even need a tester. That's what Eggplant is, Eggplant is never sick, it runs all the time. It's never late. It is probably one of the best tools on the market for GUI automation.

What needs improvement?

In terms of what could be improved, I would love to be able to take the font of the application that the team is working in and upload it or import it into Eggplant Functional, so that the OCR is more accurate when it comes to that type of font. Because sometimes when you get into legacy applications where the fonts get a little wonky, they look really old, so a 1 could get mistaken for just an L. So I would love to have that part where it could read fonts that you import into it a lot easier for the OCR.

Additionally, there is some stuff around images they need to tighten up. Sometimes it has a hard time finding fuzzy images. I couldn't really tell you what they need to brush up on with the images. But for the most part, it's on point. I would like the company to have a dummy desktop application that they could send or download from the site that you could run Functional against. One of the biggest hurdles we had to go over was when we got Functional and installed it - what do we use it against? We did not really have an application. So we had to just write automation against the calculator or write automation against Notepad or Microsoft Excel.

It was kind of lost on some people. They would say, "Well, this is stupid. I actually want to see this being utilized against something that looks like an application." So I wish the company would come up with a dummy desktop application, something that doesn't require admin privileges. Just a little lightweight MSI file or RPM that you could put onto the machine that just has weird dropdowns or windows or buttons that you can click on just to test stuff against them. Something like that would be good.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's stable. I'm serious. It's very stable. Now on the Linux side, it gets a little... I think they need to update the Linux. I think it's kind of an outdated Java Swing application, it almost gives you the impression that the application was written in Java Swing. Maybe they need to update the GUI part for JavaFX. There are some times when you're working with multiple sets and clicking in and out of it and you go to click in the text box and it gives you that straight line that kind of looks like a weird "I," because it's meant for you to put that in between letters - well it never switches off of that. So that becomes your mouse curser when you're working in Functional and it gets kind of lost.

So there is some wonky stuff around the Linux side of Functional. The little Eggy box in the corner doesn't always work when you double click on the the Eggy icon and Functional never really pops up. That's because there's another application that is actually sitting on top of it so it won't bring it to the front because something is in front of it. I've already sent it off to Eggplant, but they've got some wonky stuff with the Linux side. And unfortunately, with the company I work with, we do everything with Linux. But for the most part, it's very stable. We don't run into issues with memory leaks or it not loading or taking too much resources or something like that. It is pretty on point.

I would say it's the dog's bollocks when it comes to that. It's awesome.

There has been a question in my mind about the log files, but in the time that I've been working with Eggplant, I've never seen the log files ever get bloated or out of sort, never been an issue. So maintenance is not an issue. That's the only thing I could think of that you would run into, but I have not. It's a pretty sturdy application. They've got it figured out. The company has been around for 15 plus years. I think they have the maintenance side of things down. And they recently merged with Keysight. And Keysight will also probably bring stuff in that will add to it. Like I said, the application is pretty top shelf, it works.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

My impressions of the scalability are that it is top shelf.

I can tell you how many people that I have integrated it with in the company, I would say thousands. Our company is worldwide, and Eggplant is used throughout the company and in multiple facets. The team that I'm currently working with has 14 testers right there. And if you throw the devs in, that's 20 devs that are using it. Then you're looking at 34, not counting the previous team of 10, so that's 44. The team before that was five. Let's round it up to 50 people that I've interacted with just on that alone. But Eggplant is used across the company, so I'd have to say a thousand plus. You could talk to Keysight and ask them how many people use it at Northrop Grumman and they could give you a number.

We have plans to increase the usage. I'll probably integrate it into the next team I go to. I'm kind of the unofficial spokesman slash salesman for Eggplant. That's my job, basically working in test automation. I'm an automation engineer and it's phenomenal for the turnover rate that you can turnover tests with. If the next team I go to are all developers and they brought me in to integrate a GUI automation solution, and the team doesn't have a lot of money, then maybe we'd have to go with a cheaper solution. But I've been fortunate to land on teams where they have the budget for that. Let's be honest, Eggplant isn't cheap.

How are customer service and technical support?

It is different in terms of government contracting versus the private sector. They have reps for private sector versus government contracting. And the reps that I've always worked with for the government that have been assigned to our company have been on point, they're great. Now the ones that just came on who replaced the previous ones are not as good as the previous ones, but they'll get there. They're new. You don't ever judge somebody's beginning with somebody else's end. So honestly, the tech support is still top shelf.

It would be a 9.5. 9.8 out of 10.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

In terms of Eggplant Manager, I do and I don't have experience with it. I have never used it but I know how to use it. I know what it is. But a lot of the teams at my company utilized Manager in a different way. They utilize a manager type of Eggplant in a different way. They use Jenkins to do the backend stuff, like the overnight running of tests. Manager schedules my tests to run at this time of night against an application. I've told them the sophomore teams I've been on about Manager and they say they already have a tool that does that and they can just run it from Jenkins. So really, the only part of Eggplant that I've ever really used is Functional, but I am aware of how DIA and Manager work. It would be cool to have those tools for a team that doesn't have Jenkins set up to see how they would want to use it, if they're really limited. It is a nice tool, but you're going to end up paying for it.

How was the initial setup?

In terms of initial setup, unfortunately my deployment process was all Linux based. So I actually had to reach out to the network admins to set up the environments for it. But the deployment process getting it installed was not a big deal. We did have to jump through hoops to get it connected to the SUT, which is where your System Under Test sits.

It took a day. But that was with someone who wasn't familiar with VNC and wasn't quite sure how to set it up. If you had a network admin that knew what he was doing, it'd probably take the same amount of time as the Windows. It's just changing a couple things, setting a configuration file and you'd be off and running.

What about the implementation team?

Most of the teams that I have integrated it on are only interested in the Functional part, because they only want the automation solution for the GUI. We never really scratched the surface on the DIA or the Manager part of Eggplant. I never really worked with a web team that had to utilize Eggplant Performance, mostly just Functional. The integration of it, the Windows end of it, is actually super easy. When you get into the Linux end, when you have to set up VNC, you have to have someone who is knowledgeable of how to run, create, and set up VNC connections and stuff like that. It is way more technical on the Linux side. But the RDP end is actually really good, it's really easy. I think if you have a Windows environment and you're connecting to a set that is on a Windows environment, and we lived in a perfect world, that install would only took a minute. You could be up and running within two minutes.

What was our ROI?

We did see a massive return on investment from using Eggplant. The previous team puffed their chest that they don't have to hire a tester on staff. So that's 60,000, 75,000 easily in their pocket that they can go spend on something else. And some teams have three or four testers. So you have Eggplant, which at our company is basically $2,500 a pop for key, because we get it so cheaply because there are so many out there. They only needed five licenses on the team. It's not hard to do the math on five times 2,500 versus five times 75,000. You're making money all day long with that. So ROI is huge because it replaces a tester. It frees up time for other things, so it's a massive ROI.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Eggplant is expensive. What makes it cheap for us is that in the company where I work, the more people that use it, the cheaper the licenses get. So it's kind of a deal in a way, the more you buy, the cheaper they are.

To put it in perspective, if we think about it, their support is actually wrapped into the cost. So you can call and talk to them any time of day and they aren't going to send you a bill for it. Whereas, Katalon or QF-test, or SmartBear, like TestComplete, will send you a bill. They'll send you a bill at the end of the week. You call them up for a support issue, they'll bill you. But their install and product are pretty cheap. Katalon, TestComplete and QF-test are cheap tools, but their support doesn't come cheap, they'll stick you on it.

Let's just put it into perspective. We had a team that didn't go through our company to get the licenses. They went through Eggplant to purchase the license and they purchased Manager as well. Functional for one year is $16,000. I don't know what that is in Quid or Pounds, but it's a lot. So now they added Manager and all that, and I think for one or two licenses with DIA and Manager, it ended up being $45,000 for two licenses, for a year.

What other advice do I have?

My advice is to make sure you have the budget for it. That's the only advice. It just goes with technology. Would you buy Beats headphones or would you buy some headphones at the gas station or the petrol station down the street? You'd probably go for the Beats, right? You'd probably go there because it's what you get. The money you pay is what you get, it's that type of investment. Here's the thing, Eggplant is pretty awesome. It is the best tool out there. TestComplete can still do the same thing, but with TestComplete, you've got to have junior developers for it. You can get it cheaper, but if you have some developers that know how to write object oriented languages, then you could step in and be very effective with it. QF-test and Katalon are cheap software. But at the same time, they have a learning curve that requires calls to their support. And then their support will bill you in the end so it's money out of your pocket.

When you go into GUI automation, you have to ask yourself, "How much money do I have and what is the best return on an investment that I'm going to get?" I have to say that if you don't have a lot of money, then maybe QF-test or Katalon would be your way to go. And you're still looking for a GUI solution. If you have developers that are skilled, then maybe you go with TestComplete or you step into Appium or Selenium, depending on your application.

There is a tool for everything, but there's one tool that rules them all. And I have to say that it's Eggplant. I'm not going to lie, Eggplant is not only a tool for people that don't know what they're doing with automation it is also a tool for developers, because I've seen developers pull it right out of the box and slay it on the first five minutes. Like, "Oh. Yeah, I know how to do this." 

On a scale of 1 to ten, I would give Eggplant Functional a 10 out of 10, even with some of the issues. Like I said, it's the dog's bollocks. It's what I would pick every time if the finances and everything were there, boom, all the time, any day, every day.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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Nevor Yard
Senior Technical Support Analyst at Kaeppel Consulting, LLC
Real User
Top 20
Offers great automation and text reading ability

Pros and Cons

  • "Good text reading ability."
  • "The solution would crash from time to time."

What is our primary use case?

Our primary use case of Eggplant was for test automation for vulnerability scanning. We were making sure certain things were installed and in place; dates, scanning certain texts to make sure that what it was looking for matched in terms of dates and version numbers, things like that. This solution is software as a service. I'm a senior technical support analyst.

How has it helped my organization?

The difference was that rather than dealing with each machine individually, we could literally just click a start or script run and do what was required. The automation saved a lot of time and effort.

What is most valuable?

I love a good portion of this solution, the stand outs for me are the ability to read texts, and being able to automate anything you wish to do. If I wanted to go on YouTube and load up a specific video and have it take a certain image that appears on the screen, I can do it - it's pretty amazing, pretty cool.

What needs improvement?

The biggest issue I had was the crashing. You could be in the middle of setting up and writing up a nice little script and then it would crash. It was a common occurrence and frustrating but we handled it.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

In the time that I used Eggplant, the software crashed quite a few times. Otherwise it was stable. There were some things we had to work around such as waiting for the computer to start up and adding personal credentials. Maybe there was a way for batch scripting to be integrated that might have helped. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I'm pretty sure it's scalable but I've never thought of it in those terms. We had two or three hands-on users who worked with Eggplant on a daily basis; we were all working on testing. 

How are customer service and technical support?

I never contacted technical support. We had our own in-house personnel that assisted us when needed. 

How was the initial setup?

There were seven or eight people involved in the deployment. I don't recall the timeframe but it did take some time. 

What other advice do I have?

If you're trying to automate something you do on a daily or monthly basis, I would recommend this solution. But if it's something that you want to do right now, one time and only one time, then it's not a suitable solution.

I rate the solution nine out of 10. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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