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Linode is the #3 ranked solution in our list of top Infrastructure as a Service Clouds. It is most often compared to Amazon AWS: Linode vs Amazon AWS

What is Linode?

Simplify your cloud infrastructure with our Linux virtual machines and robust set of tools to develop, deploy, and scale your modern applications faster and easier.

Linode believes that in order to accelerate innovation in the cloud, virtual computing must be more accessible, affordable, and simple. Our infrastructure-as-a-service platform is deployed across 11 global markets from our data centers around the world and is supported by our Next Generation Network, advanced APIs, comprehensive services, and vast library of educational resources. Linode products, services, and people enable developers and businesses to build, deploy, and scale applications more easily and cost-effectively in the cloud.

Increase storage capacity with additional Block Storage or S3-compatible Object Storage. Add instant Backups with complete independency to your stack. Ensure your applications and services are highly-available with Linode NodeBalancers. Deploy Kubernetes clusters with our fully-managed container orchestration engine.

Linode Pricing Page

CPU, transfer, storage, and RAM bundled into one simple price.

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Linode Buyer's Guide

Download the Linode Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: October 2021

Linode Customers

Best Buy, Panasonic, Giphy, Marco Polo, World Health Organization, Font Squirrel

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Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Linode pricing:
  • "The monthly cost depends on your requirements."
  • "At this point, I'm paying more like $35 per month for a slightly bigger machine, and the backup, and the object service."
  • "I pay $5 per month for each of three servers, for a total of $15 per month, and I normally prepay a few months in advance."
  • "Being that they are small, their prices are slightly higher than the large providers like Amazon if you compare raw computing power."
  • "The biggest benefit of Linode is the pricing. It's the best deal in the business... Their pricing model is also very simple compared to Azure. I don't understand why Azure doesn't price things the way that Linode does."
  • "Pricing-wise, I find it simple in that they give you a monthly fee, but they also charge it hourly. So, if you are using the service for a small part of the month, then you are only paying for that small amount instead of a whole month, like with other providers. It is a flat monthly fee if you use the service for the entire month. It just makes things so simple. Because they are focusing on Linux, you don't have to worry about licensing costs of Windows and things like that. So, the price that they give you is the price that you need to pay each month. I just find it so simple compared to the likes of AWS and Azure. It is nice, easy, and predictable. I know exactly what I am going to be paying each month and what resources I get for that price."
  • "There might be something a little bit cheaper but I find it very fair and competitive, and nothing to complain about."
  • "The pricing model is very simple. I like the simplicity of it, starting at $5, then doubling as it goes up from there. That is a brilliant idea, and it is not complex at all. It is about as dead simple as you can imagine. So, if you want to double what you have, then you double your price, pay the money, and reboot. It is done. It's that simple. You can't beat that."

Linode Reviews

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Julio Graham
Managing Director at Olive Professional Services Ltd
Real User
Top 5
Helpful automation scripts, good documentation, responsive support, easy to use and manage

Pros and Cons

  • "The ability to fire up a virtual machine, use it, and then kill it, is quite a valuable feature for me."
  • "Before they changed the dashboard, I found some of the more granular options easier to find."

What is our primary use case?

Linode is a service that hosts virtual machines for you.

How has it helped my organization?

It is important to me that Linode offers a small, but well-focused set of cloud computing services, and there are two reasons. I've got a lot of choices because you can do a lot of things with Linode, but the core of what they offer is the ability to host your own cloud.

The size of the applications that you can use is significant. For example, you can run some massive infrastructure through Linode if you need to. The focused set of services is important because if you compare with Amazon, for example, they have AWS cloud, and it has a lot of things that get really very confusing. I understand technology, but I'm a business person more than a technologist. So, for me, the fact that they're focused means that they are working on the latest technology.

They are also practical and don't just use a component because it's there. They've got specific paths, such as migration paths, and they understand what I call fundamental IT. They understand that very well and it's invaluable. For example, one time I had to contact support because someone on my end deleted something. I phoned them at two o'clock in the morning to open a support ticket and a human being answered the phone. They said, "Oh yeah, no, we can do that. All done." Ten minutes later, the problem was resolved and life was fine. Essentially, they understand the practicalities of IT the way it should be in terms of the fundamentals. This is something that a lot of people don't understand.

An example that I'm thinking of is where you have a large call center that is located somewhere else in the world and people don't speak English, which is always a problem. They've got scripts that they go through and based on what you describe, they try to tell you the problem or ask you more questions. You'll be forced to go through a poor process, whereas Linode doesn't do that. Linode is just human beings who are IT literate, for want of a better word, dealing with you at every step of the way. That's important.

To me, it's very important that they haven't lost their focus, even though their capabilities seem to have expanded quite a lot.

Another way that Linode has improved the way my organization functions is that I don't have to have the physical infrastructure, anywhere. This means that I can work from anywhere in the world with the same infrastructure. Whether I'm in the United Kingdom, whether I'm in South Africa, whether I'm in Costa Rica, makes no difference. This is a massive advantage.

Many people think that because it's the web, and it's all-pervasive, it is just "old hat". But to have infrastructure that you can access from anywhere is absolutely brilliant. So, that's one area.

I used to host all my own stuff but I've gotten to the point now where I think I've got one server in-house, and that is full of what I call pet projects. I don't even know if I've got backups of that.

On the topic of backups, human beings don't like doing them. Also, IT people set backups and never look at them again. At least at Linode, you choose their backups and you know you've got three backups a day that you could fall back on, in the worst case. It's brilliant for me from that point of view.

Because of the ease of use, I can offer it to more clients. It's a doorway for me to customers where maybe I would have had to have a much more technical staff. As it is now, I don't have to, and it's not a deal-breaker. The customer is not saying that I don't have a server expert because I do. It's Linode.

In terms of helping me to accelerate innovation, Linode has got a whole bunch of storage options now. They've got features where you can attach data in different ways, which is something that they have addressed in the past couple of years. You can have Amazon buckets, as well as other clever things. I don't know whether they were the first to support or offer things in this way, but they definitely made the accessibility to some of these more obscure storage options easier. If you want to attach to an S3 bucket, it's always been quite a challenge, whereas with Linode, you just put in your credentials and it'll attach to the bucket for you. From that point of view, I see them changing the underlying technology constantly because you see the upgrades as they come through. Without even having a strategy to remain on top of things, Linode has enabled that for me.

If I want to fire up anything that is attached to any of the common data types, it's not a difficult thing to do at all because that is what they're doing. For example, I've just seen something new on their site, which is called a cloud firewall. It's in beta testing. So, looking around, I can see that there's going to be a new service that they're going to add back on top of all of that. It means that if I've got a cloud firewall, I don't have to worry about other firewalls on my machines. I just stick them all behind one firewall. This means one setup, one cost, etc. That's innovation for you because, one, they're making life easier for me. I don't have to set up a whole bunch of things. Secondly, they make a new income stream for themselves, which is brilliant.

What is most valuable?

The ability to fire up a virtual machine, use it, and then kill it, is quite a valuable feature for me. They have a lot of startup scripts, I think they are called stack scripts, whereby you can install something at a click of a button. For instance, you can install a whole server at the click of a button. Linode gives the users a lot of control.

Another thing that I use quite a lot is their documentation. They have documentation on how to perform tasks and often, I use that to educate a client on how to do something or on how to maintain something, et cetera. This is because a lot of customers are used to simpler systems like an iPhone, where if you want an app then you just download it from a store, press a button and it installs, or press a button and it updates.

The truth of the matter is that with servers and things like that, whilst people like the push button idea, it's a lot more complex than that. With these stack scripts, the people at Linode have thought about all of the things that a new user would not think about. They do all of that stuff and then walk you through it, and that's where Linode's documentation is really good. They walk you through what you have to do to secure a server, what you have to do to run a patch, or whatever.

They've got all those sorts of knowledge bases of information, which I think is invaluable, especially for clients who are uneducated in these things.

It's extremely important to me that Linode offers worldwide coverage via multiple data centers, for various reasons. One is that because we live in this global world, our customers are everywhere. Secondly, for people who need geo-redundancy, with for example a server in China and one elsewhere as a backup, it's great.

It's also nice because if they were just US-based, I wouldn't be able to use them because I would need to go through a whole process of trying to certify the data integrity in other regions. I'm sure that most people wouldn't bother with this because of all of the EU laws and the UK laws around data privacy.

The US's data privacy laws are far more relaxed than what they are on my side of the world. The fact that I can have a server in London means that I don't have to bother with all of that. My physical location of that server is in London and to me, it is really important.

When you compare Amazon, they claim to have infrastructure all over the place but I think that the bulk is centered in Germany. Even if it is in a few different places, everything gets backed up to the US, which is a problem for a lot of people.

What needs improvement?

Before they changed the dashboard, I found some of the more granular options easier to find. However, it was just a matter of getting used to the new interface.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been working with Linode for more than 10 years, since 2009.

I've got two use cases. The first one is that I use Linode to host my own personal servers that host programs and software. Some of the applications are things like firewalls, et cetera. Any offsite technology infrastructure that I need, I use Linode for.

My second use case is that when I provide my customers with solutions that are cloud-based, where it is customized software, websites, or something else that they want control over, I spin up a Linode for them and then hand it over to the customer. I'm constantly giving Linode new customers as I provide people with solutions. I normally spin the Linode up myself and then pass it on to the client. Once my relationship with that customer is over and my side is fulfilled, they continue a relationship with Linode as their infrastructure provider.

That said, the main objective is not to resell their product. What I'm doing is I'm including Linode as the hosting infrastructure in the solutions that I sell. This allows people to have a virtual machine in the cloud at a very reasonable price. For example, a lot of people use that for their bespoke websites, membership sites, or for hosting other services.

Our company makes some bespoke software for the music industry, for example, whereby they can manage contracts and things like that. When people purchase this, instead of giving them a physical machine in the office, I give them a Linode machine and my software is on that, which is how Linode gets bundled along with everything else.

I don't make any money on top of the Linode service. Rather, I just say to the customer, "You've got to pay Linode $20 or whatever it is a month to carry on using Linode." At that point, they say, "Absolutely," because they've got backups and all of the good stuff without any of the downsides, for literally a tenth, or in some cases a hundredth of the price compared to having to do it on their own site.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The overall stability is brilliant. I don't think I've ever had downtime that I wasn't in control of, for upgrades as an example. I don't think I've ever had an outage. 

There have been some DNS problems once or twice, but not a single one of my clients phoned me and said, "Hey, this is not working."

I use Linode daily. The machines serve all of my websites, some of my client's websites, some of my user applications, and some of my knowledge base stuff. I've got customers who've got critical data, such as their financial data stored on Linode. To me, Linode is like having your coffee in the morning or breathing. It is integral.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I think that if I had to do something massive, it would be easy. Scalability-wise, if you've got the money, the sky's the limit with them. I'm guessing that if you were to try and buy some of their massive offerings, GPUs, which are $4,000 a month, I'm guessing that'll take a little bit of time to set up, but I may be wrong because I've never done that.

Basically, if I look at the options that they have, you can move from anything from a tiny one-gig configuration to something that's got 125 gigabytes or 200 gigabytes of memory. That's ridiculous. There is more RAM than you've got hard-disk storage in some cases.

There are also a lot of articles that help people. If you want redundancy, for example, you're going to go and have a look and see, "Okay, that's how I do that.", and then you've learned something. That's the beauty of it, is that they're not like all these proprietary people, everything's under a hat and you don't know until you pay your money. They're quite open about everything.

I have customers who use Linode, but I am the only person in my organization who uses it at the moment. I have one other software developer who has access to it. At the moment I've got one machine on Linode, which I've just recently made slightly smaller. It runs about 40 or 50 websites and web applications for myself and for some of my clients.

Every time I get a new project, I fire up a new Linode. I use it for as long as I need it for the project and then I kill it again. So as soon as I get my next customer, I'll be adding another Linode to my account.

My current Linode that's running now, I recently down-scaled because a lot of customers have moved away, and also, we're trying to save money wherever we can. I didn't have to go to Linode and explain that I was suffering because COVID has taken away some of the customers. Rather, I went onto my dashboard, selected to make it smaller, and they warned me to ensure that I had taken care of three steps first. I went ahead and took care of the one that I hadn't done, and the other two were not applicable to me.

Once that was complete, I pressed the button and my Linode was half the cost in less than 10 minutes. I have got control of everything that I do. If at the end of next month things are back to normal, then I'll press the button and double my usage again. I expect that I'll be adding customers to it after that. In the meantime, I have the freedom to do what I want and I'm not captured by any sort of contract. I trust the people at Linode explicitly.

How are customer service and technical support?

Linode has 24/7, no-tiered human customer support, and its flexibility and overall responsiveness are why I don't use the other major providers. They are very responsive and are quite happy to listen to what you have to say, rather than trying to rush you through the process. You get a very real and very human interface, even with their email systems and through their ticketing systems. All of that appears to be very considered and it appears to be unique to you. You're not just getting a knowledge base thrown at you and told, "Go and sort through that and figure out what's going on."

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I also have some experience with Amazon AWS, and it is more complex than Linode. I know a little bit about the AWS pricing, where they bill according to time, at perhaps the millisecond level. I did use them in the early days but I got burned a few times where I suddenly had a bill of $1,000 when I didn't even realize that the machine was on. Amazon was quite unforgiving, at least in those days, about such things.

Linode, on the other hand, has a maximum cap that you can pay. If you use less, you pay less. I think that they're quite smart in that they worked out that cap quite well because you never really pay much less than that. It's a fixed price and whoever did those calculations has done them well.

I have no idea how much I have saved over the years by choosing Linode, but just from a management point of view, no one's time is spent having to double-check how much your bill's going to be all the time. I would estimate that would be one or two hours, of someone who knows what they're doing, a month having to do that. If you take a support person, earning, for example, $5,000 to $8,000 per month, if you consider what two hours of the month would cost, that's probably the cost of the savings. If you manage these things properly, obviously, you can keep the costs the same. Honestly, I haven't put much thought into it or wondered if anybody had better pricing because Linode does everything that I need, nicely.

Generally speaking, as I have been a customer of Linode for a long time, I don't have a lot of experience with other cloud providers. I don't even bother with them. But, I can tell you from seeing customers that have had other providers that I've got absolutely no problems with response time, in comparison.

I don't ever run anything that's mission-critical to the point where I need support in five minutes with someone. I don't have anything like that. None of my customers do because we build our systems so that there's redundancy. If something goes down, it's much like having a backup for your electricity. It doesn't really matter if it's down 5% or 2%, because you've got a backup.

That's the same with the way that we design solutions for our customers and for ourselves. If Linode does go down, normally, they're not down for long. When I say not for long, it's minutes. They communicate well and for the maintenance they do, they let you know months in advance. So, it's only your own fault if you suddenly find yourself caught in a situation where you're not prepared. Ultimately, they've got a very good balance and I think that they have got a very good future.

An example of this is that one of my machines needed to be moved to Tucson. It was a virtual machine that needed to be moved to some other hardware, which is a process that they said could take up to two hours. They said to me, if you do nothing, we're going to move it in April or whenever it was, but you can click here and move it at your convenience. I know when the US is not so busy because I'm half awake when they're still sleeping, so I pressed the button one morning and it took less than 20 minutes to move.

My machine was back up and running. Nobody knew, in terms of my users, that it had even happened. So, their response times and their options, because they allow you to manage so much yourself, are great. It's a very good balance between moving forward and balancing that with the needs of the customer.

How was the initial setup?

Linode is a virtual machine, so I'm often setting them up for the first time. I have images that I set up to be Linode in a particular format, and I can run them by hitting a button that says Deploy New Linode. It asks me what size, where, I press a button and it deploys that machine that I had deployed two years ago, exactly the same way. It means that if you're doing repetitive stuff, you shouldn't have to be doing it from scratch every time. You can just make an image and deploy your Linode from it. They've really made it quite easy.

Setting up a Linode from scratch is child's play. It's literally easier than updating your iPhone. But, it's what you have to do after that you need to consider. Depending on your choice of what you want to do, such as installing Ubuntu or some other software, that's where the complexity comes in. However, that's not Linode's issue. That's an issue with whatever it is you're doing.

The actual acquisition of a machine takes just minutes. I've got six questions to answer and when I press that button that says create, it takes approximately a minute and then you've got a machine that has an operating system installed. It's a basic operating system, whatever you choose, and a root password. It is at this point when the complications start because that's when you then have to do all the stuff that you do to set up a machine, but that's not a Linode function. That's a user function.

For what I do, if I start from scratch, without my pre-installed stuff, it could take me anything from 15 minutes for a basic system to about four hours for a complicated one. But, that's after the Linode set up. For example, setting up a Laravel dev environment probably takes me about three minutes, because I just pop an image and I say, "Deploy this image," and it just goes and does it. If you take a look at their marketplace, they've got apps that you can use to set up various machines.

In the marketplace, there are apps available to help you set up a cloud server, an open VPN, Jenkins, LAMP, or anything. You just say, "This is what I want," and that script runs for you. Another example is Minecraft; if you want the Java edition of Minecraft, you can go and set that up and it'll take you five minutes. Any customer can do this and you don't have to be a tech guru.

What was our ROI?

It is tough to determine what my return on investment is. I think there's a cost benefit more than a return on investment. When you look at an organization in terms of infrastructure setup, I've had a much lower cost than I would have, had I used the traditional bare metal or hardwired approach.

Compared to a traditional method with a server, plus someone running it, and all of the administration that comes with it, my cost savings are literally a hundredfold or a thousandfold. Moreover, without Linode, I probably wouldn't have been able to offer some of the services to some of the markets that I have in the past because of the pricing.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The monthly cost depends on your requirements.

The pricing is absolutely spot on. I think whoever thought about how their pricing should work and how their sizing should work, clearly understands the use case of their customers. I'm a tiny customer of theirs, but, I'm loyal to them because they constantly deliver and they do things that make sense.

I'm not paying any more now than I was paying in 2009. As a matter of fact, I think I'm probably paying less now than I was then, yet I've probably got 20 or 30 or 40 times larger resources available to me. Every time they upgrade their infrastructure, they don't say, "Oh, we've got new equipment, now we're going to charge you more." Instead, they say that they will carry on charging you the same or less, yet, we have better stuff for you. That is just a good business model, which has stood them in good stead.

What other advice do I have?

Because I am such a happy customer, it is difficult to point to an area that is in need of improvement. I've not had a use case, and none of my customers have said, "Oh, we would have loved to have used Linode, but they don't do X." What they do is more than adequate for what I need. In my view, you'd have to go a long way to find something. I don't use the API, although I've seen a lot of documentation on it. I'm guessing that the API is an area where people would want different accessibilities, but I don't know enough about that to be able to comment.

They changed the dashboard quite a while back, but there was a while when you could switch between the classic and new one. The classic one had some different granularity, which was nice, but I've now found that with the new one. It had looked like some of that granularity had gone away, but it's just in other places. Ultimately, it was just a matter of getting used to what it looked like.

I think the new interface is more modern-looking and probably a little more user-friendly. However, when you've used something for a long time and then it changes, you think, "Oh, what's going on?" But I've not found myself sitting and wondering what is happening in different parts of the solution. I would say that now, it's fine.

Quite a while ago, they moved away from one particular underlying technology that is used for the virtualization of machines. There are two types of virtualization, and they moved from one to the other. I'm not sure of the details but there was a massive improvement as a result. I could tell because I only moved some of my machines at the time, and left some of them on the first platform. There was a noticeable difference and it was big. Whatever they did in terms of the backend of their virtualization, when they moved from one of the main ones to a better one, that was a good move.

The biggest lesson that I have learned from using Linode is that you can be human and still provide a good service. I don't know anybody in the company and I don't particularly follow any of their leaders, they're not even on my radar. That said, every single interaction I've had with Linode has always had all of my core values in there. Integrity is an important one.

I find that often with tech companies, they lose humanness for the sake of efficiency, or other reasons. Banks have also lost it. A lot of people have lost that human touch and whilst I don't think Linode in any way have ever said, "Oh, we're the company with a human touch.", I can tell you that they definitely, you can feel the love and the fact that people know what they're doing and they care about what they're doing.

My advice for anybody who is thinking about using Linode is to know what you want, and if you don't know what you want, ask Linode because they'll know what you want. Often with these sorts of things, you tend to do your research first and then go to a vendor and ask them, based on your research, what you want. I would be very comfortable suggesting to any customer of mine that they ask Linode.

I am confident that they are not going to try and figure out how much you can afford and then nail you with that. They'll give you the options. They're very transparent. That way, you end up buying what you need as opposed to buying what someone's trying to sell you or what someone thinks you need.

In summary, Linode is a good product and I love them.

I would rate this solution a ten out of ten.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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Allister MacLeod
DevOps Engineer at a computer software company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 5
Straightforward to set up, helpful support, and the Object Storage is useful for system backups

Pros and Cons

  • "The most valuable feature is the static IP address, which has been very helpful for being able to log into the same address over the course of more than a decade."
  • "I would like to see more seamless integration with backup, although it's pretty easy to do."

What is our primary use case?

I have a single 4GB model Linode and I use it as a personal server. I originally set it up to act as an email server, just for my own personal vanity domain. I don't use it for that anymore, but it's proved to be useful for many other things.

Right now, I run a Minecraft server on it and I also use it for a little bit of software development. I also use it as a jump host, if I need a stable place to SSH from my laptop to get to other online resources. It means that I only have a single point that I go through to get to the other stuff that I need.

How has it helped my organization?

I would say it's very important that Linode offers a relatively small, but well-focused set of cloud computing services because it differentiates them from AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud by being focused and by having a more personal touch. I could probably get the same compute power for a little bit less from other providers, but the value of the continuity and the high quality of support is worth it. It's rare that I need to reach out to support, but when I do, the support is great.

Even though I use it for personal use, some of the things that I use it for are in a software development capacity. For example, the ability to experiment with running my own Mercurial server, Git server, and source control servers on this machine have leveled up my own knowledge of those products in a way that I think a more managed solution wouldn't. Having the tools in-hand of just a Linux box that I can play with, and that I can wipe and reimage at will, is more useful than a physical machine by virtue of that virtual rewriting. It is also more useful than a more abstracted managed service, just in that I can get my hands dirty and do rapid experimentation.

Linode has helped me to accelerate innovation and even though I'm not using this in an enterprise way, it has improved the way I innovate with respect to personal stuff. For example, it has helped with the things that I'm trying to learn and the things that I'm trying to do. Setting up a Minecraft server is a good example of that. Being able to read some of the documentation that Linode has about setting up a Minecraft server on your VPS, and just learning and figuring stuff out, has been valuable.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the static IP address, which has been very helpful for being able to log into the same address over the course of more than a decade.

Another useful feature is being able to have multiple system images that I can play with. I mostly use Ubuntu Linux, but if I want to play with a new version of Ubuntu, I can pretty easily add that. It's been super useful to upgrade my system over the years.

I just recently started using the Object Storage and Backup features, as well. Having good backups for peace of mind and disaster recovery is very nice as well.

Object Storage has been key, for me. I don't have a strong notion of exactly when Linode introduced Object Storage, but it's been very useful for me, for instance, in backing up my Git server, in addition to the whole node backup. The fact that I can interact from the command line with the Linode Object service to back up specific datasets, is super cool. I know they didn't have it when I first started using Linode and I think it's been introduced fairly recently, within the last couple of years.

The Linode documentation is superb. 

What needs improvement?

I would like to see more seamless integration with backup, although it's pretty easy to do.

Having more on-demand features would be helpful. For example, if for a little while I wanted to have four Linodes instead of just a single one, it seems like it's a little bit more difficult than spinning up an EC2 instance in AWS. It isn't a lot harder, but it could be improved nonetheless.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Linode for more than a decade, since 2008 or 2009.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is excellent. It's very rare that there is an interruption in the service. I think that the reboot notices that I get, that aren't related to me doing stuff, are less than one a year. I think, in some cases, it's been four or five years between needing to have any kind of stability-related events on the machine. I can't think of any outages in the entire course of me using it, that anything with any kind of significant impact.

Part of the thing that I value about the single Linode that I have is that it is a very steady, stable known quantity. I don't have to worry about all the institutional weight that I do with interacting with AWS, which I do a lot from work.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Thinking about it from an operations point of view, I think that I would have a bit of a harder time scaling in Linode than I would in AWS, but not a whole lot harder. Given the Kubernetes support, I would imagine that that makes the process even easier. That said, I have not tried Kubernetes so I really have insufficient data to be sure.

It's not likely that I'm going to significantly increase my usage in the future. I might bump up to a higher size if I find that I need more CPU or RAM. Or, I might play around with having two to four Linode nodes. But beyond that, it's unlikely that I'm going to expand much.

I will definitely keep using Linode for as long as it is as stable and reasonably priced as it is, but at a steady one machine for my personal purposes.

How are customer service and technical support?

The support from Linode is great. All of the times that I've reached out, it's been through email or through the web portal. It's always felt good and it felt like the person responding understood what I was asking about and solved it very quickly.

In terms of flexibility and overall responsiveness, the support is very good to excellent. Certainly, everyone that I've interacted with, in the fairly rare occasions that I do need support, have been very knowledgeable about the product and very good at understanding what issues I'm having and how to solve them.

I would say compared to AWS, AWS support varies a lot in terms of responsiveness and whether you've got a paid support plan. Sometimes, it does take a fair bit of back-and-forth with AWS support to get to the crux of the problem. I've never felt that back-and-forth was as necessary, that we get to the crux of the problem and solve it much more quickly with Linode.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Prior to using Linode, all of the machines that I had managed were all physical. I had my own personal machines and machines that I built for work, but they were all physical PCs or other architectures that I had to actually open up a case, and if I needed more RAM, I had to put the sticks in myself.

In comparison to a physical server, Linode has definitely saved me money. I never want to build a server again. Basically, if you build a physical machine and it is obsolete within two to five years, you've got to buy and recreate the whole thing again. Generally, the hardware is going to get cheaper over time, but I think that unless I were really putting a microscope on getting the cheapest components for building, Linode will cost less.

In some contexts, albeit not mine with just one or a few machines, it would make sense to build them. However, not having to worry about it and just letting Linode take care of the hardware upgrades is probably saving me money. I don't know if it would save a very tightly tuned hardware IT team money, but that's a completely different scale than what I'm looking at.

Linode was my first experience with virtual cloud servers and virtual machines, in general. Not too long after I started using Linode, I did start doing more with VMware, with an on-premises, physical server hosting multiple virtual machines. It was not too long after that when I got into AWS for work.

How was the initial setup?

I found the initial setup to be fairly straightforward. It's so long ago that the details are fuzzy but I recall that I set up the account, chose names for things, picked which size I wanted, and then launched it. Within, what at that time, was an astonishingly short amount of time, I was able to log into it. It's just gotten better from there.

I didn't require an implementation strategy, although I think that's peculiar to using it as a single thing for personal use. I had the notion that I wanted a persistent Linux machine that was always on, and that I could get to from anywhere, and Linode seemed to fit the bill.

Over the years, I've used it for a lot of different purposes and it's adapted well to that. So I would say in this case, I didn't need a whole lot of planning. If I were to use Linode for a more complex deployment, I would want to plan it out, figure out what the costs are, figure out the network topology, and the other relevant details.

What about the implementation team?

Linode offers worldwide coverage via multiple data centers, although I don't personally need that. It's a very attractive feature for sure, but since I just have the one virtual private server and it's just for me and for my friends connecting to it, I want it to be geographically close to me to have a low ping. I think it's located in New Jersey, and that's good for me, being in New England. While global coverage is not super important to me, in so far as it contributes to the health of Linode in general, I'm all for it.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The pricing model is simple, and that's one of the reasons that I've stuck with Linode for so long. When I was on the $20 Linode, I knew for a fact that on the first of every month, my credit card would get charged $20. That meant my Linode was available constantly.

At this point, I'm paying more like $35 per month for a slightly bigger machine, and the backup, and the object service. But again, I know that it's exactly $35 every month and I can budget for it. The simplicity and the consistency of that billing and pricing are quite valuable to me. Whereas with AWS, it's a crapshoot. The on-demand pricing means it's flexible and I only pay for what I use, but it's also much less predictable.

It is tough to determine whether using Linode has saved me money compared to what I would pay with other cloud providers. I don't think it has on a pure numbers basis, but in opportunity cost and higher-level budget planning, I think that the consistency probably has saved me money. I would have spent more time trying things, allocating things that I might not need, and so on. Ultimately, it saved me capital in the long run but it is not necessarily something that I can put a dollar figure on.

In comparison to everything else, predictability is the key aspect of the pricing model. With it being a known quantity that I can budget for every month, it frees up brain cycles to do everything else.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

In my personal capacity, at this point, I have my Linode and I have a personal AWS account, and I use them for different purposes, but to similar degrees, or similar magnitudes. I find that just looking at it from a strict CPU and RAM horsepower perspective, EC2 is just marginally cheaper, but there are different features that I value in different places.

I took a brief look at some other things like Azure, Google Cloud Engine, and DigitalOcean, and I found that when I was looking, and this was probably about five or six years ago, that a lot of things that I wanted were pretty comparable in terms of capabilities and pricing. A lot of it came down to what I valued, in terms of the positioning, and support, and documentation, where I very much like Linode's documentation, especially, and support.

Of the others that I evaluated, DigitalOcean seemed the friendliest. And then, AWS and Azure were the behemoths, the 800-pound gorillas in the room.

What other advice do I have?

The biggest lesson that I have learned from using Linode is the oldest lesson, which is just that a virtual cloud server has the availability and the flexibility that I couldn't get from physical at the time, or even now, for that matter. It's a key component in having something that's useful, having a machine that you can log into and do things on, in a consistent way, regardless of where I am or even what machine I'm connecting to it from.

My key advice for anybody who is looking into Linode would be just to dive right in. Pick it up and play around with it and if you find that it's not for you, try something else. But if you find that you love it, keep going.

In summary, Linode is a good product and I've been extremely satisfied with it for exactly the purposes I use it for. I have been pleased with it since I started using it.

I would rate this solution a ten out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Other
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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Learn what your peers think about Linode. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: October 2021.
543,089 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Jacques Gelinas
Vice President Technologies at Croesus
Real User
Top 20
Cost-effective, well managed, reliable, and helpful support

Pros and Cons

  • "They have a very nice web interface to allow you to manage and reorganize your server."
  • "I don't know how all of their services work, but my understanding is that they're not offering the entry-level machine for someone who just wants to own their own web page."

What is our primary use case?

I have my own social media system called bolixo.org, and I am hosting it using Linode.

How has it helped my organization?

For smaller companies, it is very important that they have a small but well-focused set of cloud computing services. They are very inexpensive and very reliable. I am a light user and do not use all of the services, but I'm a serious user. In the cloud business, there is another kind of entry-level service, where they provide you, for example, a web server and you only have to provide content. Linode is another side of the cloud business, where they're providing you a full solution. This is your server so you're managing whatever you want to host on it.

Using Linode helps me for a simple reason, which is that I do nothing with respect to the servers. I don't have servers and I do not want to have servers. I managed servers for four years and I know how it's done, but, I don't want to care, for example, about power. Where I am, we have a lot of power failures. This week alone, I have had 16 hours of power failures. Clearly, I don't have the technology in-house to support that long without power. I know that it exists, where I can put in a generator or come up with another solution, but I don't want to do that. Instead, I want to concentrate on what I'm doing. Linode delivers an inexpensive service and it's completely reliable.

What is most valuable?

I am a long-time believer in the Linux operating system and have been using it for approximately 28 years, and the fact that Linode provides me with Linux Nodes is something that I like. Linode got its name from "Linux Node".

They have a very nice web interface to allow you to manage and reorganize your server.

Having data centers in different regions is good for latency. They have a presence in Japan, Europe, the US, and Toronto, Canada. If I install a server in Europe and people from that area are using it then it will be faster for them. There is a visible difference between my servers, where one of them is in New York and another is in California. It's basically a continent away, but I see a difference. There is great value in the fact that I can have European users served by a European server.

They have a lot of features that I am not yet using, but I will have to use them at some point. For example, it's possible to create a server and keep that as a standard image. Later, when you create a server, instead of selecting one of their pre-configured images, you select your own.  This means that you can deploy more servers quickly. If at some point my project grows, and I expect to deploy many servers per week, I will need to use this feature.

Also, my understanding is that they have a full set of APIs, so I can interact with them by using programs. I've not used that, but I intend to check it at some point. With only three servers, this is a non-issue, but if I grow to 100 or 200 servers, at some point, I'll need some way to automate my interaction with Linode.

The network connectivity is very good. With the entry-level service that I am using, I am getting one terabyte of data transfer per month. This means that with three servers, I have three terabytes of aggregate, which leaves me a lot of room to grow.

What needs improvement?

It is important to me that Linode offers worldwide coverage via multiple data centers, although it is also an issue for me. In running my social media site, I am not spying on users or reselling their data. For many users, it is really important to know that their data will be handled according to the law in their country.

I am located on the East coast of Canada but have my node at a data center in California. You can decide where you want to create your note. For example, I know that they have a data center in Europe, so at some point, I will create a node there. Because it's a distributed system, when the user creates their account, they can choose to have it there if they want the data to be stored according to European regulations. The data will remain there forever.

The issue comes about because Linode is a US company, so my users have to wonder how shielded they are from US law. I know of a situation involving Microsoft, which is a very large company, and they were fighting the US government because they have a data center in Ireland. The US wanted to retrieve data from it and Microsoft declined because it was out of their jurisdiction. Some people are concerned with having their data shielded from US law and I spoke with Linode about this, and they don't have an answer. In fact, if the US government asked Linode for help spying on a customer in Europe, Linode would not even be allowed to tell anyone about it. It is clear that Linode has the technology to spy on usage, although that is not to say that they are doing it.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Linode since 2017.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Linode is a very reliable product. There have been issues over the years but they have always been solved by the support team. They have done maintenance on their side over the years. so there were some service outages. However, they were planned and very short. There have not been very many of them, with perhaps a frequency of once a year. It's very light. I would expect this from any type of company that hosts a web server or something similar.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I'm not their biggest customer, by far. They have an entry-level product called the Nanode, which is a minimal server that costs $5 per month. Linode was the first cloud service to offer such a low-priced, entry-level solution.

This is the only solution I'm using. I have three Nanodes and I started with one in 2017. By the end of 2018, I had moved to three. I hope I will grow because I'm working on a social media system that is not really well-known, called bolixo.org.

I can't comment greatly about scalability because I'm not using it to a great extent. However, I can say that in more than three years that I have been using it, I've never noticed that I wasn't alone. I certainly know that on a physical server, there may be perhaps 60 customers running on it at the same time. This is a guess, as it could just as easily be 30 or 100 users, but the point is that I've never noticed that there was a slow down I could not explain. Essentially, it means that it's well managed.

I know at some point, when I had this problem where I was using it for 12 hours, my server was running 100% of the time. Their first proposition was to move me to a different server, which was less busy. But the problem was me, and we fixed that. At the same time, I think they do a nice job at making sure that they don't put all of the users on the same machine. They balance the load, which is the best I can say about them in terms of scalability. From my perspective, it always looks fast and reliable.

How are customer service and technical support?

The support has been great, even though I am not their biggest user. I have asked for service two or three times, and it was immediate.

At one point, when I had just rolled out a new version, they called me to say that for the past 12 hours, my system was using 100% of the CPU. According to the terms of service, you are not supposed to do that. I did not expect it because my server should be using very little in terms of CPU resources. As a result of this call, I checked my server.

I knew that the timeline fit because it was 12 hours earlier when I had upgraded, but I checked my server, and it was not busy. During this interaction with support, it was great because they provided me with many key points. Finally, we found that on my side, the tool I was using meant that my server was not busy. However, on their side, it was busy all the time. In the end, we both learned something new about virtualization and cloud computing. So this was my biggest interaction with them and it was nice because we both learned something and I fixed my problem.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

In my previous job, I worked with similar solutions from Microsoft and Google. We had a problem where one of our servers at Microsoft stopped working. We couldn't connect and called support to find out what was going on, only to find out that they had deleted it because they thought it was no longer in use.

I find the problem with Microsoft and Google is that they are too big. They are so big that it's like the smaller customers like me don't exist. You're a paying customer but you can't talk to anyone. In our case, we were dealing with Microsoft resellers and I don't know whose mistake it was, where they believed that we were no longer using it, but this would not happen with Linode.

One thing that I learned recently about Linode is that if my account goes unpaid, for whatever reason, then they will not immediately delete my server. Instead, my server will continue to run up to three months, with the balance in the negative. If after that time they hear nothing from me then it will be deleted. They are professional and this is something that makes sense, yet it seems lost on the bigger companies.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is very simple, although I am a techie, so it is expected.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

This is a very inexpensive product. I pay $5 per month for each of three servers, for a total of $15 per month, and I normally prepay a few months in advance.

What other advice do I have?

I recommend Linode for any company that wants to host a web server or other similar things.

Linode provides a lot of services that I don't use. For example, they provide backup functionality, load-balancing, monitoring, and other features that I do myself. In this regard, I am not a heavy user of their service. That said, I consider myself a very serious Linode user, but I'm using their product very lightly.

I'm glad that they do offer more services because as I grow, I may want to use them. For example, when it comes to something as simple as a backup, it can be a nightmare. I was an IT manager and I found that performing backups was very simple, but it was a nightmare at times. Ultimately, as I get larger, I may rely on them for this instead.

The backup feature is something that they will do professionally. I had an issue when I was working many years ago, where the person in charge of backup was supposed to do it every morning. However, there was an error in the backup system and he was not reporting it to anyone. This went on for months and when they needed the backup, it was not available. This is why it has to be done reliably.

The suitability of this product depends on your use case. If a very small company wants nothing other than to have a web presence, they might want to use GoDaddy, for example, where they're providing that kind of solution. They give you a web page, they run it for you and they do everything. But if you go to some custom solution, you need to provide your own web application and so on, then you have to go to the other side of the cloud, like Microsoft, Amazon with AWS, or Linode.

I don't know how all of their services work, but my understanding is that they're not offering the entry-level machine for someone who just wants to own their own web page. This is a situation where somebody might be using GoDaddy. But if you know how to manage a server, then they have a reliable solution for you that can scale internal offerings. If for example, you want a load-balancing then they have it, although I haven't tried it.

My recommendation is that if you are comfortable managing a server, you want a reliable solution with battery backup and features like that, as well as good network connectivity, then you should try Linode. This is a good product for techies and it allows you to offload many of the core aspects of managing a physical server.

Overall, I can say that what I am using works great. At this point, I am very happy with Linode.

I would rate this solution a ten out of ten.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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ME
Founder /CEO at Entropy Studios
Real User
Top 10
Flexible and responsive customer service, stable, and reasonably priced

Pros and Cons

  • "The most valuable feature is that they are flexible and easy to get ahold of if I need something."
  • "Because they are a smaller company, they do not have, for example, all of the ways for authentication that Amazon or Azure has."

What is our primary use case?

Initially, my use case was to have a server platform running that wasn't tied to the company that I worked for at the time. I wanted a solution where I could access our product and services from a platform that had no relation to our own. I was performing testing, as if coming from the outside as a customer of ours, having no network conductivity on our servers or anything like that. That was the first use case.

We realized that it was pretty handy to have a cloud platform that didn't reside in our network, so what happened next, when we moved our data center from Dallas to Florida, we employed the platform to facilitate it. We used a temporary name server and temporary mail server and another temporary server to keep some of our core services running while we were physically moving servers across the country.

When I moved and thought of this company, I used Linode as a temporary general server, as a holding place for all sorts of things. This included web services, our website, and other similar things. But then when I moved most of that to other providers, I still kept some of the web services running. So, it's like an application server for customers.

Basically, if I provide a service to a company, such as a mapping service for a logistics company, then my domain name can be used to access applications on the Linode server. I have a couple of instances there right now that are performing this task.

How has it helped my organization?

Linode offers worldwide coverage in multiple data centers, although this is not important to me because I only use the US data centers. In fact, one of the reasons that I stick with Linode is because of their US presence. Right now, I am only using the data center in Dallas and this specifically gives me a US presence.

Having a long-standing relationship with Linode, it's been easy to develop and subsequently deploy services provided to our customers on their platform. Without it, I would have to use a different platform like Amazon or Microsoft Azure, or something like that. Where this makes a difference is that it would take longer to get to market in the case where one of our customers requires a change or a specific feature that we don't normally provide. The fact that it is easy for us to modify that quickly and without much overhead means we can implement it. Essentially, the flexibility that Linode provides extends through us to our customers, which is a bonus for them.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is that they are flexible and easy to get a hold of if I need something. For example, if I need to provision a server quickly, or if I need to change something, or if I for some reason need to do something that's outside of my plan that I pay for, I can contact them quickly and always get a hold of someone and always get a solution for it. I don't know if this is typical or if it's just based on having been a customer for a reasonably long time, but that's the main reason that I stick with them. It can be summed up by saying that they provide a much better level of service than a larger company like Amazon. I use Amazon as well, but it's a different experience.

What needs improvement?

Because they are a smaller company, they do not have, for example, all of the ways for authentication that Amazon or Azure has. However, that's not a downside for me because it means it's less complex to implement for us. So, while it is simple compared to some large solutions, that's a benefit to me and not a drawback.

For how long have I used the solution?

I began working with Linode in 2004 or 2005 when I was working as a technology officer in my former company in the US. I still use the product but it for my own business in Europe. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Linode has been very stable. Every time there is an outage, they will always contact me beforehand to let me know that there is something planned. I've never had an unplanned outage, so it's positive.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability-wise, it has improved over time. Initially, it was harder to deploy complex servers and then grow them. What we'd have to do was shut them down and then scale up and then deploy a whole other server and then move whatever we had. This could have been an application or a number of applications, which were all moved to that new instance.

As it is now, you can just do it on the fly. But having said that, I don't really scale up and down very much. I generally know what I need and then deploy it. After that, if I ever discontinue something, we turn that off.

So in summary, I see that it has improved, but I haven't really used it much.

In my company, there are between three and five of us who work on it at any given time. Each of us performs multiple roles but in this capacity, we are system administrators and system engineers.

At this point, probably between 20% and 25% of the server and cloud needs are provided by Linode. As the business grows, the usage will grow, although it's always going to be proportional to what we have now. Given that 2020 was a pretty crazy year, it is very hard to predict growth right now.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I also use Amazon but It's a less personal experience. For example, if I'm abroad and I can't take care of something until I get back, I can't call Amazon and say, "Hey look, can you delay my invoice for two weeks, because I'm in Bangladesh and I have to deal with something," because my company is not big enough for that. With Linode, it's perfectly fine. You can just call them and they'll take care of it, which shows a high degree of flexibility and a high level of service.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was not very easy, although when I set it up, it was quite some time ago and things were more difficult on the web at that time. I think that the difficulty of the installation has been commensurate with the level of technology on the web at the time. It is easier to do now than it was when I started.

They have the Linode manager, which is an online interface that works by you starting with selecting a service. You select all of the things that you want to have included in your service, whether it's a bare metal server or a virtual server, or whether it's provisioning new storage for that server that you already have. After it's selected and it's up and running, you have the same KVM that you do on other services. For example, you have a virtual screen as if you were in front of your machine in the data center.

What was our ROI?

We're such a small company that we don't really do this type of financial breakdown. We're just happy if we make a little bit more money than we did last quarter. Nonetheless, I can say that we have seen ROI because I believe that our flexibility is partially based on Linode's flexibility, which lets us keep and get more clients. I just couldn't give a specific number of how much.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Being that they are small, their prices are slightly higher than the large providers like Amazon if you compare raw computing power. However, I understand they have to be slightly higher because they just don't have as many customers. If you come from the outside, not knowing how things are going to work, then look at the costs by doing a cost analysis, you might wonder why you should choose them if they're going to be more expensive across the board.

I can say that it doesn't affect me because I know what I'm paying for. It is easy to say that any solution can be cheaper and it could be better, but I know what Linode does, I understand the service I'm getting, and I know what it will provide me. As such, I think that it is fair and I am willing to pay the premium.

If you have a situation where you just want to spin up a server and run a test, without actually having a client and you don't want to incur too many costs, it's not been bad at all.

Considering support, response time, uptime, and price, I think that the price to performance ratio is pretty good. They've been very responsive whenever I have had questions, so from that point of view, I'm very satisfied.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I have experience with AWS and Azure but when it comes to evaluating other products, we haven't sat down and had comparison meetings or anything like that. Everybody that works in the company has been with me for a while, so they're very familiar with which servers and services work based on our needs.

There are obviously reasons to use, for example, Microsoft Azure because perhaps one of your services uses one of their services that they provide intimately. In a case like this, it's just easier to deploy on their platform because maybe you use one of their endpoints that are already on Azure.

I haven't seen any reason to compare the products because whatever service we create and develop to offer to our customers dictates where we put it.

What other advice do I have?

Linode offers a smaller, but well-focused set of cloud computing services to customers, which I think is important because they are able to provide a very high level of support. If they did everything, if they were much larger, maybe they couldn't maintain that level of support because it wouldn't work if all of their customers asked for special treatment.

My advice for anybody who is considering Linode is to start very small and become a customer of theirs, just so you get used to and familiar with the way that you deploy servers and services. I suggest this because of the fact that they are not a Microsoft or an Amazon, but rather they're a much smaller company.

Again, become familiar with it, and even if it seems a little basic at times, allocate a small part of your development budget to just becoming a customer. This involves creating an account and playing around a little bit, and you'll see that you have most of the features that you need.

That is what the experience has been like for me. Maybe it's not like that for everyone, but try it out. You will probably see that it's more than you might think initially, at least that's the reason that I stuck around and stayed with them for so long.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Other
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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Dalton Pearson
Software Systems Engineer at HMB Development
Real User
Top 20
Linode Kubernetes Engine gives me better visibility than with Azure, and UI is more user-friendly

Pros and Cons

  • "When it comes to the Linode Kubernetes Engine and the amount of automation it provides, it's awesome, it's a game-changer. If a process randomly dies, it could take me a while to notice that it has died, if I haven't set up monitoring. With Kubernetes, it will just restart itself using Heartbeats."
  • "One thing that I'd really like to see is auto-scaling node pools for their Kubernetes. I don't think that they have that. That's a huge one and would be very helpful. Specifically, what I would like is auto-scaling node pools that would scale down to zero nodes, which is tricky. That's very important for certain use cases."

What is our primary use case?

I was using it primarily for virtual private servers. But recently they came out with the Kubernetes platform and most of what I do at my day job is Kubernetes engineering. I'm very familiar with it. I had wanted to switch all my personal projects over to Kubernetes, and it was really great when Linode finally came out with it. Now I'm using Linode for Kubernetes clusters. I still do hold some VPSs, but most of my stuff is on Kubernetes now. I don't use Linode at my day job. We use Azure for the same thing there, but I choose to use Linode for all my personal projects.

What is most valuable?

I like it because it gives me scalability but, that's true of Kubernetes in general. But I do really like that it is consistent with all the stuff that I regularly do in my day job with Azure, using Kubernetes. It's nice that I can easily transfer that over to Linode using their Kubernetes.

Linode Kubernetes Engine is pretty great when it comes to the amount of Terraforming and manual integrations. Kubernetes does a great job of staying running and looking after itself. I find with VPSs that, every once in a while, something will go down and I will have to restart it manually. With Kubernetes, that tends to happen a lot less. I also find maintenance to be a lot easier.

When it comes to the Linode Kubernetes Engine and the amount of automation it provides, it's awesome, it's a game-changer. If a process randomly dies, it could take me a while to notice that it has died, if I haven't set up monitoring. With Kubernetes, it will just restart itself using Heartbeats.

In addition, the visibility that the Linode Kubernetes Engine provides is awesome. It's better than some of the other cloud providers', such as  Azure which is one I work with specifically. I find the Linode version to be a lot more user-friendly. It feels like the Linode interface is designed by someone who actually uses the product, whereas with Azure, it doesn't necessarily feel like that. It feels like some things are user-hostile.

Another feature that is quite helpful for setting up servers is the StackScripts. I've used it to set up game servers, previously. They have a library of instantiation scripts that will set up an environment for you on a VPS, from scratch, with one click. There's a pretty large library too, so that's quite handy.

And the fact that Linode offers a relatively small, but well-focused set of cloud computing services is the reason to go with Linode. What they do, they do well, and they're slowly adding stuff. They were a little bit late to the game on Kubernetes, but their Kubernetes is incredibly solid, in my experience so far. It feels very stable and well thought out.

It's also important that Linode offers worldwide coverage via multiple data centers. I'm based around Toronto and they have a data center right in Toronto. It works very well for me. With other solutions, I often have to pick data centers in Chicago or the like.

What needs improvement?

One thing that I'd really like to see is auto-scaling node pools for their Kubernetes. I don't think that they have that. That's a huge one and would be very helpful. Specifically, what I would like is auto-scaling node pools that would scale down to zero nodes, which is tricky. That's very important for certain use cases. Azure does provide that functionality, although only recently, and it was quite buggy when Azure unreleased it.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Linode for about five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Linode is super-solid. I haven't really had any downtime in years. I may have had one drive failure, but that was a case where they just restarted it. They then sent me an email saying, "Hey, we had a drive failure. We've re-imaged, we've reloaded it from a backup and you're good to go now."

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I haven't used Linode at scale, but I don't see any issues in being able to scale it, especially with Kubernetes. In addition, although I don't use them all that much, the NodeBalancers seem to be a well-thought-out solution for scaling.

If I could convert my whole company over to Linode, I would in a heartbeat. That's obviously a tough sell. Personally, I might use it slightly more in the future, but not on a significant scale. If I were to ever go off and start my own company though, I would totally use Linode.

How are customer service and technical support?

Their support is great. It's probably the best support in the industry. I've barely had to deal with them because all their stuff is solid, but when I have interacted with them it has usually been them reaching out to me to let me know about an issue, rather than me reaching out to them. Usually it's them saying, "Hey, there was an issue, but it's fixed. We just wanted to let you know." That's pretty great.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is pretty straightforward. I was on Linode before I was a professional developer. I was on Google Cloud compute before I was on Linode, and I found the Google Cloud stuff to be incredibly complicated. Then I came to Linode and everything just started to make sense. The simplicity allowed me to build a lot of experience around server-hosting without getting bogged down at the door.

What was our ROI?

To some extent I have seen a return on my investment with Linode. The project that I have it's called Beerbase.ca, and it's a site that aggregates prices from the Ontario Beer Store. Here in Ontario, we have one company that handles all beer sales. My site crawls The Beer Store website daily, gets all the different prices, and then populates the database. Beerbase.ca displays them.

I haven't monetized the site, but the value that I get from it, is as a personal project, is that whenever I'm applying for jobs, it says a lot when I say, "Hey, this is my project that I've been running for years." People really like it. They think it's funny and it's gotten me in the door at just about every company that I've worked at. It has been the thing that has set me apart. The ROI there is huge, although it's intangible.

You could say that Linode has helped to accelerate innovation in beer pricing. I wouldn't say we're saving the world, but it's a fun, interesting project.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The biggest benefit of Linode is the pricing. It's the best deal in the business. When I look at the server bills from Azure compared to Linode, if I were to host a similar amount of stuff on Linode, it would just be a better deal, and it always has been. 

Another great aspect with Linode—and I don't know if they give this to everyone—is that they will often have discount codes, where you get $20 of free credit. That's the equivalent of four months of a Nanode (or nano node) which is the smallest server. That's incredible for getting something set up, and that is what initially got me onto Linode. Someone who I really respect was doing a sponsorship with Linode, but that person said he was using Linode even before he was sponsored by them. I thought, "Okay, I'll go give this a try. What do I have to lose? It's four months for free." But I never turned back. And even now, where I'm on Kubernetes and it would be trivial to switch providers, I have no intention of doing so.

I would recommend that people look at the Linode Kubernetes Engine because it allows you to better utilize all of the compute that you're paying for. With VPSs, you have to do a balancing game of having enough without paying for too much. But with Kubernetes, you can have all of your projects on one cluster and just add nodes as needed. That even improves the already good pricing from Linode.

Their pricing model is also very simple compared to Azure. I don't understand why Azure doesn't price things the way that Linode does. With Linode, it's very simple to get an idea of what something is going to cost you. By comparison, I regularly have to do estimates of pricing on Azure, and that is an exercise in futility. It's very complicated the way that Azure prices out their stuff.

That simplicity is very important to me because all of my personal projects are hosted on Linode. It does a very good job of giving you what you need quickly and getting out of the way; of not complicating things. It lets you just work on your thing so you can get it going quickly. With other cloud providers, there are all these configurations and "gotchas".

I save at least $100 a month with Linode. I don't host a lot there, but the Kubernetes clusters that I'd be looking at on Azure would be significantly more.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I tried Google Cloud, but I didn't really like it all that much. It was expensive and also quite complicated. I find Azure, AWS, and Google Cloud to all be a little bit over-complicated. Linode definitely feels like the best solution for someone who doesn't want to spend a lot of time dealing with their cloud provider. Sometimes it makes sense to go with Azure, especially if they're going to give you a ton of free credits to get you on their platform, in the startup stage. 

Linode's API is great, much better than the other providers' APIs. It's more convenient to use. I haven't used Linode's CLI, but I'm very happy to hear that they provide one.

For anyone who just wants a simple server host that does everything that the big companies do, but one where they actually care that their stuff is easy and convenient to use, and one whose pricing is good, Linode is definitely the way to go.

What other advice do I have?

My advice to others who are considering using Linode would depend on what industry or what field they're in. I'm primarily a systems engineer and I end up being a cross between DevOps and a regular backend engineer. For anyone who is on that career path, it's invaluable to do a project and learn to use the tools before you're in the actual industry. It gives you a huge head start. Linode is definitely the best way to go about it because it teaches you the fundamentals and it's a lot more intuitive than the other providers. It will help you out when learning it. From there, when you start at a company, no matter what provider they're using, the fundamentals that you learned using Linode will definitely pay off. 

Don't hesitate to try it and check out the Kubernetes, because that is very in-demand right now.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer:
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Andy Heathershaw
Software Developer at a tech vendor with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 5
Offers everything in one place: domains, servers, and object storage

Pros and Cons

  • "The fact that you can do any Linux distribution is great. You can try out any Linux distribution, even some of the more obscure ones, and they are always keeping them up-to-date. As soon as a new distribution comes out, it is on the platform pretty much the same day, which I find really helpful."
  • "They are already working on the firewalls and VLANs, which need improvement, and are now in beta. I am on the beta program for the firewalls, but I can't use it yet because they are only in Mumbai and Australia, and I am not in those data centres. This is the one thing that I have been waiting for almost since the day that I joined them, so it is nice that they are doing that. The VLANs will be an improvement as well, and I am keen and waiting for that."

What is our primary use case?

I run a small company as well as my own personal website. I am using their cloud servers for managing websites and the web applications that I develop applications. So, I use Linode both for development and hosting public applications on my website. I also use their object storage to store things, like backups and files, which I want to keep for safekeeping, but not on my personal laptops. 

How has it helped my organization?

I have benefited from their flexibility, the object storage particularly. I know that I have almost unlimited capacity there. I don't have to provision loads of storage, keep buying loads of hard drives, etc. It is just there and usable.

What is most valuable?

The fact that you can do any Linux distribution is great. You can try out any Linux distribution, even some of the more obscure ones, and they are always keeping them up-to-date. As soon as a new distribution comes out, it is on the platform pretty much the same day, which I find really helpful.

What needs improvement?

The biggest room for improvement would be the object storage, bringing that to more data centres. At the moment, it's only in three of their many data centres.

They are already working on the firewalls and VLANs, which need improvement, and are now in beta. I am on the beta program for the firewalls, but I can't use it yet because they are only in Mumbai and Australia, and I am not in those data centres. This is the one thing that I have been waiting for almost since the day that I joined them, so it is nice that they are doing that. The VLANs will be an improvement as well, and I am keen and waiting for that. 

Another improvement would be on the server side, e.g., if they could support non-Linux OSs, like FreeBSD or even Windows. I heard a rumor that they might be looking at doing this. I understand that they have been focused on Linux their entire lifetime, so this would be a big change for them.

For how long have I used the solution?

I found out about Linode in 2015. I used them for a couple of years, then I moved to another provider back in the UK. I came back to Linode in April 2019. So, I have been back with them for a couple of years, but I have always kept up with them within that time, helping out on the community and things like that.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is very stable. I have never had a problem with the system because they are in different data centres, which makes it a bit more stable. For example, if there is a problem in Atlanta, that is not going to affect me in the UK. In terms of their global network, I have never had a problem. So, I find them really stable and reliable.

It has server maintenance. They give you the virtual server and manage the hardware in the machines for you, but it is up to the customers to manage the patches, the operating system, and install the applications. This is no real maintenance needed other than managing the service yourself. Obviously, they manage the object storage, make sure there is always enough space, and that the network is performing well.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I don't see scalability being an issue. I don't use the full scalability yet, but I know that there is room to grow. The Linode plans that they have allow you to go up to really high amounts of RAM and CPU, so they must have a lot of capacity. On the object storage side, there is virtually unlimited capacity to use from our perspective. So, they are really scalable. They have built a good platform to take them forward. They do focus on a small, few features within the platform, giving them that advantage over other competitors, like AWS, who has just a massive sprawling infrastructure. Instead, Linode focuses on building their platform out to make it great.

I am using a dedicated CPU node for my production environment, website, and some other applications. Then, I have another smaller instance for development. I also have object storage and quite a bit of data. I have about 20 gigs worth of data on domains that I am using as well, so pretty much all my domains are on it in terms of DNS management. Therefore, the only thing that I am not using is Kubernetes, and I am just not at that stage yet where I need it. However, as far as the servers are concerned, I will be using those when the firewalls come in. When the VLANs come in, I will be using that as well. I would like to think that I am using quite a bit of their platform.

How are customer service and technical support?

Their support team is just fantastic and phenomenal. They are always helpful and always there. They are one of the only cloud providers who give phone support, and even outside of the US. I know if I have got a problem that I can just pick the phone up and call them. The support team is probably the number one selling point for me. 

  • I had a ticket the other day where they responded within about 20 minutes. 
  • I have had them respond when it has been the middle of the night in the UK. So, they are very responsive and friendly. They know what they are talking about. 
  • I have had cases where I have had tickets that have been resolved within the first update from the support team. 

They are brilliant compared to other providers. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I was with DigitalOcean a few years ago, and I just didn't find their support team very helpful. I got the impression they were reading from a script. Whereas, the Linode support team understands, cares, and wants to help you get to a solution.

There is a company called Memset in the UK, who is now a part of the iomart Group, and I used them for a few years. I have used Azure and AWS as well.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very straightforward. It is just setting the server up, then you will have your server within a few minutes. They give you the IP address and all the network information. I don't think it could be any simpler. Even in terms of creating a new block volume for servers, it gives you all the config instructions on how to add them and use them. I don't think there is any room for improvement there. It is already pretty great.

What about the implementation team?

The only bit that is a bit manual is adding the IPv6 address ranges. That is still a manual thing, where you have to ask the support team to allocate you a new range. That is only a minor thing. However, you get an IPv6 address with the server anyway, so it is not too much of an issue.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Pricing-wise, I find it simple in that they give you a monthly fee, but they also charge it hourly. So, if you are using the service for a small part of the month, then you are only paying for that small amount instead of a whole month, like with other providers. It is a flat monthly fee if you use the service for the entire month. It just makes things so simple. Because they are focusing on Linux, you don't have to worry about licensing costs of Windows and things like that. So, the price that they give you is the price that you need to pay each month. I just find it so simple compared to the likes of AWS and Azure. It is nice, easy, and predictable. I know exactly what I am going to be paying each month and what resources I get for that price.

They offer a Managed plan, which isn't of interest to me at the moment. I do all the maintenance myself. However, I know that is there if I need it. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

In my day-to-day job, I work with both Azure and AWS, which are just so complicated. There are so many different services. If you want to do one thing, then it is like, "Yeah, we have a service for that, but it's going to cost you," and if you want to do something else, "There is another service, and that is going to cost you." Whereas, Linode, which is my main virtual server, is $20 a month ($25 with backups) and that is all I will pay regardless of how much I use it. That is a massive thing for them - the fact that you know exactly what you are getting. You are not bamboozled with all the different service names, etc. I find that really good.

I wouldn't even touch AWS or Azure for my own work. I have only used them through my day-to-day company for my own personal hosting of my business. They would just be three or four times the price of Linode.

There is no other company that I have found which can match the responsiveness and helpfulness of the Linode support team. 

The availability of their hardware: Linode uses newer AMD processors. A lot of other clouds are only just catching up with that, but they have been using them for a couple of years. 

The quality of the hardware is a big thing. Linode offers everything in one place. They offer domains, servers, and object storage, and now they are bringing in firewalls. I can get all that from one provider. Whereas, with other hosting companies, you get the service from one company, but they don't do DNS. You need to get the DNS as well as the object storage from somewhere else. So, there is no reason why I would go anywhere else.

What other advice do I have?

Quite simply, go for it. I don't think you will be disappointed. Linode offers everything in one go. The support team is on-hand, even if you are not a paying customer yet. If you are just on a free trial or the inclusive credit that Linode offers, you will still get exactly the same support as if you were a paying customer.

It is definitely important that Linode offers worldwide coverage via multiple data centres. I am not taking full advantage of that at the moment. However, I plan to as my business gets bigger, putting service closer to customers wherever they are in the world. It is definitely a plus point that they are worldwide.

I have looked into the Linode Kubernetes Engine. However, at the moment, the virtual servers are a better fit for me. I am just not at that scale where I need the containers.

I absolutely can see that they will help us to grow and progress.

I would rate Linode as 10 out of 10. There are things for improvement, but they are working on them. I think they are only going to get better than what they are now. For me, they are the leading provider for the typical, everyday hosting needs.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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SV
Managing Director & Lead Software Developer at BASX Software Development
Real User
Top 20
Responsive support, scales with our requirements, and the DNS management tool is helpful

Pros and Cons

  • "The virtual machine configuration tool is very helpful for setting up a new server or for modifying an existing server."
  • "They recently changed the web interface and although the older one did not look as good, the new one is less responsive."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use cases involve renting virtual private servers for our infrastructure, which is used for the development of software, website databases, websites, and some infrastructure such as for audio and video conferencing.

The main purpose for using their virtual private servers is for our in-house development program.

We use a Linux environment for our website database applications.

How has it helped my organization?

Linode has done a lot of help to us when it comes to streamlining anything where we need a server. Whether it is development servers or even servers for clients, Linode has helped us a lot.

It has helped us to accelerate our innovation, although there are similar services available so we didn't choose Linode mainly for that. Nonetheless, it certainly has helped because we don't have a core infrastructure. Obviously, all of the development that we do internally is happening on their server. This means that it's very important for our innovation and development, but other services would be able to compete with them, so it's not an exclusive advantage.

We choose Linode because they are very Linux-focused with their operating systems. It is very Linux-friendly and Linux-oriented. Mainly, in the end, it's all about vendor lock-in. If I compare it to Amazon and Google Cloud, they have a vendor lock-in, and we want to avoid that. This is something that Linode is very helpful with. They have a very standardized open system, which is easily configurable.

It is difficult for me to assess the price to performance ratio of Linode compared to other product providers because I don't have much experience with them. But, at least compared to our self-hosted servers, I think they have very good uptime and response time.

What is most valuable?

The DNS management tool is helpful. 

The virtual machine configuration tool is very helpful for setting up a new server or for modifying an existing server. It works very reliably.

It is very important that Linode offers a well-focused set of cloud computing services. They have a lot of options for different products which work well together. I saw the extended steps that products provide in the past, but I don't see a need to expand it anymore. I think it's perfect as it is right now.

I find it important that they offer worldwide coverage using multiple data centers, but from my point of view, they already have very good coverage. For example, here in Thailand, which is in the Asia region, it could cover Singapore, Japan, and also a little bit of Europe. It's important because we deal with a lot of international clients, but there is no need to extend these exhaustively. They are very well set up already.

What needs improvement?

They recently changed the web interface and although the older one did not look as good, the new one is less responsive. For example, when you changed something, it was instant. The new interface was really bad when it was first released, and it has improved, yet it is still not as responsive as the older one. I have considered whether being in Thailand makes a difference, although it is still a relative comparison. This is something that I have written an email to them about, and they are working on improving it.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Linode for two and a half years.

We use the Virtual Private Server (VPS).

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

In general, the stability is very good. However, there was recently a nasty problem in Singapore, and it seems to have service interruptions more now than in the past. I think that at some point in time, they will upgrade the Singapore data center and the stability will improve. For us, it's not really relevant because we don't have large scale, or clients in large numbers, and not around the clock. Ultimately, the interruptions don't affect us too much.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Our company's scalability is perfect because we can just upgrade to the next level of server available. Within 10 to 15 minutes, it will upgrade and everything is there. Even if we grow a lot over time, their servers are still big enough for our requirements. We wouldn't need anything on the level of Amazon or Google Cloud.

There are only two people in the company who are involved with the servers.

We use Linode for all our servers, with respect to ones which we host in-house or host for clients in-house. So if we need a commercial VM, we will set up a new Linode. From that point of view, it is sufficient for our use case.

In the future, if we increase usage it will be mostly for new clients that need database applications, cloud space, servers, or more resources. I expect it would be a steady but low increase in the resources that we need.

In terms of end-users, it is difficult to estimate how many use it because there are several websites and databases. There are probably no more than 100 in total, which includes all of our customers.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have been in contact with technical support a few times. It was always via email and they were very responsive. There is nothing to complain about when it comes to their support.

I'm certainly thankful for their support, which always has a human answering my inquiries. I find that Linode is very good because when I've sent an inquiry, it's almost always dealt with by a human and it doesn't involve working with FAQs or automated responses. I find that very good. It is important because, with most issues, I can resolve them myself. It is only the very high-level technical issues that I have no idea about and need support for. It is very good compared to other services, especially Google. With other services, it is sometimes very difficult to get a human to respond to your inquiry.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Prior to Linode, we only had in-house servers. I started using Linode more intensively when we opened the company in Thailand, almost three years ago.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is very straightforward. It is perfect, although I might ask for more configuration options, making the setup a bit more complex. For now, however, it is fine.

Normally, the initial deployment takes between five and ten minutes. Using the web interface, it is very fast to deploy. However, afterward, I need to check the parameters. This is something that I think could be improved if they allow a few more options through the web interface.

In terms of an implementation strategy, we didn't really have one because we don't have many servers. We only have a handful, so at this point, we just get a new Linode when we need a new one because our capacity is full. There are a few things that need to be done such as changing the root password, setting up additional system users, installing a few packages, and setting up standardized software for our company. However, we don't have any official documentation for the steps we follow.

What about the implementation team?

I take care of the deployment for each Linode, and I have another person who supports me with the maintenance. We try to optimize everything as much as possible, especially in the maintenance phase. I also set up the updates as part of this effort.

The maintenance involves just logging in, doing some checks, and running some maintenance scripts. It's a new product, so this is part of our manual monitoring.

What was our ROI?

We see a return on investment in terms of time saved for managing our infrastructure.

If I compare to in-house servers, we don't save a great deal of time. I would estimate a 10% time savings in general and slightly more for setup and maintenance. Over time, it would become pretty substantial.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Linode has very good pricing. There might be something a little bit cheaper but I find it very fair and competitive, and nothing to complain about. Given the broad set of choices and options, I wouldn't ask for cheaper prices.

I find a simple pricing model important, and I think that's also one of the reasons why we decided on Linode. I'm paying a simple, per-hour rate for the service, with no automatic scaling-up of the pricing. This is extremely important because, with Google Cloud and Amazon, part of their infrastructure does bill based on usage. We didn't want this but instead, wanted to be billed on a fixed monthly rate. This allows us to keep an eye on the monthly fixed costs. It puts us more in control.

We have a few instances where we use a lot of resources on a few servers, and with the fixed price, I think that we save money compared to other cloud-hosting providers who bill according to usage. Even if we don't save much money, it allows us to plan very well ahead.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

When we set up the company, we took a look at the options for commercial providers and we decided on Linode. These included Amazon, Google Cloud, DigitalOcean, and a new, smaller local one, based in Switzerland in Europe, which is where our mother company was created. The one that compared most closely was DigitalOcean.

I don't recall all of the details but we found from reviews that Linode had better support for Linux, and it is more developer-friendly. This may have changed over the past three years, but when it was time to choose, these were deciding factors.

We also knew about Microsoft Azure, but they didn't have good Linux support at that time. As such, we didn't look at them further.

What other advice do I have?

The biggest lesson that I have learned from using Linode is the importance of stepping up production-ready infrastructure.

My advice for anybody who is implementing Linode is to start with a small server, work with it, and then scale up later. This works well because scaling up is really easy. If you plan on very large infrastructure, conduct a PoC first. In the case where you are just hosting websites, you can start with the resources for 100 or 200 users, and then scale up as the demand increases or the size of your company or user base increases.

In summary, this is a product that meets all of my expectations for a cloud service in terms of functionality, scale, and pricing. It is perfect for our scale.

I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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TK
Security, Programming, Infrastructure Consultant at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Consultant
Top 10
Because of the way that their pricing model is set up, I can scale up or down the size of a customer's server very easily

Pros and Cons

  • "Because of the way that their pricing model is set up, I can scale up or down the size of a customer's server very easily. It makes life very easy for me when they run out of space, need more speed or RAM, etc. I can very easily pay the difference and reboot the machine, and now I have the upgrade that I wanted. That just makes it extremely simple."
  • "They could have more international servers. There are certain places throughout Europe and Eastern Europe which are very open to doing a lot of technology business, such as Romania. Romania is very open to technology. At other service providers, I have stuff in Romania. I think there are some Eastern European locations that would be more open to it. So, if they could have more European points of presence, that would be more helpful."

What is our primary use case?

I am generally using them for bringing up websites and servers for customers. Oftentimes, a company will want their own mail server and/or web server, and I will use Linode for that. It is extremely convenient and easy for me to do this. I really like how they are set up. They just seem to do everything right.

How has it helped my organization?

It is a very cost-effective solution. It allows me to give high availability. Having it be a VM instead of a dedicated piece of hardware is extremely valuable in the fact that they are very proactive about their monitoring. There have been several times where I have seen them migrate a VM from a server that was having problems onto a new server. I have had that happen a couple of times over the years that I have been with Linode.

The service has helped our organization accelerate innovation because, in certain cases, I have wanted to try something new. So, I would just spin up a VM briefly for a short period of time to try some things on it and see how it worked, then I could just turn it off again. It basically made me a rapid prototyping environment so I could try new things and get stuff working pretty quickly.

What needs improvement?

Linode offers worldwide coverage via multiple data centers, which is very important to me. I would like to see more European offerings. I know they have Frankfurt available right now. I would personally like to see more data centers throughout Europe or Eastern Europe available.

They could have more international servers. There are certain places throughout Europe and Eastern Europe which are very open to doing a lot of technology business, such as Romania. Romania is very open to technology. At other service providers, I have stuff in Romania. I think there are some Eastern European locations that would be more open to it. So, if they could have more European points of presence, that would be more helpful.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using them for quite some time, at least five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

They are very stable. I am very pleased. I have always experienced good stability with their stuff. For the servers that I have used, they have always been very stable. I have always noticed them to be very proactive when they do detect a problem. Migration from there to a different server has always been rather quick. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is very easy because I can pay some money, reboot the machine, and now I have the upgrade. It is done. It is very simple. I am always pleased with that.

There are about 10 machines or so that are currently running. I have some customers who have two servers and others with one server.

How are customer service and technical support?

I don't often have to use their support because the machines are so stable. I may have to talk to support once a year, which is not very often at all. When I do deal with them, having it be 24/7 is not terribly critical to me because I usually only do this work during regular work hours anyway. I have noticed there have been times where towards the end of the day, I would create a ticket or be in a conversation with one of them, then they would answer me well after business hours and be available for that. However, in general, I haven't had to use their support a whole lot in the first place because it just runs and works.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have used a company in Europe called IntoVPS. Some of my colleagues have used Vultr. So, my friends and I have used a couple other services, but I keep coming back to Linode.

IntoVPS had offerings that were just incompatible. They were using Zen Solutions for a while, and I found compatibility issues with it. When I used them, they didn't seem to have a mature product offering that did what I wanted. I felt like I was always working around one of their limitations.

My other friends have used Vultr, and they're pretty happy with it. I have not set up anything personally for my own customers on Vultr yet, but from what I see and heard, they seem to like Vultr a lot too. Vultr has a lot of European points of presence. If I was going to sign up for a Vultr account, it would be because they have more locations in Europe than Linode does. That would be my only motivation at this point, since I don't have personal experience with them.

How was the initial setup?

Setting up with Linode is very easy. I will pick the size of the VM that I want and usually use a CentOS 7 distribution. Once I have that, I will usually just be able to run. If I am bringing something up that is sort of a cookie-cutter server, then I can run my Ansible scripts against it, then it is very rapid. In a matter of minutes, I can go from having nothing to having a functional server that I can log into and start putting the customer's data onto it.

The setup process is usually either:

  • Simply select the distribution and start using it.
  • Run some Ansible scripts to do some of those tasks ahead of time. 

It is extremely simple. One of the big things that I really like about Linode is how simple, quick, and easy the solution is to get working.

It takes less than a day to spin up an environment. I will go from having nothing to having a fully functional customer website or mail server. It takes less than a work day. In fact, it is usually about half a work day. I will do it in the afternoon. I will start the machine and configure it, then it will be done in a very short time. By the end of the day, it is done and working. I am ready for the customers' users to start using it. It is very quick.

What was our ROI?

Linode is a very high value for what you are paying. I have brought up a number of the $5 and $10 a month servers, and customers have generally been very happy with those. I am not expecting the world from the servers because they are only $5 or $10 a month servers, but I am not asking for too much from them. It really works out well. Even on low-end systems at $5 and $10 a month, it is very well done.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Because of the way that their pricing model is set up, I can scale up or down the size of a customer's server very easily. It makes life very easy for me when they run out of space, need more speed or RAM, etc. I can very easily pay the difference and reboot the machine, and now I have the upgrade that I wanted. That just makes it extremely simple.

It is important to me that the provider offers a relatively small, but well-focused, set of cloud computing services. I can start off a very small customer at $5 a month, then scale them up from there. I have done that numerous times. I started off a customer on a $10 month server, and now they are on a $80 month server. Being able to scale up like that is very valuable to me.

The pricing model is very simple. I like the simplicity of it, starting at $5, then doubling as it goes up from there. That is a brilliant idea, and it is not complex at all. It is about as dead simple as you can imagine. So, if you want to double what you have, then you double your price, pay the money, and reboot. It is done. It's that simple. You can't beat that.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

At this point in the game, Linode is pretty much the only VM provider that I recommend for my customers to use. It is the only place where I put stuff that I have out there for different customers. So, I am pretty sold on Linode. I have tried a couple of other services, but Linode is the one that I keep coming back to right now.

Looking at IntoVPS and what they provide, Linode is saving me money. I have found that IntoVPS has some strange pricing because they have a diverse offering of different virtualization technologies; there is too much to pick from. I would rather just have one thing that works properly, like Linode, and just use that. Compared to IntoVPS, Linode is much better. 

Compared to Vultr, it is pretty much almost exactly the same. The only thing that might be a difference is Linode has a range of compute servers where the Vultr offering for high-frequency compute nodes has a different pricing scheme. That is about the only difference.

A lot of these other providers out there really do not have their acts together. Linode has done a great job in simplifying everything to the point where it is just simple and easy. I learned to stick with what works, which is Linode.

What other advice do I have?

Go for it. I would recommend Linode. Don't be afraid to try out the cheaper, smaller systems for whatever you are running. Pick the system that meets your system requirements as best as possible, but you really can save. I would recommend it because you can save a lot of money as well as time and hassle.

I would rather pay just a little bit more and have a hassle-free operation than to pay less and be faced with support issues. I don't like having to deal with support. I don't like having to bring in anybody else to help me debug something. So, I look at Linode as everything just works. It is a very cheap price, depending on what you're getting. It can be scaled up and down very easily. So, it has exceptional value.

I would rate this solution as a 10 (out of 10).

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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