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Paul Dinapoli
Sr. Systems Engineer, Infrastructure at NWEA
Real User
Top 5
Improved our organization with its capacity planning

Pros and Cons

  • "It has improved our organization with its capacity planning. We have a performance environment that we use to benchmark our applications. We use it to say, "Okay, at a certain level of concurrency, we know where our application will fall over." Therefore, we are using LogicMonitor dashboards to tell us that we're good. Our platform can handle X number of clients concurrently hitting us at a time."
  • "The ease of use with data source tuning could be improved. That can get hairy quickly. When I reach out for help, it's usually around a data source or event source configuration. That can get challenging."

What is our primary use case?

We are using the solution for on-prem, all our applications, and network monitoring. It fits everything. We use it for monitoring and reporting on our ESX, Pure Storage, Cisco, F5, Palo Alto environments. We also use it for alerting, graphing, and capacity planning. We use it for everything.

We are using the latest version. We have LogicMonitor Collectors onsite in our data center, but the dashboard and everything else is all the cloud model. We use both AWS and Azure as our cloud providers.

How has it helped my organization?

It has improved our organization with its capacity planning. We have a performance environment that we use to benchmark our applications. We use it to say, "Okay, at a certain level of concurrency, we know where our application will fall over." Therefore, we are using LogicMonitor dashboards to tell us that we're good. Our platform can handle X number of clients concurrently hitting us at a time. That's how we use it to size our business, e.g., size our ESX environment and Internet pipes. 

Our capacity planning team consumes the data on the dashboards. The bread and butter of using the data in the dashboards is to inform, "Hey, what upgrades do we need to make in six months?" So, that data gets consumed regularly by other teams.

In the three and a half years that I've been using it, we haven't had false positives. I'm the primary network engineer, so I can say with confidence, "We have the environment tuned to the point where we don't get false positives."

What is most valuable?

Its historical reporting: I can go into my production F5s and look at the CPU, memory transactions, application transactions, and bandwidth utilization. Then, I can use all of the graphing metrics. I can have a dashboard for my production environment and all of my critical elements where I can graph utilization over time and use it for capacity planning. It's a single pane of glass for everything about your environment health.

We build our own dashboards, creating dashboards for our various environments. It is all written in HTML5, so it's super easy to drag and drop, move things around, expand, and change dates. It's awesome. We can get as detailed as we want or roll up to a manager/director level. I like its ease of use.

I don't do much with reporting because the dashboards are good enough that they tell the story. I haven't actually clicked on the reports tab in quite a while, so we're probably under utilizing that. If you just go into a dashboard, and say, "Show me my F5 health for the last six months," the dashboard is good enough for that.

I have custom data sources for various things. With data sources, you can go down the rabbit hole real quick because they're very powerful. You can go to the LM Exchange, grab data sources, pull them down and put them into your installation, and then you can tweak them. The idea of a data source is that it matches. For example, if I have a collection of Cisco devices along with a collection of F5 and Palo Alto. There's a generic match criteria which says, "Is a Cisco. Is an F5. Is a Palo Alto." However, it also has all these other match conditions. Therefore, you can build Redex filters or match on 10 Gigabit Ethernet, but not 1 Gigabit Ethernet. You can get super deep in the weeds, and it can get complicated pretty quick, but their support is fantastic. 

The solution provide us with granular alert-tuning for devices. E.g., I can use it for application website checks, where I can set up an automated check from a bunch of different test facilities. So if I want check my application, I can ping it from five locations. I can tune the data source so that if the millisecond response time is ever greater than 500 milliseconds, it lets me know. I also can tune it so it won't alert me on one fail, but alert me on three fails. For any data source that you're collecting for, you can set thresholds for notice, warning, critical, and what to do if it fails one, two, or three times. You can just go crazy tuning it.

We found the solution monitors most devices out-of-the-box, such as, F5, Cisco, Palo Alto, ESX, Pure Storage, Windows database connectors, ActiveBatch. and Rubrik.

What needs improvement?

The ease of use with data source tuning could be improved. That can get hairy quickly. When I reach out for help, it's usually around a data source or event source configuration. That can get challenging.

For how long have I used the solution?

I joined NWEA about three years ago and was new to LogicMonitor at that time. Three and a half years is how long I've been using it.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is perfect. It is 100 percent.

Right now, we're collectively administrating it across the organization at five or six people. It doesn't take day-to-day massaging.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have close to 50 users utilizing the solution. It's mostly a production/operations audience. My Ops team has a couple hundred people, but I doubt that many of them would be consuming the dashboards on a regular basis.

The product is extensively being used. It's completely a part of our production environment. We couldn't maintain our environment without it. It's production-impacting.

I've never been presented with a scenario where it didn't scale.

How are customer service and technical support?

Their support is fantastic. The support is always super friendly and helpful.

From the dashboard, you click support. You chat with an engineer, saying, "I'm trying to clone this data source that already exists and I want to tweak it so it only applies to interfaces with this tag." You can clone a data source, tweak it to match what you want, negate the things you don't want, and then you have a new data source. You can take all of their stuff out-of-the-box, and it generally works, then you tweak it as needed. So, data sources are pretty easy to use.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I think my team was using Nagios before. That's just a burning trash heap of an old application.

In my organization, as a whole, we have many chefs in the kitchen. We, the infrastructure team, picked LogicMonitor, then we moved all our stuff to it. However, the database team still relies on Nagios because they're like dinosaurs. DevOps uses Sensu Prometheus, collectd, SIEM, and a laundry list of others. The only reason why LogicMonitor hasn't consolidated is because our teams have the freedom to choose their own tools, and we do. Unfortunately, we tend to overspend on duplicate functionality. I don't think it's because LogicMonitor can't do it, but because the infrastructure team picked it, the Dev Ops team was like, "Well, that's your guys' tool. You guys use it. We're going to go pick our own thing." We were like, "Okay, go ahead.

How was the initial setup?

I know that we have added extra Collectors, and it's super simple. We get to a point where we have too many instances on a Collector and it starts working too hard because it's just a VM. So, we spin up another Linux VM, download their Collector code, install it, and then you have another Collector running in 30 minutes. It's pretty straightforward. We add collectors fairly regularly, and it's pretty easy.

I know getting it installed is not that big of a deal, but getting things migrated off of old stuff can be time consuming. However, I wasn't around for it.

If we were implementing LogicMonitor now, we would need to identify when to pull the plug on Nagios, then identify what we wanted to monitor so we were not running duplicates.

What about the implementation team?

One person is needed for a new LogicMonitor deployment.

What was our ROI?

We use LogicMonitor for our alerting and integrate it with PagerDuty for on-call paging. That is key to operational uptime. We live and die by the number of SEV-1, SEV-2, SEV-3, outages, and uptime. It is absolutely critical that LogicMonitor alerts PagerDuty, which alerts the on-call. We are reducing the impact of incidents using the tool by alerting for incidents that we can respond to.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I don't know what we spend on LogicMonitor, but I know that Cisco Prime is a multiple six-figure solution. Therefore, I know we are saving at least several hundred thousand dollars in that we're not buying Cisco Prime.

We pay for the enterprise tech support.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

The organization I came from had a huge SolarWinds deployment. We also used Nagios, Cacti, and OpenNMS, which is an open source NMS platform. Unfortunately, I've had to do some work with Cisco Prime as well, which used to be called Cisco Works. I installed Cisco Prime for a handful of clients in a past life.

  • Pros of LogicMonitor: Ease of installation and use. 
  • Cons. Tuning data sources can be a bit labor intensive. However, once you get it set up, it's pretty straightforward. 

Having worked with OpenNMS, Cisco Prime, and SolarWinds, just the cost and complexity of those solutions is ridiculous. I would never advocate going back to that black hole.

What other advice do I have?

We're fairly self-sufficient. We already use Puppet for automation, and we're starting to move some workloads to Ansible. However, we wouldn't ask LogicMonitor to help us with automation.

Biggest lesson learnt: Know what you want to monitor and what threshold you want to alert from. E.g., if you don't do anything and just start monitoring out-of-the-box, it works. However, if you don't set thresholds, it's not telling you when to take action. So, if you just add things to LM and start monitoring them, you're not done. Until you've set a threshold for where something is actionable, you haven't really finished the job. That's my experience with NWEA. You can click on anything that we've been monitoring, and if you don't have any thresholds set, then you're just making pretty graphs.

I would rate the solution as a 10 (out of 10). I am a fan of the product. It's great.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
AP
Principal IT Consultant at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Consultant
Top 10
Granular alert-tuning allows us to monitor and get automated reports on vCPU per CPU percent, to help track VMs

Pros and Cons

  • "I really appreciate the reporting function because it allows me to create dashboards that will be emailed to me during the morning so that I have a complete overview of my client's health, within a specific time frame."
  • "The process of upgrading some of the collectors has been a little bit confusing. I need to understand that better."

What is our primary use case?

Right now we have two or three clients that have medium to large data centers, and we use LogicMonitor to give us an overview of the status of the infrastructure: if there are any holes or any issues either with memory, CPU, or storage devices, such as how much storage is consumed. 

One of them is an insurance company which has a presence here in Puerto Rico and in the U.S. It employs about 5,000 people and has two data centers in Puerto Rico and two more in Florida. Their main data center is in Atlanta with disaster recovery in North Carolina. That one is what I would consider a large environment. We also have a medium-size company in the communications area here in Puerto Rico and has about 2,000 employees. It covers all of Puerto Rico. We monitor their infrastructure in terms of servers, storage, and backups, among other things.

We are also monitoring things such as vCenter, its data infrastructure, and NetScaler networking cards. We have a complete overview of the health of the client at a specific moment. 

We're using the SaaS solution. Everything resides on the LogicMonitor cloud. We just have connectors to extract the data from different servers that we have.

How has it helped my organization?

It keeps us informed whenever we have an issue. Once it's been configured and LogicMonitor is gathering the information through the connectors, it keeps me and my supervisor informed of any issue on the customer's platform. Sometimes they don't notify us if they're going to reboot a server, so we get notified whenever the server is rebooted. Or if there is a server having memory processor or storage problems, it keeps us one step ahead of such situations. If they call us and say that they have a problem, we can say, "We noticed that you rebooted the server," so it gives us an advantage.

The solution provides granular alert-tuning for devices. For example, in virtual environments you have to take into consideration that the virtual machines have available vCPUs. There is a specific metric called "vCPU per CPU percent" and we monitor that data point because it will let us know whenever we have too many virtual machines for the available CPUs on a hypervisor. That has helped us a lot. We do automatic reports on that every morning, just to check how the virtual environment is behaving in terms of the availability of vCPUs.

We also use its AIOps for root cause analysis and it is very good. We do have to adjust the thresholds at times for specific points that we are looking for, but once that is done, it works like a charm. We have no issue with that at all. We get the alerts we want at the time that we need them. This definitely helps us to be more proactive in resolving issues and preventing problems because we don't have to waste time entering, for example, vCenter to look for metrics. Checking one of the clients could easily take me more than an hour, just to check that everything is fine. With LogicMonitor, we receive the alerts whenever there is an issue and that allows us to work more easily and be more proactive instead of being reactive.

It has also helped us to automate. Depending on the kind of alerts, the person who works in a specific area is notified, so I don't get all the alerts myself. We have storage, virtual infrastructure, and Citrix. So whenever there is an issue with Citrix, the person from Citrix is notified. If it is with storage or infrastructure, the right person is notified.

In the morning, without LogicMonitor, it could take about an hour to an hour and a half to go through every system. Right now, I just check my dashboards and I know if there's something that needs to be addressed. Most of the time we get notified either by email or by SMS if there is something that we need to take care of, in terms of infrastructure and storage. Looking at the dashboard takes about 15 minutes and we know that everything is working fine.

What is most valuable?

There are at least two most valuable features for us. I really appreciate the reporting function because it allows me to create dashboards that will be emailed to me during the morning so that I have a complete overview of my client's health, within a specific time frame.

One of the dashboards I use a lot is the storage dashboard. We migrated recently from one storage to another, and it allows me to keep everything in focus: How much space am I using, how much is being compressed, how much is being deduplicated? It also provides predictive functionality: How long will it take to fill this disk? That helps us to make decisions on whether we need to buy more space or we need to move or rearrange something within our storage infrastructure. I like that dashboard very much.

The other valuable feature is the alerts. We receive alerts by email and SMS with escalation schemes, so if we notice that an issue is not addressed in a specific amount of time, it will escalate to the next person in the chain. We can rest assured that specific problems are resolved within a specific time frame. Because we receive the alerts by email and SMS, whether I am at my computer or not, I will still receive the messages through SMS on my phone. That is a really cool feature.

In terms of the overall reporting of LogicMonitor, at first it was a little bit confusing. But once you get the hang of it, it's pretty easy to add the widgets and arrange the information that you need or to filter it. It's pretty easy to use.

What needs improvement?

The process of upgrading some of the collectors has been a little bit confusing. I need to understand that better.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using LogicMonitor for about three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's pretty stable. I haven't had issues with the collectors being disconnected. Whenever I see that there is no data flowing from the environment to LogicMonitor, it is mostly because somebody has changed a password on the host or on my host. As soon as I fix it, everything just keeps on working, straight up.

I believe we've only had an issue where a collector disconnected from the cloud. It happened to my supervisor and he just removed the collector and installed a new one and everything has been working out fine since. The solution's ability to alert whenever we have a disconnection of the collector to the cloud is an advantage.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It has pretty good scalability. We have added several servers and I haven't seen any problems or issues at all.

The topic of increasing our use of LogicMonitor is being discussed, but it's mostly my manager discussing it with the group of managers and the owner of the company. I am not aware of any plans, but it has been mentioned that there is a possibility of expanding.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't used LogicMonitor's technical support. Every time that I need to validate or make some changes in a configuration, the support page is pretty helpful. I have found the answers to all my questions there, so I haven't needed to contact support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I don't believe the company had a previous solution.

How was the initial setup?

I wasn't involved in the initial deployment. However, in terms of configuration, I have done many rearrangements of specific hardware and discovery of new equipment. That was pretty easy. It didn't take that much for the configuration, mostly for storage or infrastructure, like hypervisors. It was pretty straightforward. The Help page is pretty straightforward too. You will find what you're looking for.

LogicMonitor monitors most devices out-of-the-box. I was pretty amazed with all the documentation on how to configure specific hardware, like Citrix NetScaler ADC and PureStorage FlashArray. Those were pretty easy to configure. Other things it was able to monitor out-of-the-box include Veeam Backup, NetBackup, VMware, Windows Server — all the versions that we're using are supported — SQL Server, Linux servers, Red Hat, Oracle. Those are a few that come to mind.

What was our ROI?

I believe we have seen return on our investment because we are receiving alerts and dashboards for specific time frames, so whenever there is a problem with some part of the infrastructure, we're able to provide the customer with valid information on what's happening and what was happening. It allows us to document things whenever root cause analysis is required for an issue.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I don't know much about the pricing. My manager handles that. But I believe that, at least from his comments, the pricing is pretty reasonable for the licensing that we have.

What other advice do I have?

The big lesson I have learned from using LogicMonitor is to pay attention to the alerts we receive. Things get escalated to me whenever guys from the other teams do not acknowledge their alerts. I need to pay attention to those because they will tell us whenever a computer or server is being rebooted or if the drives are getting full.

There are six of us in my company on the services and support side. My manager is the person who actually configures it. In addition to me, there is the principal IT consultant for services and support. I do mostly storage and power infrastructure, in terms of servers. We have two more guys who work with Citrix. And there is another guy who does mostly networking. He works mostly with NetScaler ADC.

I give LogicMonitor 10 out of 10. From the time that I started using it, I haven't had any issues with the software at all. I get notified whenever they're doing upgrades and, whenever I need to do an upgrade to my collectors, I get the information with plenty of time to make arrangements if there is something else that needs to be done. I don't believe there have been any upgrade procedures have been done on the platform that have impacted us in any way. It's been a really stable and trustworthy platform.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Learn what your peers think about LogicMonitor. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2021.
552,695 professionals have used our research since 2012.
ManishArora
Vice President at Bypass Network Services
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
You can bring up your hardware and software stats in a single windowpane

Pros and Cons

  • "Whenever we reach out to our customers, we give LogicMonitor as a dashboard to them so they don't need to monitor the hardware side separately. For example, if my service is running on their hardware X, that means they don't need to monitor hardware X and our services too. LogicMonitor has the capability of monitoring their hardware as well as our services. This is how LogicMonitor helps us."
  • "We are working with LogicMonitor to get flexibility to see the absolute running numbers, rather than doing an average. They can keep the average for customers who want it, but there should be a way to at least show the real numbers, which are coming every second on the screen."

What is our primary use case?

If I summarize LogicMonitor, it is a single windowpane. You don't have to run four hardware stats and software stats on multiple screens during the monitoring of services. It gives you flexibility. It has the capability to pull up your data sources as well. So, it is like a single window, where you can see all your resources recorded, e.g., what value are you deriving out of your software?

We have our own product that we are specialized in. We needed something to help us with the setting up of the monitoring part.

Our customers are very happy. They are running Dell EMC hardware, so they don't need a Dell EMC monitoring window and our software windows. With LogicMonitor, they can see what is happening inside Dell EMC in a single, unified view that completely monitors their alerts.

How has it helped my organization?

We have some customers who are running a mix of Dell EMC, HPE, and Cisco hardware. We have our own software, as a service organization. We don't sell hardware. Whenever we reach out to our customers, we give LogicMonitor as a dashboard to them so they don't need to monitor the hardware side separately. For example, if my service is running on their hardware X, that means they don't need to monitor hardware X and our services too. LogicMonitor has the capability of monitoring their hardware as well as our services. This is how LogicMonitor helps us.

LogicMonitor has the ability to alert us if the cloud loses contact with on-prem collectors. We have more than 50 on-prem collectors, and there is the flexibility of putting an escalation chain to every collector. So, if a collector goes down, then whatever escalation mechanism is bound to that particular collector can fire. For example:

  • If an email has been attached to that collector, that email will come. 
  • If a call is attached, that call comes via mobile. 
  • If an SMS is there, then that SMS comes via mobile. 
  • Third-party external integrations over PagerDuty or any HTTP delivery also happen because they have the ability to send alerts through Slack as well.

What is most valuable?

We use the LogicMonitor dashboards with a couple of widgets. We have some custom dashboards as well. The CPU and memory usage dashboards are very cool to run, because if the hardware is intact, then your hardware services are working fine. 

We have around six to seven customers working with customer data sources. It helps us give more reports to our customers. For example, the CPU and memory usage are standard dashboards which count how much memory and CPUs are working. However, there are certain things that our customers want from the application side, like how many signups you're doing. We created those data sources on LogicMonitor and helped our customers see the same dashboard on the same screen. This has helped us a lot.

The solution provides us with granular alert-tuning for devices. They have three thresholds out there: warning at 70, error at 80, and critical at 90. You can segregate whether you want to call it a warning, error, or critical. There is flexibility, and we are happy with that.

Go-to-market is very easy with LogicMonitor. Today, if my customer needs five dashboards of software and 10 dashboards of hardware, then I am capable of delivering that with LogicMonitor.

What needs improvement?

I would give reporting an eight out of 10. LogicMonitor takes the data from us and does an average on the graphs. So, it doesn't show the absolute case. This is one thing that is a pain and flaw with LogicMonitor. For whatever data that gets collected from the hardware, it shows the average of one minute. This is basically a pain because we don't know what is happening in those couple of seconds, because what you see is the last minute's average. For example, if there is a surge of over 100, we will not be able to see the 100. It will turn down to the average of 50 or 80. Then, it becomes a tug of war with customers, where we will say that it was because of a surge it closed at 120. They reply, "No, in the graph, it is showing 50. How can you say 120?" Then, we tell them, "No, LogicMonitor pushes the average out every minute." We keep some of our services at a threshold of about 100. Whenever the threshold crosses 100, then the service will fail. However, the graph never shows 100. The graph will show 50 or 80, because it is an average per minute.

We are working with LogicMonitor to get flexibility to see the absolute running numbers, rather than doing an average. They can keep the average for customers who want it, but there should be a way to at least show the real numbers, which are coming every second on the screen. This is not something new that we are asking for. There are a couple of freeware available in the market, Munin or WhatsUp Gold, which have these capabilities to show real, absolute numbers as well as the average, min, and max. What we get from LogicMonitor is only the average, min, and max. The absolute is not there.

We are not asking anything new or out-of-the-box from LogicMonitor. Our customers realize that these things are available in freeware versions in the market. Also, whatever is added as free should be a part of their paid subscription.

Everybody is moving onto their mobiles. In the last five years, the development of their mobile application has been very slow or non-existent. Whatever the improvements have been made, they were made on the desktop view. However, on the mobile side of it, it only has the monitoring. As an administrator, if I need to create a user, then I need to open a laptop or go to a desktop to create a user. I can't create a user from the mobile application.

For how long have I used the solution?

I just started using LogicMonitor.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is fine.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I don't see any challenges with scalability. Whatever my product is capable of delivering, LogicMonitor is delivering that too.

The users of this solution include my team members. They use the LogicMonitor Portal for customer account creation and credentials, such as changing a password or creating dashboards. Also, all our customers have read-only access for their dashboards.

We monitor close to 100 devices. We have plans to increase that usage in the future.

How are customer service and technical support?

The support is very good. We are happy with the kind of attention that we get from our customer service manager (CSM). 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

In 2016, we started off our organization. The same thing happened with LogicMonitor. The timing was that we were both startups at the same point in time, so we grew at the same pace. We never checked another competitor of LogicMonitor, and LogicMonitor was our first buy of its kind. We have been with LogicMonitor since day one.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very easy because they have product manuals and provide guidance. What they have maintained on their website is very concise and their team is very eager to help as well.

If I go through their manuals and website, they cover a lot of devices out-of-the-box, including Cisco and even customized development.

LogicMonitor has a long list of OEMs that they can monitor and service, like Barracuda, Fortinet, FortiGate, and Cisco.

What was our ROI?

There is no ROI. We are mitigating outages for our customers, but not really saving time.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

LogicMonitor is competitively priced at the same level as other vendors, like Datadog.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We have not tried another operator, like Datadog, or other solutions out there. We were early adopters with LogicMonitor, and we have stuck with it until this day.

It takes a lot of time to develop a data source to put on the LogicMonitor platform. It's not easy for us to plug out of LogicMonitor and plug into Datadog. Plugging out and plugging in will work only in cases where we are monitoring basic things like CPU memory, which comes with the default package. When it comes to custom data sources, LogicMonitor has given us the option to write a script that they can make visible in their dashboards. 

When I talk to competitors, like Datadog, they have their own ways of handling data. To consider switching, we would need to invest our time in understanding which formats work with their product and how that will impact our customers and their timelines.

What other advice do I have?

LogicMonitor has evolved drastically in the last couple of years. They have made a lot of changes and are moving very fast. They are getting accustomed to machine learning, AI, DevOps, etc.

Don't reinvent the wheel. Just concentrate on your business and put your monitoring on LogicMonitor.

The solution has helped consolidate the monitoring tools that we need to an extent. For example, if our customer is running an HPE machine and doesn't have a license for HPE monitoring, they can at least see the basic hygiene level of hardware through LogicMonitor.

In the last month, we deployed the agentless collectors. We are still in the phase of commissioning those devices, so I don't personally have any experience on this.

I would rate this solution as an eight (out of 10). 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Hybrid Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Google
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
MH
Senior Systems Integration Engineer at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
MSP
Top 10
REST API enables us to automate processes, such as customer onboarding, saving significant time

Pros and Cons

  • "It has a REST API that is full-featured. It allows for a lot of custom work. It also supports Groovy and PowerShell scripting for its logic modules, so that's another area that allows for a lot of flexibility."
  • "Reporting is definitely a weak area in LogicMonitor. There's just not as much flexibility as there is in other areas of the product. Some of this can be overcome by using the REST API, but more of it should be out-of-the-box."

What is our primary use case?

We provide IT services to other companies. We use LogicMonitor to monitor our customers', and our own, IT infrastructures, regardless of where they're hosted.

How has it helped my organization?

Using the REST API we were able to write a custom application to speed up the process of onboarding customers. That's an example of how the solution has helped us to automate. We also use the REST API to generate custom reporting automatically. We don't have to click and click, and then click again, to export. 

The automation has likely increased productivity and saved us time. We can generate reports to say, for example, here are the customers or the sets of devices that have generated the highest number of alerts in a particular period. Let's focus on those so that once we clear them out we don't have to spend time working on them anymore. It also saves time in that an engineer doesn't need to spend half an hour or more to onboard a customer. It takes seconds, which means that they can move on to other tasks.

We use the solution's ability to customize data sources all the time. LogicMonitor does a good job of identifying best-practices or recommended thresholds for alerting. But we have many customers and they have different requirements. We use that customization, for example, to change the thresholds at which alerts are generated. Customer "A" may care about a situation where a disk goes below a certain percentage, but customer "B" doesn't. We can easily have different values between them. It also gives us the ability to write data sources to cover very specific use cases at a particular customer. Maybe that customer cares about whether a particular path has 10 files in it or 50 files. We can do a lot of customization based on whatever the requirements are.

Also, LogicMonitor's ability to alert if the cloud loses contact with on-prem collectors is another method for knowing, for example, if there's a problem with a collector or with a particular location; maybe the internet has gone down.

It has also definitely consolidated the monitoring tools we need. We used Microsoft System Center Operations Manager, SolarWinds Orion, N-central from N-able, and Kaseya.

The number of false positives has been reduced using LogicMonitor compared to how many we were getting with other monitoring platforms. The ability to fine-tune alerting helps achieve that goal.

What is most valuable?

Dynamic thresholds are pretty nice. They allow you to detect anomalous states better. Sometimes, for example, a resource like CPU will be used a lot by a server during a particular action, but that's a known action. Without dynamic thresholds, the server would generate an alarm every time the CPU went above that threshold. But if you know that it's going to be above that threshold at a particular time, then you can ignore that automatically.

It has a REST API that is full-featured. It allows for a lot of custom work. It also supports Groovy and PowerShell scripting for its logic modules, so that's another area that allows for a lot of flexibility.

We do use the dashboards although I, personally, don't use them a lot. But they are useful for allowing our customers access to information about the health of their infrastructure.

In addition, its ability to visualize and understand potential issues in systems is good. It's straightforward. It enables us to be more proactive in resolving issues. 

What needs improvement?

Reporting is definitely a weak area in LogicMonitor. There's just not as much flexibility as there is in other areas of the product. Some of this can be overcome by using the REST API, but more of it should be out-of-the-box.

Also — I know that they're working on this — a situation can arise when you have a logic module and you change the devices to which it applies. Now the version in their repository is different from the one that you've downloaded, even though it's essentially the same. You made a very minor change. So when you look for new data sources or logic modules, that one will show up as being different. And you have to go in and say, "Oh wait, no, it's not really different. It's just that I changed the 'Applies To'". Or say you've made a change to a threshold on a data source. It may be that LogicMonitor updates the data-gathering method for that. There's no good way to import the update without overriding the changes that you've made. That can be difficult.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using LogicMonitor for about four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's highly stable. Occasionally there will be an issue with a collector, but LogicMonitor is quick to acknowledge bugs. There are regular collector releases, several times a year, to address bugs and improve performance or add new features.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's scalable. We haven't had any issues with that. It's backed by a scalable platform, so there are very limited problems with scaling. There are some areas where they might be able to tune performance a little more. But other than that, we haven't had any issues.

We monitor in the vicinity of 15,000 to 20,000 devices with LogicMonitor. It covers nearly 100 percent of what we monitor.

This is our primary monitoring tool. We use a second, remote RMM tool on some devices, but very little monitoring is done with that tool. And it's only done in cases where that particular monitoring will trigger another action in that same tool.

How are customer service and technical support?

Over the last four years there have been some ebbs and flows in the quality of technical support. Overall, I'm satisfied. 

Over that four years, the trend is that it's been improving, with some dips along the way. When those happen, they're typically around the responsiveness. A ticket might sit longer than maybe it should, but generally, the support folks know their product and when they don't, they have internal resources to engage who can answer those questions.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We consolidated, and switched from the products we were using, due to reduced costs and improved workflow: Not having to watch multiple applications is more efficient.

How was the initial setup?

The setup is pretty straightforward. At its most basic, the process is to deploy a collector, and it's very simple. You download the executable, you run it, and you have a collector. You tell it: Here are some IPs, go monitor them. That's very straightforward. There's no agent to deploy on every device. There's no certificates to manage or anything like that.

LogicMonitor monitors most devices out-of-the-box. We probably have one of almost everything under monitoring: servers from all kinds of vendors, storage, and network. There are too many to list. When I say "one of almost everything," that's not much of an exaggeration. It's able to monitor almost everything out-of-the-box. There may be a couple where we have to write something to customize it. The percentage where that happens is so small. We do write custom monitoring in scenarios where we need different data than LogicMonitor provides out-of-the-box, but it still has the capability to monitor that device or that device type, right from the beginning.

We were consolidating many products at the time. We used a phased approach, so I can't really say how long it took, but each tool that we were replacing happened relatively fast and was relatively straightforward. Each one had a different number of customers using it and a different number of devices inside that needed to be moved over to LogicMonitor, and different customer requirements. Customer "A" might say, "Yes, you can go ahead and do it. No problem." Customer "B" might say, "Well, we've only got 10 servers, but you have to do it only on the second Tuesday of the month when it's a full moon."

For each existing tool, we looked at what devices were present, validated that we should be monitoring them, and communicated with the customer the plan to deploy a collector, typically on a custom, physical device. Then we just imported the devices' IPs and credentials into LogicMonitor and let them run side-by-side for a little while, to help the customers gain confidence in the product. Then, we shut down the monitoring in the old system. Sometimes that meant removing an agent or deleting an IP from one of the monitoring tools.

We have a team specifically dedicated to deployment of LogicMonitor. We don't have a team specifically dedicated to maintaining it. We have several operations teams. If, for example, the collector needs to be patched, there's a team that would patch that and they'd just do that as part of their normal patching of other infrastructure devices.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

My understanding is that the LogicMonitor is not the least expensive tool, but you get what you pay for, so it's probably worth it.

What other advice do I have?

Utilize the REST API. Learn how to learn how to do that. And you have to have folks who can create custom logic modules.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Tom Shepherd
Technical Architect at Computerworld Group
Reseller
Top 5
Being able to fine tune alerts allows us to be more efficient and get less false positives

Pros and Cons

  • "The solution has reduced our number of false positives compared to how many we were getting with other monitoring platforms. The fine tuning in LogicMonitor is one of the best features. Sometimes you install monitoring systems and they have a lot of chatter. You plug them in and suddenly your inbox is full with irrelevant information, whereas LogicMonitor is better at this out-of-the-box."
  • "It monitors most devices out-of-the-box, but not all. There is still improvement to be had in the devices that it monitors. It doesn't monitor some storage devices that we use, which is quite frustrating. It wasn't able to monitor Dell EMC Compellent Storage."

What is our primary use case?

I work for a managed service provider. We use LogicMonitor to monitor our customers' environments. There are probably about 30 customers who have their environments monitored by LogicMonitor. This allows us to get good visibility over different environments. If there are any issues, then it creates alerts. It also syncs in with our ticketing system, so it will create a ticket which is then assigned to an engineer to look at the issue.

Customers can log into LogicMonitor and see their own environment, and we can login to see all our customers' environments.

How has it helped my organization?

It allows us, as a company, to be proactive rather than reactive. We can go and sort issues as they are occurring. This is rather than waiting for things to become a big issue then having to sort them out, e.g., disk space on servers. A customer might have a server with disk space that is getting a bit low. With LogicMonitor, we can see that happening in advance, then we can get in touch with the customer and make some changes to avoid that being a problem. Whereas, in the past, it would have been a case of getting a call when the disk drive was full, then server is out, and there is loss of downtime and service. Therefore, we're avoiding those issues by fixing the problems before they happen.  

The solution’s ability to customize data sources has been helpful for our organization.

What is most valuable?

We can set dashboards up on screens around the office so we can see what's going on. The dashboards are all customizable. We use the custom dashboards the most. We have a main screen which shows all of our customers and alerts. We have another screen that shows performance metrics, like disk, processor usage, etc. We also have dashboards that the customers themselves can log into and look at, so they can log in and have a look at their own environment.

The integration in with our ticketing system (ConnectWise) is also valuable.

The solution has reduced our number of false positives compared to how many we were getting with other monitoring platforms. The fine tuning in LogicMonitor is one of the best features. Sometimes you install monitoring systems and they have a lot of chatter. You plug them in and suddenly your inbox is full with irrelevant information, whereas LogicMonitor is better at this out-of-the-box.

LogicMonitor provides us with granular alert-tuning for devices, which is helpful. Being able to fine tune alerts allows us to be more efficient with how we use the software. It allows us to get less false positives. We can obtain the information that we need rather than having to sort through alerts and information coming through, which are irrelevant, as this can have us end up ignoring stuff similar to the little boy who cried, "Wolf!" 

The solution’s ability to alert us if the cloud loses contact with on-prem collectors works well. It's definitely an advantage when it can monitor that the collector's gone down, then it won't send you a million alerts saying, "Everything on the site's down," because it's intelligent enough to know what's happening. Whereas, in some solutions, it will just say if the Internet connection to the site has gone down, then all of your devices on that site have been lost. In LogicMonitor, it will say the collector has gone down, then we can see what's going on there. So, it mutes the other alerts.

What needs improvement?

The reporting is okay. We don't use it that heavily. It is probably one of the less developed parts of the platform. We don't use it very much, but it could do with some improvements.

They have been toying around with new graphical designs recently. Most people are probably happy with the way it looks at the moment (the original design is quite nice), whereas the new graphic design stuff has been a bit bright and colorful. 

It monitors most devices out-of-the-box, but not all. There is still improvement to be had in the devices that it monitors. It doesn't monitor some storage devices that we use, which is quite frustrating. It wasn't able to monitor Dell EMC Compellent Storage. In terms of what it can monitor though, the list would be enormous. E.g., it has very good VMware support.

For how long have I used the solution?

About three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is pretty good. I'm not aware of any problems that we've had with it. We certainly haven't had any downtime.

It's very low on maintenance. You do need to update things periodically. One person is needed for day-to-day maintenance.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is very good. I know that it's working in companies with many thousands of devices. Therefore, it is way bigger than we need at the moment. 

In my company, there are about eight people who probably use it from pre-sales and engineering, some more than others though. There are probably four or five who use it every day, then three or four people who sort of use it periodically. We also have about 30 customers using it for viewing purposes.

It is being used extensively across our customers as a managed service. We are growing it all the time. We're always pushing it, especially in the current crisis being able to remotely monitor your systems is even more important. There is a big push on it at the moment to get more customers signed up.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support is very good. They have a chat system built into the website. It's always very quick to get a hold of someone. They've always sorted out any problems we've had.

The last issue they resolved was awhile ago. It had something to do with setting up the configuration between LogicMonitor and our ticket system. From what I remember, I had just a few queries and they sorted it out, then everything worked. So, that's good.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were previously using two or three monitoring tools. SolarWinds might have been one of the other tools. Now, we only use one monitoring solution.

I have used SolarWinds, PRTG, and SCOM. The benefits of LogicMonitor are it's easier to set up, the alert fine tuning is better out-of-the-box, and it has more features and functionality.

How was the initial setup?

I wasn't there for the main install, but I have done a lot of subsequent installs. It is very simple, straightforward, and easy to set up. The documentation is good.

The solution’s automated, agentless discovery, deployment, and configuration works as you would expect. I give my experience with it positive reviews.

To get it up and running for a basic setup, it takes probably a day. In addition, there is the the job of adding in all the devices, fine tuning the alerts, etc.

What about the implementation team?

One or two people are need for implementation. 

When we have a new customer come onboard, we have a process that we follow to get them setup. It's really just a case of discussing with a customer what they need monitored, then going through and collecting the details we need to add devices. After that, we add the devices in, creating for that customer their own dashboards, groups and section of the monitoring platform. We then just monitor it over the next few months to fine tune things.

What was our ROI?

We have absolutely seen ROI. We sell managed service contracts and the solution is part of that contract. Without it, we would have a tougher time trying to manage calls. We might need to have even more engineers. So, it definitely helps us to save money and provide better service. Even aside from saving manpower and time, it helps our organization's credibility and to increase sales.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I am pretty sure that it is a one-off licensing fee with no hidden costs.

What other advice do I have?

Biggest lesson learnt: How to be more efficient and more proactive rather than reactive.

We haven't used it for automation purposes, but we may potentially look into that in the future.

I would rate the solution as an eight (out of 10).

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Reseller.
Douglas Hoover
IT Systems Engineer at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 10
We can more finely tune the details of our monitoring

Pros and Cons

  • "The alerting would be number one in my book. The thresholds for getting alerts for different criteria are pretty well-thought-out. We don't get many false positives or negatives on the alerting side. If we do get an email alert or some similar alert, we know that it is something that has to be looked at."
  • "Some more application performance type monitoring would be nice. For example, an APM type solution, which would not necessarily completely replace it, but be able to tie into to what we're seeing on the application performance side so we can correlate what's going on with the application versus the underlying infrastructure."

What is our primary use case?

The biggest things are infrastructure monitoring and alerting. This is mostly for our virtual machines, but it is also for other networking equipment and a few other pieces as well.

We are at the newest update. It is a mix between on-premise Collectors and their software as a service (SaaS), which is the newest update. Our Collectors are also on the newest version right now. While they don't have to be the newest version, they tend to get pretty close to the newest version to work properly.

How has it helped my organization?

We have used the solution’s ability to customize data sources to a small degree. We are able to more finely tune all the details of what we are monitoring. This comes down to the false negatives or positives, and being able to alert on the actual details that we want to be alerted on.

What is most valuable?

The alerting would be number one in my book. The thresholds for getting alerts for different criteria are pretty well-thought-out. We don't get many false positives or negatives on the alerting side. If we do get an email alert or some similar alert, we know that it is something that has to be looked at.

I built a remote workforce dashboard, which is my favorite dashboard. When the company pretty much all started working from home, I put together a lot of different graphs of types of infrastructure pieces necessary for users to be able to work from home and put those all onto one dashboard. Therefore, at a glance, we could view the health to make sure anybody working remotely would be in good shape and be able to work successfully.

The reporting capabilities are pretty effective, if you know what you are looking for. We don't use the reporting features a whole lot. However, when I have gone in to create reports, as long as you know what you want to be included in the report, it's definitely pretty quick and easy to get the reporting started.

What needs improvement?

Some more application performance type monitoring would be nice. For example, an APM type solution, which would not necessarily completely replace it, but be able to tie into to what we're seeing on the application performance side so we can correlate what's going on with the application versus the underlying infrastructure.

For how long have I used the solution?

Our company has been using it for four to five years. I personally have been using it within the company for about three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's been highly stable. We have had two brief outages, which lasted less than an hour, in the three years that I have worked with them.

We have two people (at any time) dedicated to deployment and maintenance. They are our systems engineers.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is easily scalable.

We have about 20 users working with the solution who are mostly systems engineers. We also have some DevOps engineers and a few software architects who use it.

We have 1000 resources that we are monitoring with a couple hundred websites. As our company grows, we do plan to increase usage, but nothing major. It will probably be about a 10 percent increase over the next year or two.

How are customer service and technical support?

I'd rate the technical support pretty highly. The few times that we have had to put in a ticket for support, they have been very helpful. Every time that I can remember, the issue has always been something on the actual resource being monitored. While not technically LogicMonitor's fault, they were still able to help us quickly identify and resolve it.

Twice in the last three years, we have had brief outages between LogicMonitor and our solution. We received phone calls almost immediately from LogicMonitor indicating this. It was a very quick reaction. We know the issue isn't on our side, which is good, in these particular cases.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

LogicMonitor was able to replace at least two different solutions that we had in the past for monitoring. One of them being Logicworks. LogicMonitor was able to monitor a wide variety of websites, devices, and virtual machines. We were able to consolidate some of our monitoring so we are one single source now instead of multiple.

How was the initial setup?

The solution’s automated and agentless discovery, deployment, and configuration has been helpful. I've used some of the automated discovery, especially when we've changed data centers and put a bunch of new hosts into our data center. I used their discovery tool. It was able to find and pull in most of the resources that we actually wanted. Even though I wasn't there for the initial deployment, for the times that I have used it, it seems very helpful. There are still some manual processes and checking that we do, but it has helped out a lot.

Out-of-the-box, it was able to monitor vSphere virtual machines, which was the biggest for us. We also have network load balancers, switches, and firewalls that it was able to pull in. We had to do very little to get it monitoring and reporting correctly.

What was our ROI?

We have definitely seen ROI with LogicMonitor. We used to provide 24/7 IT support for our users. We have since been able to change to operating just within normal business hours for IT support, and LogicMonitor was a large part of being able to accomplish that.

LogicMonitor has reduced our number of false positives compared to how many we were getting with other monitoring platforms. We have seen a 50 percent reduction in false positives, possibly more.

What other advice do I have?

It really just comes down to making sure that we're getting alerts on something that actually does need attention.

We're starting to look into the solution’s Artificial Intelligence for IT Operations (AIOps) capabilities for things like anomaly detection, root cause analysis, or dynamic thresholds to see if it might be useful for some of our services.

Take a look at your environment and at what level of detail you will need for monitoring. One of the advantages to LogicMonitor is just monitoring your vSphere environment without monitoring the individual VMs within it. You still get a lot of detail about those VMs as instances. To put a VM in as a resource, instead of an instance, you get a lot more granularity on the operating system side for what you can look at. However, just monitoring your vSphere environment alone gives you a surprising amount of detail.

The biggest lesson I've learned is you need to understand what role your different devices play in your infrastructure in order to successfully monitor them. Get a detailed list of the devices that you do have in your environment that you want monitored and why you want them monitored. The why you want them monitored will tell you what different things you might want to be alerted on because LogicMonitor will collect a lot of information about your devices. Narrowing down what you actually want to be alerted on is the important part.

I would rate the solution as a nine out of 10.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
NimerBsoul
DevOps at a tech vendor with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 20
Easy to configure with a good UI that is easy to navigate, but the graphs need to be more intuitive

Pros and Cons

  • "The most valuable feature is the UI because I find it very easy to navigate and you see everything with graphs."
  • "The graphs are not intuitive and I think that they can be improved to help find issues faster."

How has it helped my organization?

If we have an issue, whether it is the CPU, memory, or other resources, then I can check to see what it is using LogicMontor. With two clicks, I know which device and the details.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the UI because I find it very easy to navigate and you see everything with graphs.

LogicMonitor is very easy to configure.

What needs improvement?

The graphs are not intuitive and I think that they can be improved to help find issues faster. As it is now, I need to dig in more and try to filter things. Graphs are meant to be read easily, but in this case, they're not. There are different styles for CPUs, such as spiking with lines, and personally, I don't like that. I like more dots because with the display now, you never know what the limit is. When it is past the limit, that is where you need to check. Really, I'm not sure if any monitoring tools do that.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using LogicMonitor for the past three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We use the cloud-managed service and we've never had an issue with stability. It's always up. We have configured an SSO to login with it.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scaling this solution is not part of my job, but I have never heard that it was an issue to scale it. We have another team that takes care of this.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We recently used Grafana, which is an open-source solution. It's pretty good and I like it. I didn't use it much, but we are moving our infrastructure to Kubernetes and Grafana works well with that.

What other advice do I have?

From what I have used in this solution, it is one that I recommend. I'm not sure how to configure it at the backend, but for my use it is good.

I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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