LogRhythm NextGen SIEM Pros and Cons

LogRhythm NextGen SIEM Pros

Jim Mohr
Principal Security Analyst at a healthcare company with 501-1,000 employees
We take in around 750 million logs a day. We have a lot of products and that would be a lot of different panes of glass that we would have to look through otherwise. By centralizing, we can triage and take steps much more quickly than if we tried to man that many interfaces that come with the products.
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Avraham Sonenthal
Senior Network Engineer at a government with 5,001-10,000 employees
The feature that makes it usable is the web interface.
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Jacob Hinkle
Security Engineer at Managed Technology Services LLC
We have to be able to show the evidence, and LogRhythm does a great job of putting it forward and making it easy to create reports with nice looking dashboards, which show off what we are doing as a security program.
Their customer support is friendly and willing to help.
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SnrArchi4b5a
Senior Architect at a energy/utilities company with 201-500 employees
We have NetFlow information going into it, so we can examine a lot of traffic patterns and anomalies, especially if something stands out and is not the baseline. This helps a lot.
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Wadson Fleurigene
Information Security Engineer at Seminole Tribe of Florida
It has allowed us to dive deeper into our network and figure out what is going on by parsing logs properly and being able to reduce the time it takes to work cases down from seven days to approximately two days.
LogRhythm has increased productivity because all the tools that we need are in the web UI, allowing us to find threats on our network fast and efficiently.
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Alex Wood
Systems CSO at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
The alarm functions have helped us cut down on the manual work. They bubble things up to us instead of our having to go look for stuff. Also, from an operational perspective, day to day, the Case Management functions are really useful for us. They allow us to track what we see in the incidents that we have.
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Anthony Workman
Enterprise Information Technology Security Engineer at a government with 1,001-5,000 employees
The most valuable features would be the automation, reporting, and the support.
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Rob Haller
Security Engineer at US Acute Care Solutions
Its benefits are broad. The solution isn't necessarily made to do any one thing, but it can do anything you tell it to. It is able to tackle any different type or size of job.
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Kurt Schroeder
Senior Security Engineer at a manufacturing company with 5,001-10,000 employees
The AI Engine can take an event and correlate it into something else giving us meaningful context regarding what is going on. We integrated it in with our ticketing system, so if an alarm fires, it raises a ticket in our system.
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Briane Harris
SOC Analyst at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Even other products we have that feed into it, instead of having to watch all of them we only have to watch one. For example, we have CrowdStrike, so instead of having to pay attention that solution - because their dashboard doesn't really pop when an alarm comes up - we can see issues with the red on the LogRhythm alarm. That is very nice.
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LogRhythm NextGen SIEM Cons

Joe Benjamin
SIEM Architect at Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc.
My biggest issue - I know that they say they're doing it - is that the API-building is extremely important. They keep saying it's coming, it's coming. It's not coming fast enough. I don't care if they need to double their team size to get it out there quicker, the world is already in the cloud and we can't monitor it. That's a big problem for us. My boss keeps coming to me about it. That's an issue.
My biggest complaint is documentation. Everyone tells me, "We have documentation on the Community site." I have searched for different types of documentation on numerous occasions, and it might be there, but it's not easily findable.
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Jim Mohr
Principal Security Analyst at a healthcare company with 501-1,000 employees
I have Windows administrators who will remove the agent when they think that that's what's fouling up their upgrade or their install or their reconfiguration, etc. The first thing they do is to turn off the antivirus, turn down the firewall, and take off anything else. They don't realize that the LogRhythm agent is just sitting there monitoring. Most antivirus products have application protection features built-in where, if I'm an admin on a box, I can't uninstall antivirus. I need to have to the antivirus admin password to do that.
We do about 750 million a day and some days we do 715 million. Some days we do 820 million or 1.2 billion. But there's no way to drill in and find out: "Where did I get 400,000 extra logs today?" What was going on in my environment that I was able to absorb that peak? I have no way to identify it without running reports, which will produce a long-running PDF that I have to somehow compare to another long-running PDF... I would like to see like profiling behavior awareness around systems like they've been gunned to do around users with UEBA.
We had a little bit of difficulty implementing a disaster recovery situation because it was leveraging only Microsoft native DNS and it wouldn't work with our Infoblox DNS deployment that we use in our environment. They've been working on that behind the scenes.
Sometimes the error-logging is not altogether helpful. For example, on an upgrade, a systems data processor, a Windows box, was throwing an error code like 1083. Then it just stopped and it died right out of the installer and nobody looked. We searched through Google and what it means is the Windows Firewall wasn't turned on so that it could create a rule for the product. Why wouldn't they bubble up that description so that I wouldn't have to call support and I could just know, "Okay, the firewall wasn't turned on. Turn it back on. Re-run the installer and keep going."
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Avraham Sonenthal
Senior Network Engineer at a government with 5,001-10,000 employees
It is a product that is very hard to use.
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Jacob Hinkle
Security Engineer at Managed Technology Services LLC
The installation was a bit complex because we are running a virtual infrastructure.
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SnrArchi4b5a
Senior Architect at a energy/utilities company with 201-500 employees
We're still struggling to get a real return on it and finding something that isn't false noise.
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Wadson Fleurigene
Information Security Engineer at Seminole Tribe of Florida
Technical support could use a little work in the terms of responding back. The feedback that we received is they do need a little more staff.
We would like to see more things out of the console into the web UI. I guess this is what they are doing in 7.4.
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Alex Wood
Systems CSO at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
We have run into problems with stability going through upgrade processes. Recently, we have been on the front edge of the upgrade path. When that happens we tend to run into issues either with certain functionality not working after the upgrades or stability issues because of the upgrades.
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Anthony Workman
Enterprise Information Technology Security Engineer at a government with 1,001-5,000 employees
My big thing is the easability. I don't like to go to two different systems. The fat client that you have to install to configure it, then the web console which is just for reporting and analysis. These features need to collapse, and it needs to be in a single solution. Going through the web solution in the future is the way to do it, because right now, it is a bit cumbersome.
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Rob Haller
Security Engineer at US Acute Care Solutions
I would like to see APIs well-documented and public facing, so we can get to them all.
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Kurt Schroeder
Senior Security Engineer at a manufacturing company with 5,001-10,000 employees
I would like a more fuller implementation of STIX/TAXII so I can pull in some of the government lists without having to go implement a whole new STIX/TAXII platform.
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Find out what your peers are saying about LogRhythm, Splunk, IBM and others in Security Information and Event Management (SIEM). Updated: March 2020.
407,242 professionals have used our research since 2012.