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Micro Focus Service Virtualization OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Micro Focus Service Virtualization is the #4 ranked solution in our list of top Service Virtualization tools. It is most often compared to Broadcom Service Virtualization: Micro Focus Service Virtualization vs Broadcom Service Virtualization

What is Micro Focus Service Virtualization?

Micro Focus Service Virtualization helps to simulate a services behavior in a production environment. This simulation software enables in-house development and testing teams to keep to their schedules regardless of access to production systems.

Micro Focus Service Virtualization is also known as HPE Service Virtualization.

Buyer's Guide

Download the Service Virtualization Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: October 2021

Micro Focus Service Virtualization Customers

Virgin Media, TTNet

Micro Focus Service Virtualization Video

Archived Micro Focus Service Virtualization Reviews (more than two years old)

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it_user739536
Principal consultant at a tech vendor with 51-200 employees
Vendor
Valuable features are support for integration patterns and ease of use to the wizard-based utility. Needs more support for different protocols.

Pros and Cons

  • "The support for integration patterns and the ease of use to wizard-based utility is what I would consider the most important features for service virtualization platforms."
  • "More support for different protocols. I would love to see more wizards rather than relying on some custom coding, which you can use C# as well as Visual Basic scripting. In the service virtualization platform, I would love to see more wizard features as well as the ability to connect to an external database, which by the way, we have put an enhancement request in for. I'd love to see that in the service virtualization platform."

What is most valuable?

The whole service virtualization concept works on integration patterns, so the service virtualization should be supporting the regular RESTful services. However, it should also support services that listen and reply to MQs, generic JMS, SAP WebMethods integration server, universal messaging, or SAP virtualization database (or whatever virtualization you have, e.g., Java virtualization).

The support for these integration patterns and the ease of use to wizard-based utility is what I would consider the most important features for service virtualization platforms.

How has it helped my organization?

It has improve our organization a lot. For example, one of our very recent client's implementations that our Patson USA team did, we saved more than $15 million. This is in confirmed savings. In the past three and a half years of our implementation there, it helps you avoid the environment, get your software to production a lot faster, and reduces the wait times. That means it improves the productivity of your pre-production community. It also helps you in finding defects earlier if you can shift your testing left and integrate your application under test with virtual services.

What needs improvement?

With service virtualization, I'd love to see support for the Internet of things. I would love to see a web portal that the developers can use without consuming the virtual service designer license. This portal would be a lightweight utility where developers can put their own request response parameters for an already-created virtual service. This would really help in the DevOps culture.

More support for different protocols. I would love to see more wizards rather than relying on some custom coding, which you can use C# as well as Visual Basic scripting. In the service virtualization platform, I would love to see more wizard features as well as the ability to connect to an external database, which by the way, we have put an enhancement request in for. I'd love to see that in the service virtualization platform.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The service virtualization tool is perhaps one of the newest tools compared to its competitors, but it also means it has a very high degree of energy in it. From our experience, we have put more than 20 enhancement requests for the service virtualization platform and to the Micro Focus R&D team, based in Prague in the Czech Republic, who has been very approachable. They have taken our suggestions and they have actually implemented our enhancement requests, which is very nice to know.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The tool by itself is scalable. It does not have load-balancing capabilities, but the competitors don't either. I don't know if you really need to have that kind of capability, although that is one of the enhancement requests that we have been talking to Micro Focus about, and we'll continue to go down that path.

The tool is scalable. For example, we have about 60 or so services deployed to one single license of Micro Focus at any given time, of Micro Focus service virtualization. I would rate the stability and the scalability high up there.

How is customer service and technical support?

Most of our tickets go to Micro Focus R&D. On the support side, I would say because service virtualization is newer compared to LoadRunner, most of our tickets get routed to R&D, as opposed to the LoadRunner, where most of the tickets get resolved at the first layer of support.

How was the initial setup?

I was involved in the initial setup, and not just the software set up, but I was also involved in getting the right hardware configuration for that kind of workload. Our Patson USA team worked closely with HPE R&D (now Micro Focus R&D) to even figure out the CPU processor speed that would be needed to support 3,000 transactions per second, and HPE helped us out with that.

The initial setup was very straightforward. It is complex, but it is straightforward if you know what you're doing. There are various different ways you can set up the tool and that's where the complexity is. But, if you just want to do the traditional setup, it's very easy to do.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I was heavily involved with our Patson USA team when they were tasked with choosing the right platform for our clients and we evaluated all the competitors. We evaluated Cecilia, Parasoft, as well as IBM Green Hat, the Micro Focus service virtualization tool, and an open source, at that time, SmartBear also had service virtualization capability (I believe they do now, as well). We evaluated all of that. We put about 1500 criteria of what are we looking for in a service virtualization platform. We consulted with entire enterprise architecture teams. Many different teams collaborated with them and came up with that 1500 criteria, and this is how we were heavily involved in that decision-making.

What other advice do I have?

In terms of its support and the technical abilities that it has, there are other tools. I'm not gonna name them, they have a higher degree of technical ability. Unfortunately, their support and their performance are not that great. You want to have a car. You don't want to have a Ferrari that doesn't work. You need to have a car that can get you from point A to point B, and HP service virtualization has been performed there.

Don't give up. It may sound very expensive at the beginning, but we have realized more than $15 million in savings at one of our major healthcare clients. It will really help you. Try working with your management to have them spend the money on getting a service virtualization platform.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user470511
Sr. Manager- Technology Office at Technology Leader & Evangelist
Real User
The most valuable feature is that it reduces the dependency. The awareness of service virtualization needs to be improved.

Pros and Cons

  • "The most valuable feature is that it reduces the dependency so that the down time of the environment is not a major cost. That cost can be used for something else like the cloud."
  • "HPE products are good, but they never make a product for a specific use. They make a product for the enterprise because that is their vision. They like multi-generational business plans. That means that they don't deliver small bits and pieces, but rather, they deliver to the enterprise."

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is that it reduces the dependency so that the down time of the environment is not a major cost. That cost can be used for something else like the cloud.

The important is thing is that Service Virtualization allows you, each and every individual, and each and every system, to be up at any time throughout the cycle.

That indirect cost impact is in the millions of dollars for any IT organization. The direct cause may be that the environment is down and that the tester is sitting for ten hours.

However, the indirect cost is that the end product is not achieving its release date. That is the business impact. If you look at the broader picture, the silos may be the Service Virtualization, but the end-to-end picture is that there is a huge impact, and that impact is actually priceless.

I cannot go and say that, "Okay, tomorrow I'm a mobile service. My apps are not going on mobile." So, I cannot calculate it, and I cannot write that particular dollar value, because I never know what it is.

For example, a sales platform may have the features that I have added, to give me a million dollar sale, or it may not. However, Service Virtualization allows you to release on time at least, so you can align with the strategy of your business.

It gives you granularity and transformation. My personal point of view is that Service Virtualization plays a major role in transforming your development, testing, and operating engineer into a business engineer.

The industry is moving towards Agile and DevOps. The most important thing is that each and every individual in your company is not thinking of themselves as individuals, but rather as if they are the end consumer, or running the business themselves.

Certain products have their own monopoly and they really don't want to share their market share. Service Virtualization enables you to share everything in terms of the protocol tier.

With a CRM system, you have all other systems integrated. You can virtualize and then the core system is CRM. And if you never virtualize, your own virtualization falls down. This is how it works.

How has it helped my organization?

I can use functional performer automation everywhere. However, the questions still remain of when and how I need to use it.

If I run a load test and I need a Service Virtualization, I can use the same asset. But when I'm using the same asset against the functional test, do I need to use it as is, or do I need to modify the workflow?

They must have that pace, but the product itself is up and coming as a new product in the market. Companies themselves are struggling to find out how they can align the technology with testing and developing practices, or where they can fit it into functional automation of performers or integration.

At the same time, there are a lot of emerging technologies coming onto the market. These other companies are saying that Service Virtualization leads to the first step, and then they realize that protocol leads to the fifth step.

The problem is that there is too much around. I hope that the company who manufactures a product will be more focused on how they can reduce this timeline distance by utilizing Service Virtualization.

If I have an in-house application in place, it allows me to pull information. If I can create an in-house environment manager, then I can go and buy some of the off-the-shelf products from the industry, and then I can do it.

This allows me to have that control of each Service Virtualization asset. It also tells me if somebody has done some sort of ideological testing, or ideological test flow. It will let me know how I can adopt that work flow and add my ideas. Alternatively, I can really go on his idea and tell the developer that the idea sounds great, but it should have been done another way.

What needs improvement?

The awareness of Service Virtualization needs to be improved. People still have doubts about having a virtual asset over a physical environment. They want to know if they are going to behave differently, or in a similar way.

They want to know if they are running everything through Service Virtualization if there will be some sort of compliance issue.

I see that it is the simulation of an actual environment, and that the compliance issue can be addressed. Most products are not provided with detailed information, and that creates a lot of hesitation in the market about whether they should adopt it or not.

If it is adopted, they need to know whether or not they're going to get a similar result to what they see in a physical environment.

They need to know if they have to educate their staff and if are they able to be educated prior to implementation for the amount of CapEx invested.

HPE products are good, but they never make a product for a specific use. They make a product for the enterprise because that is their vision. They like multi-generational business plans. That means that they don't deliver small bits and pieces, but rather, they deliver to the enterprise.

When you talk about a complex domain like Service Virtualization, and when you talk about delivering such a wide landscape product, it has to go through lot of improvement cycles.

They are doing it. They are putting forth hard effort. They are putting in dollars, manpower, and they are hiring good techs. We respect that and hopefully they will arrive to the point where they will be able to compete in the market and become one of the dominant leaders, or THE dominant leader for Service Virtualization.

When you have business potential, why not spend money on R&D? Anybody will spend, and rather than being led by their CEO, R&D is being led by their customers who are thinking in the same direction.

The protocol maturity, the technology maturity, is about to come. The Service Virtualization is the first case, and it is not marketed well by any of the vendors. It should have a very strategic view. That is also missing.

The most important thing is that more and more customers need to be involved in lunch and learn sessions where get they can get feedback so the program is not run by product companies.

If you really go to the networking, infra, and other ADM spaces, you have a bunch of them running it, but not in this particular space.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Service Virtualization is not stable in the market right now, if you really check the technology behind it.

We majored a system in an OSI reference model, so we skipped most layers as well as apps and session tiers where traffic is recorded.

I have a web server, an application server, a file server, and a database server that takes a normal user work floor. If a user comes, they log in, and the traffic flows in. Service Virtualization allows you to record it, and simulate the way it's supposed to be simulated in a real environment.

I would like to define the stability of a critical system, for example, with the mainframe. We are still struggling with how to create APIs in Service Virtualization to talk with our AS/400 system and with a couple of CRM systems that are so proprietary that you cannot even record a set out of them.

Protocols are constantly changing. If you asked me ten years ago how many protocols I was using, I could give a number.

However, today, it's not X, it's X plus Y, plus Z. This keeps growing, and the product, and the companies who are making the Service Virtualization product are unable to keep up that pace.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

In terms of scalability, I have designed one of the biggest Service Virtualization systems where I'm running a bunch of assets.

In my opinion, I have seen the scalability and I know that it goes from the network to the apps.

In terms of technology, the scalability is good and robust. It varies from industry to industry, and it is dependent on your business model and your technology landscape. There are a lot of “ifs and buts”.

How are customer service and technical support?

I did use technical support. My personal view is that HPE is maturing in the Service Virtualization domain. They have a long way to go.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were not using a different solution. One of my customers wanted to make sure that they heard about it, and they wanted to go in that direction.

Then I went to the market, performed a lot of Google research, and then I called a vendor. They came in and did a lot of presentations to help the customer to understand what they have. Then, we had our own matrix in place while the vendor selection took place and we decided which product to take.

We contacted the top three vendors again and asked their solutions architect to design a prototype in our environment. We identified tone prototype that had a good thing, but two had nothing. At the end of the day, nobody was perfect, but HPE was the best.

How was the initial setup?

I'm not normally involved in the setup. We usually have a process in place, where we follow the enterprise architect cycle.

It is not like I just go and get the product. I have to make sure that the product is stable. I have to ask if it has the ability to design a prototype and whether or not it fits.

I was involved in that. I ran a cycle and I identified a product. It took a long time to explain to people how to create assets and build up the communication collaboration.

We had to go through an eight to twelve month cycle to make them understand how to set up the actual tools and learn where they needed to use them.

It was probably a two year plan, or roadmap, to educate our staff, but we succeeded. It is one of the most successful projects that give us millions of dollars in ROI. There was a lot of integration, so it was great fun to work on, to learn, and it is a very good teaching tool as well.

It's a complex system and eventually it becomes straightforward. It's simple for an individual to use, but complex when you have the entire organization adopting it.

What was our ROI?

You should stay and stick with it for a minimum of eighteen months to two years. You will then see a lot of ROI out of it. The ROI may be less in terms of dollar value, but the long term ROI is very good.

I have done it personally. I drew up an end-to-end implementation and the whole process implementation along with the technology. I have a proven experience behind it.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I don't want to provide any names, but there are many other players in the market, from thirty-year old companies to newer two-year old ones. They all are doing well. They all provide benefits to their respective domains.

If you ask me, everybody is trying and definitely HPE is among the market leaders. They really perform good market research and have good expertise with a good amount of dollars invested.

I don't just go and purchase by name, by product, or by need. Here’s my process:

  1. I would go and explore a minimum of three different vendors.
  2. Bring them in-house, ask them to design a prototype, and perform a PoC.
  3. Study the vendor profile, how good they are with you in your journey, and where your IT is moving.
  4. Follow the end-to-end processes, because it gives you enterprise framework vision, of how your IT landscape is going to look.
  5. Then do the selection based on your financial technology, maintenance, support, and your comfort, and see if your organization's needs are matching.

Use these five major criteria, I usually call them five finger criteria, and the one that ticks the most products is the product that you select.

What other advice do I have?

Service Virtualization is one of the great tool sets coming into the market. It's really going to change the industry.

In order to release my product on schedule, the development and testing time becomes one of the major challenges, although it is not only challenge.

Other challenges include dependency and time consumption. On the other hand, the industry is dealing with a big shift in transformation from legacy to brownfield, and from brownfield to greenfield. We have a separate greenfield layout going on.

When I have a tough integration, a very complex integration system, and when I'm going to roll out my product quickly, I'm looking at concepts like DevOps and Agile, where time to market is going to be much less.

I have to expedite my testing and development. To do that expedition, I have to make sure my pre-production staging integration environments are fully ready. If they are not ready, I'm unable to achieve my desired goal.

It plays a very vital role in this whole cycle, where you can really create a Service Virtualization asset. An asset may be your environment, a web service, or even a single call. We create that asset and we reduce the dependency.

As an example, if I want to virtualize my Telco system, I need payment and billing gateway services. I also need some sort of verification services from the third party vendor. So, rather than building an environment, I will create a Service Virtualization payment asset such as a Visa.

I then use this Visa environment for the billing system, so I can create an asset. I can recall that asset as many times as I want to in my different testing scenarios.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Find out what your peers are saying about Micro Focus, Broadcom, Parasoft and others in Service Virtualization. Updated: October 2021.
542,267 professionals have used our research since 2012.
it_user285366
Senior QA Manager at a retailer with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
It allows us to independently test without development delay for integration. Having an SQL-based implementation would be far more usable.

What is most valuable?

REST and SOAP virtualization; we are a very heavy service-oriented company and very reliant on third-party services. Having the ability to test independently without development delay for integration has been very critical for our ability to deliver.

How has it helped my organization?

Teams have reduced the amount of delayed development effort it takes to roll out a new product by leveraging a virtual service for development and then meeting up for a final integration test when it is complete. The tool has been highly useful for edge case and negative test case efforts by QA as well as useful for high-volume levels of performance testing against third-party endpoints.

What needs improvement?

The data-driven model is painful at best. The usage of Excel can be cumbersome for larger services being virtualized. Having an SQL-based implementation would be far more usable. Also, the requirement of an SQL Server database for each individual user of the Designer tool is overkill. A shared schema would be better.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have used it for two years.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

No deployment or stability issues, and the tool scales fantastically.

How is customer service and technical support?

I use a reseller for my support needs; it’s been fantastic when needed.

How was the initial setup?

Initial setup was extremely easy; just a typical Windows installation wizard and it took me no time to get this deployed.

What about the implementation team?

I implemented this tool myself. Go download it from the HPE website and try it out; it’s easy!

What was our ROI?

The Enterprise Server gives us what we need for performance testing. I think one Designer license is sufficient with the introduction of the Community Designer license now. Identifying ROI for this tool has been a challenge for us to prove out still.

What other advice do I have?

Seriously, download it and try it. If you can virtualize your services with the tool with limited effort, then it’ll be the right choice for you.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user567618
Service Manager at a financial services firm with 5,001-10,000 employees
Vendor
Easy to set up and use. Reduces hardware costs.

What is most valuable?

It is quite quit easy to set up and use.

How has it helped my organization?

The solution saved quite a bit of the cost of the hardware. The cost has really gone down.

What needs improvement?

So far it's okay. I would like them to reduce the cost of the licenses.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is good. I would say it's okay.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is quite good.

How are customer service and technical support?

We used technical support once in a while. The support is fantastic. Their response, expertise, and knowledge is quite good.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were using IBM virtualization and Microsoft. We looked at quite a number of solutions and we ended up with the HPE product. Before we chose HPE, we had to do a proof of concept, and we liked what we saw.

How was the initial setup?

I wasn’t involved in the setup, but I heard from my colleagues who said the first setup was a bit challenging. However, with support from the HPE team, it was good. We were able to sort out the issues that came up.

What other advice do I have?

What we looked for to select a solution was ease of use, scalability, cost, and professionalism in terms of the people who do the implementation.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user506871
Senior Associate Technology at a media company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Vendor
It can keep virtual services in a learn or a simulate mode. You can view the requests learned and change simulated data.

Valuable Features:

  • HPE Service Virtualization Designer
  • Virtual services learning and recording data: We can keep virtual services in learn mode, simulate mode, etc., which is very good and everything is automatic. One can view the requests learned and change simulated data.
  • HPE Service Virtualization portal: There’s a similar feature in portal where we can park services in different modes.
  • Deploy and undeploy with a single click is an awesome feature.

Improvements to My Organization:

Performance testing and infrastructure costs were reduced because of virtual services.

Dependency on other teams was reduced, where we are expecting live services from them and they are not available. We can create virtual services in a few minutes with a few clicks using mocked data. This is awesome.

Room for Improvement:

There were minor version compatibility issues between HPSV project files while importing to the workspace, but these have already been addressed in recent versions. And same with stability.

Use of Solution:

I used it for 1.3 years.

Stability Issues:

Sometimes it stops working after switching remote and local servers.

Initial Setup:

Initial setup was simple and straightforward.

Cost and Licensing Advice:

When you are living with a lot of web services, it's worth having this product.

Other Solutions Considered:

We moved recently from HPE Service Virtualization to Parasoft.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user507303
System Engineer at a tech services company with 501-1,000 employees
Consultant
It reduces risk and results in faster release cycles through earlier functional and load testing.

Valuable Features

  • Mock virtualization: I don't need to wait for the entire application to be developed before I can begin testing integrations and possibly new features. That makes my development more agile and safe, in addition to speeding up my functional and load tests.
  • Reduced risk and faster release cycles through earlier functional and load testing

Improvements to My Organization

  • It helps my developers share services and access them, and eliminates the need to create and maintain stubs
  • It reduces redundant work (doing the same work twice only for testing).
  • My developer team is more agile right now.

Room for Improvement

  • The developers area
  • Performance testers

Use of Solution

I have used it for more than five years.

Deployment Issues

I have not encountered any deployment, stability or scalability issues.

Customer Service and Technical Support

Technical support is 9/10. They provide great service.

Initial Setup

It's easy to install and easy to use.

Implementation Team

Implementation was a great experience.

ROI

Low TCO

Other Solutions Considered

I had a trial of CA SV, but HPE is more intuitive and easy to use.

Other Advice

HPE SV helped me and my ALM team minimize workforce, reduce costs, and transition from hardware to virtualization; my software is more secure preproduction. That's fundamental for any company.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
ITCS user
Senior Associate - SOA Test Automation and Service Virtualization Technical Manager at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Consultant
The data model and agents are easy to use and configure.

Valuable Features

The data model and agents are easy to use and configure. Also, the logging functionality is very good.

Improvements to My Organization

This product has provided us the capability to virtualize dependent systems, which has resulted in the following improvements to our organization:

  • More productivity
  • No dependency on third-party systems
  • Faster test execution cycles

Room for Improvement

HP should work on providing better scripting support and include more communication and transport protocols. HP doesn't support many standard communication and transport protocol like Swift, FIX, EDI, MICS etc. Also the scripting functionality is in beta testing and not completely released so it may break at any time.

Use of Solution

I have used it for one year.

Stability Issues

The latest version, 3.81, is pretty stable.

Scalability Issues

I have not encountered any scalability issues.

Customer Service and Technical Support

Technical support is Excellent! The R&D team is excellent.

Initial Setup

Initial setup was straightforward.

Pricing, Setup Cost and Licensing

Use the server version; it might cost less.

Other Solutions Considered

We evaluated ITKO LISA and IBM RIT, but considering our requirements and cost, we found HP SV much more suitable for us.

Other Advice

Check the protocols supported in the product.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user467298
Senior Consultant at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Consultant
It has valuable built-in features. I would like to see support for integration with TDM tools.

Valuable Features:

Some of the key differentiators of this tool –

  • Easy to use.
  • Built-in integration with HP tools like LoadRunner, ALM and UFT.
  • Built-in integration with revision control software.
  • Support for multiple technologies including SAP.
  • Support for network virtualization.
  • Ability to control virtual services from ALM, HP ServiceTest, LoadRunner, UFT.

Room for Improvement:

  1. HP SV tool currently doesn’t support integration with Test Data Management tools which are used to simulate large volume of realistic data using various techniques. By integrating virtualization with TDM, testing penetration will be more.
  2. HP SV currently supports response data to be stored only in Excel sheets but the support should be extended to store the response data in an external database so that maintenance will be much easier.

Some features which have been added in a later version are 

  • Support for integration with TDM tools for more test coverage and to mimic production like data setup.
  • Support for database connectivity for storing external data and using it in virtual service responses.
  • Support for creating custom agents that allow developers to virtualize custom protocols like FIX, Swift, Copybook.
  • Handling of multiple responses for messaging protocols like JMS, IBM MQ.

Scalability Issues:

We have yet to implement this tool on a large scale. So far, we have only worked on client demos.

Other Advice:

I’m rating it a 7 because it is not a fully evolved virtualization tool compared to other tools offering the same service.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user331632
IT Manager, EAD QE CoE Lifecycle Virtualization at a pharma/biotech company with 10,001+ employees
Vendor
It is scalable, and supports a wide variety of message formats and transports.

Valuable Features

It is a scalable solution, capable of handling ~3,000 TPS. It supports a wide variety of message formats and transports.

Improvements to My Organization

  • Shift-Left by enabling Build and QA teams to conduct Development Integration/ API / Performance / System Integration Testing
  • Remove wait times for constrained services and speed delivery
  • Reduce infrastructure costs
  • Eliminate expenses from dev/test access to third-party services
  • Reduce downtime risk

Room for Improvement

As a design partner, our company has been working closely with HPE SV R&D and identified a number of improvements and enhancement recommendations that have been incorporated into HP SV releases.

Use of Solution

I have used this solution for three years.

Stability Issues

We have not encountered stability issues with the newer versions.

Scalability Issues

I have not encountered any issues with scalability.

Customer Service and Technical Support

Overall, technical support is good, but sometimes due to the complexity of the request, the support gets delayed and transferred to R&D late in the process.

Initial Setup

Initial setup was straightforward. It was easy to implement.

Other Solutions Considered

We evaluated CA LISA, Parasoft, and IBM GreenHat before choosing this product.

Other Advice

Work together with the Dev and Test teams. Understand what your needs are before you virtualize everything. There’s no benefit to virtualize everything: Analyze, design the solutions, and then start virtualizing.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user101727
Program Manager - Performance Engineering at a media company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
It cuts down dependency across dev as well as any third party components. They need to mature and move forward.

What is most valuable?

Service Virtualization cuts down dependency across dev as well as any third party components. We have saved a lot of round-trip time going back and forth trying to look for environments, trying to look for APIs that might have not even been built, so we already understand what the requirement is trying to build our own simulate and API and try to integrate them.

What needs improvement?

A lot of technology, a lot of Microsoft services, a lot of support to the functionality aspect of it - they need to mature a lot.

They need to catch-up, as for about four years they did not invest a lot of money on newer toolsets, adapting newer technologies, etc. There have been a bunch of companies that evolved during that time, like CA products and the Parasoft suite of products. These guys have already matured, so now HP is trying to play catch-up. They need to mature and move forward. The technology is always evolving, so they need to move towards that.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's scalable.

How are customer service and technical support?

I've not had to contact tech support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Service Virtualization, again it's a brand new concept, but we already had Parasoft. Now we are trying to gauge the synergy between the product lines which is good.

How was the initial setup?

It's pretty straightforward as long as you know how the tool is designed to work and the architecture behind how you need to implement it for your environment.

What other advice do I have?

They are playing a catch-up game.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user469167
Solution Architect at a tech company with 501-1,000 employees
Vendor
Customers can create their own virtualized web services and not need to go to that outside vendor. The UI needs to be a little more flexible from the customer standpoint.

Valuable Features

Service Virtualization is key. If a customer of ours is using applications that uses web services, we don't want to have them shell out a lot of extra money for pay-as-you go web services, or try to struggle with web services that aren't always available. That's where Service Virtualization comes in. They can create their own virtualized web services and not need to go to that outside vendor.

Room for Improvement

I think the biggest issues that I've seen, and this is a personal view of mine, is that most of the HPE products have a common look and feel to them. I'd really like to see it be a little more customizable to a use and user standpoint. For example. I happen to be colors blind, so I'd like to see more vivid colors on the UI, and things like that. It would make it a little more flexible from the customer standpoint.

Use of Solution

I was formally an HP employee, so I've used the HP products in the past. I also was a former Mercury Interactive employee who was acquired by HP.

Scalability Issues

It's been extremely scalable as far as the testing that we've done with our customers. They've all been really satisfied with the scalability of the HPE products.

Customer Service and Technical Support

I haven't used Service Virtualization in the last two or three months but prior to that I was involved with R&D as well, and they were extremely helpful.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We're partners.
it_user472194
Information Technology Manager - Infrastructure at a mining and metals company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
It's a more cost efficient approach to server deployment.

What is most valuable?

It's a much more cost efficient approach to server deployment. Not as much hardware is being used now.

What needs improvement?

Our next project is to move to the Cloud where a lot of the services will have to be re-learned with more innovation. It's got to be more scalable, but we won't be scaling it ourselves. It'll be more user defined. There won't be as many silos as there are now. It looks like some of the stuff being introduced at the show [Discover 16] will help us augment that, I'm waiting to learn more.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's very stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's very scalable.

How are customer service and technical support?

I've never had to contact them.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We actually use VMware on an HP Blade platform. We looked at other hardware platforms, but we chose HP because of the way that they gave us the best price. Their customer support seems to be really well responsive when we call.

How was the initial setup?

There was a learning curve, but that was several years ago, almost eight or nine years ago when we set initially. It was a learning curve for my infrastructure team. They were used to doing physical hardware deployments on an app server instead of virtualization of the server. Once they got behind them and the technology started running, we have virtualized 99% of all our data centers worldwide.

What other advice do I have?

I believe in the products that we're using. Don't look at it from an application standpoint. Don't let your users try to run with it. You set it up, you give them the guidelines and then let them run with it.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user468321
Chief Technology Officer (CTO) at a tech company with 501-1,000 employees
Vendor
Being able to look at my entire infrastructure from a hardware standpoint is valuable.

Valuable Features

  • Being able to look at my entire infrastructure from a hardware standpoint, load on top of it, and virtualize the entire infrastructure.
  • Manage it with a single pane of glass.

Improvements to My Organization

The concept's almost identical on that topic with respect to the old methodologies or legacy practices. You go in and actually install bare metal machines, put a virtualization engine on top of it, and try to do a P2V move. Where today with the new infrastructure, with basically the new HPE 380 or the similar models of HPE solutions, we're able to virtualize a customer's environments in minutes, not hours and days. That's been able to reduce our services cost and improve our customer retention, as well as the customer end-user experience. We've been able to take their environment and bring it online, and then virtualize the environment very fast.

Room for Improvement

Pricing is always a concern for our clients, so my guess is if anything can be beat it's price. It's knocking the price down to compete with the white-box vendors out there. If we were able to compete in any other area it would to compete in that space.

Stability Issues

With the new models of HPE 380 and similar models that HP's released, firmware upgrades, software upgrades on side the end-user experience with the virtualization engines has become a lot easier. The amount of time and effort for engineers to actually go and deploy those new drivers' software and firmware have been reduced from days/weeks to hours, making it far easier for any end-user to actually go and deploy a firmware update on their hardware infrastructure, without having to do an enormous amount of mitigating testing.

Scalability Issues

I don't have any problems with it. From a bare metal standpoint, we used to simply just throw in another pizza box. I know the HPE 380 is able to scale out our solutions fast and easy.

Customer Service and Technical Support

I have seen level 1 support has been decent over the last year. I'd rate them 3/5, but as you work your way up into the higher level support environment you can see that the technologists have been in the industry for a while and they've been able to resolve the problems faster, so when we get to the level 2s and the level 3 technologists, the problems really get mitigated quickly, and customer satisfaction is positive. So I'll rate them at a 4.5/5.

Initial Setup

Straightforward for the most part. There are limitations. For example in the virtualization engine of the J80, the Instant On, which is a OneView Instant On product line. It does work great, as long as you have your infrastructure. Our clients give us all the necessary requirements, such as the AD and IP address, the DNS, the subnets and stuff. As long as all that works seamlessly, then we can usually bind that HP 380, the Instant On into the infrastructure seamlessly. Does it always work smooth? No. But that's not necessarily HP's fault, it's because the infrastructure doesn't always lend itself to easy integration.

Other Advice

As HPE is making lead way with the HPE 380, coming up with a single pane of glass to automate VMware. Today the back hall is VMware seeing over virtualization. I have to say I am immensely interested in watching how Docker and HPE's adoption of Docker disrupts the virtualization environment, and I'll be honest with you, I cannot wait until they come out with a single pane of glass that allows me to deploy virtual machines using Docker.

That's really going to be a game changer in the industry and reduce our costs, because it's going to give more competition to one of the largest leading virtualization engines on the planet, VMware. It's a good product now. If they don't keep moving forward with it, ingesting like Docker like I mentioned. If they don't keep looking forward to that, then it's going to quickly wane. And over the next 2 years, I see that thing coming to a head that it needs to incorporate Docker into its solution of the product. Without that being incorporated, it's going to lose its cutting edge and the competition is going to come right in behind it.

High level it. You wanna choose a hardware? Choose the hardware from a virtualization engine standpoint that has proven to be number one in the world, you want to choose a server that actually stands the test of time. What I mean by that statement is, we choose HPE servers because they're rock solid. We never have failures with them. But when we do have a problem, which is rare, case in point we had a firmware issue on a driver that HPE took on, went right up to level 3, and the engineering time was able to remediate our business impact within 24 hours. Able to give us a driver permanent fix in two weeks time. There's not a lot of vendors that are willing to go above and beyond like that. So I will say that I'm very pleased with our choice of the hardware.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We're a partner and reseller.
Diego Caicedo Lescano
Chief Innovation Officer at SAGGA
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
We're able to create, develop, and test software against virtual services that simulate real service behavior with no constraints, and it's available anytime.
Service virtualization enables our teams to create, develop, and test software against virtual services that simulate real service behavior with no constraints, available anytime. This capability helps us keep our project on schedule even when we can’t develop or test the real versions of applications, dependent systems, and services. It accelerates development and tests with an end-to-end application environment. It simulates a service’s behavior in a production environment. This simulation software enables in-house development and testing teams to keep to their schedules regardless of access to production systems.

Service virtualization enables our teams to create, develop, and test software against virtual services that simulate real service behavior with no constraints, available anytime.

This capability helps us keep our project on schedule even when we can’t develop or test the real versions of applications, dependent systems, and services.

It accelerates development and tests with an end-to-end application environment. It simulates a service’s behavior in a production environment. This simulation software enables in-house development and testing teams to keep to their schedules regardless of access to production systems.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partners
it_user367809
Sr Systems Engineer - Quality Assurance at a consumer goods company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
It's a much less expensive solution than building many environments and we can turn them off and on when we need to.

Valuable Features

Most importantly for us, it integrates well with other products and we're able to get great support from partners and from HP.

Improvements to My Organization

Everyone needs test environments, dead environments, environments for performance testing, a stage environment, etc. We can build them, but they're expensive. With Service Virtualization, it's much less expensive and we can turn them off and on when we need to.

Room for Improvement

The latest release of Service Virtualization had a great improvement to the management interface. However, there are still a few things missing.

For example, it's missing a feature to view multiple pages of the different projects that have virtualized services. It still requires us to go only one page at a time, and sometimes we virtualize thousands of services. So there should be a feature to allow a choice to view 20 or 50 projects at a time.

Another missing feature is the ability to select all or turn off all listed projects simultaneously. Right now, if we want to see just one project, we have to uncheck the boxes for 19 of them. Being able to "turn off all" or "turn on 1" would be a nice feature.

Finally, we initially only had the need to be able to do SOAP and REST services as well as some JBBC databases. However, we now need support for some Oracle products, which the solution doesn't have right now. HP added support for SAP recently, and we'd like to see the same for Oracle.

Deployment Issues

It deploys well without issues.

Stability Issues

The stability seems to be very solid. Our boxes are idle, oversized, and don't have memory leaks. When they're in use, they're very stable without any performance of memory spikes.

Early on though, we saw some stability issues with the design that would occasionally crash. If we used it for six straight hours with many projects open, it had stability issues. But the design has been improved and the current version seems very stable, both on the server and design side.

Scalability Issues

We threw tens of thousands of requests per hour at it, totaling hundreds of thousands of requests, but the box seems as if it were just idle as it handled the load. It scales very well.

We plan on virtualizing significantly more things in the next three to six months. We don't feel the need to have to change hardware, buy additional licenses, or add more servers. We feel we're ready to go for quite a while.

Customer Service and Technical Support

Service Virtualization support is great, and I'd rate each tech support specialist highly. It's better than support for, say, LoadRunner, ALM or UFT. Service Virtualization tech support seems to have good logging so they can track what I've done in response to issues. They can see patterns and issues.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user365925
Technical and Functional Analyst at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
With this solution, I don't have to use our production services for implementing other software uses. Other solutions have more functionalities and better licensing policies.

Valuable Features:

This is an important product in both the production and test environments.

Improvements to My Organization:

With this solution, you don't have to use your production services for implementing other software uses. It saves us time, effort, manpower, and cost, in particular.

Room for Improvement:

Other solutions have more functionalities.

Scalability Issues:

It could needs to be a lot more scalable.

Valuable Features:

This is an important product in both the production and test environments.

Improvements to My Organization:

With this solution, you don't have to use your production services for implementing other software uses. It saves us time, effort, manpower, and cost, in particular.

Room for Improvement:

Other solutions have more functionalities.

Scalability Issues:

It could needs to be a lot more scalable.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user360591
Senior Technical Tester with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
We get view commonality, so rather than developers and test groups creating their own mocks of environments, they'll have one project service with a tool set that does the same thing.

Valuable Features

The main thing for us is that it does what we need it to do. There are many other product out there in the marketplace that will claim huge feature sets, but at the end of the day, you're actually looking for a product that just does what you need it to do.

Specifically, it's easy to set up and to get all your instructions from the HP website. You don't have to go through these horrible pre-sales and marketing pitches to get access.

Improvements to My Organization

I think a big thing for us is a tighter market and a reduction of wastage. We have a number of end points in the environment that are not terribly reliable. If they failed, then we could end up with tens of hundreds of people suddenly not being able to test or validate.

With Service Virtualization, we can replace them with something that is much more stable. We also get view commonality, so rather than developers and test groups creating their own mocks of environments, they'll have one project service with a tool set that does the same thing.

Also, we've got a high level of compliance now with everyone using the same tool. The downside is, if it's wrong, it's wrong for everybody. The upside is that everybody's testing against the same thing so we have a degree of commonality. When all these developers are doing the unit tests, once we get to the multiple test environment, we're unlikely to see a different problems caused by different issues.

Room for Improvement

One of the key components of the tool for us is the ability to write scripted rules in JavaScript or C#. As it stands now, the debugging capacity within the tool is fairly limited. I think some formal integration with an external ID that measures videotaping, like eClerx, would be nice in a future release.

Deployment Issues

There have been no issues with deployment.

Stability Issues

In the four months we've used it, I've had no stability issues with very good load on the platform.

Scalability Issues

We're early in the journey, but so far no issues with scalability.

Customer Service and Technical Support

We've had a relationship now with the R&D team and that's been instrumental for us in making the decision to buy the product, and their involvement in addressing issues. The reality is that we have a legacy IT infrastructure and it's not going to change. The virtualization tool hadn't quite met our needs and they have been very responsive in fixes and patches.

Other Advice

I think the beauty of being able to order the 30 day trial from the HP website means that you can actually get in there and look, unfettered by the sales and marketing people, and actually understand what the product does for you and your organization.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user285366
Senior QA Manager at a retailer with 1,001-5,000 employees
Video Review
Vendor
I found that it's fast to stand up a virtual service and start consuming it. I would like to see better documentation of the REST API.

What is most valuable?

Some of the valuable features that I found in the tool is: we’re a big TIBCO shop so there’s a lot around TIBCO that has been very valuable for us, TIBCO EMS Virtualization. We have a little MQ, MSMQ so that was enticing, haven’t really dabbled in that much yet. The ability of bringing down net services, have it stand up all the virtual endpoints pretty quick and put it into a learning mode to where I can turn it on, let the functional testers test against real services all day, take that snapshot, turn it over to my performance test team, minor tweaks, and now I’m running a full performance test with faked out third parties with minimal development effort on my side, that’s awesome. Another feature that, it’s still in beta but it’s coming up that’s, I’m already starting to leverage is the scripted role that they put out there. It’s Javascript and C#, we’re a heavy C# shop. So I have my choice of developers. I go around and say, hey help me develop something that’s a little smarter, a smarter, server-virtualized service and, you know it’s easy ‘cause I just show it to ‘em, they get it and stand it up, and it’s good.

How has it helped my organization?

So some other benefits I actually think I made the tool do something it wasn’t really meant to do but it worked perfect for my environment. So we had a big project to tokenize credit cards. We wanted to get out of the business of hanging on to credit card numbers because of the inherit risk. So we had a massive project to come in tokenize those credit cards. One problem is the vendor much like any other third party comes back and says, well we don’t have a performance environment for this so… And if you performance test against our environment we’re gonna cut your access off because that’s gonna impact other people. So naturally the team turned to me and said, hey what do we have, can we virtualize this? I reviewed what they were doing and it was not a service call, it was actually a website form post. So I turned the call into rest call, slid it into the config file, told it to point to my service virtualization, and it worked just like an HTML post call and it worked perfectly. We were up and running probably within a day with this virtualized uh, endpoint. I couldn’t believe it ‘cause that’s not what the tool was made for, but it worked perfect. So that was one of those added benefits, undocumented features, right?

What needs improvement?

I had to think about that a bit about what additional features I’d like in service virtualization quite a lot while here, especially when the solution architects are saying hey, we know you. Improvements, more like enhancements, with the rest API would be one. I think another thing I would rather see them implement is better use for their data driven model. Right now they’re using excel spreadsheets. I would like to see them implement a database instead of excel spreadsheets ‘cause sometimes you open excel spreadsheet that the data driven model built and it’s like 200 sheets big, it’s unmanageable. But the SQL server implementation that they provide now is through the-through the scripted roles and C#, and that’s not gonna be great for non-C# developers or JavaScript or you know, something at that point. They need to make it as part of the core tool.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability of the product, it’s still a work in progress. There are sometimes that, just honestly I do have to go onto the system and, just the other day we had one service that had been running for months with no problem, and then for some reason it just stopped working. I could’ve reached out to support to get an answer. They’re usually pretty responsive and get it solved for me pretty quickly, but for the sake of expediency because we were blocking people I had to go in and remove and rebuild service virtual-endpoint. The good thing is it took me 30 seconds to do it, the bad thing is I had all my data that I had saved gone. I could get it back, it’s not a big deal but-so stability wise it’s not bulletproof but I haven’t had a major outage until the other day of that one service. That hasn’t caused any issues, there’s been no ripple effects because of that.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I’ve had no problems with scale build. I’ve run, we’re doing a service gateway stress test right now in our production-like environment to understand if this gateway that we purchase is gonna be scalable for our big retail time period, fourth quarter time period. The service gateway said that they virtualize services which their definition of virtual services is different than a testing industry’s description of it. So I had to create my own endpoint, expose it through the gateway, execute stress test against it, and my bottleneck ended up being on the service gateway not on the virtual endpoint, and we were hitting well over 1,600 transactions per second. And my memory footprint on virtual machines. So that’s a virtual machine running service virtualization to was my CPU was probably right around 40 percent or so. So I still had way more scalability to go off this one instance.

How are customer service and technical support?

So on technical support, now this is where it gets a little tricky because I purchased this through a reseller. So my front line support does come from my reseller. I’ve had to have a few things escalated up to HP Support outside of that tier one level. They’re pretty responsive, they get back pretty quick, they’re very interested. I actually, I was kind of shocked when I was walking around HP Discover and I had a few of their solution architects go oh, we know you! You have success stories and you’ve had issues and I’ve looked into your issues. I’m like I don’t even know you, how do you know me? So it’s nice to know that they you know, that they have this, you know they definitely have a pulse on it They want to improve the product and be on top of things. They’re not looking to just kind of you know, fix it as it goes. You know, it’s just they want, they want to continuously improve it, so.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Going into the purchase of HP Service Virtualization, prior to the purchase we actually ran into quite a few gotchas with third parties, with integrations, internal integrations where teams weren’t quite ready with their services. You know the consuming clients at a point to where they were held up, delayed in their delivery. So we watched their delivery cycles actually go from being in sprint, in lock step, in delivering you know with a, let’s say a three or four week cadence, three or four sprint cadence, it would bunch out. They’d wait ‘til the services team completed all their work, all the functional testing before they would start consuming the services and I looked at that and saw the inefficiencies of it. I kind of pulled the ROI together of getting a tool, started playing with all the various tools, open source tools, other big vendors, and it just turned out that this one worked best in our environment. The biggest savings we’ve had from it is by mocking out our third party calls. We don’t have those you know, the one cent, two cent per call hits anymore, bills coming back to us. We don’t have to worry about performance testing so we can mock it out with the service virtualization. And the biggest gain for me, that was cool but the biggest gain for me was actually having our internal customers be able to dev in sprint with the services team. We save so much time doing that.

How was the initial setup?

I didn’t really have any hiccups with the installation, it’s pretty straightforward. There are a few things, if you want to use some of the new features that are in that beta mode that you have to go in and you have to be very familiar with how to modify specific config files. I’m just naturally inquisitive so I just started digging through the config files on my own. I don’t recommend that unless you’re just that kind of person but other than that just out of the box set-up is so easy to stand up. Maybe the most challenging thing that we had was, overcoming an issue with SQL server implementation because I didn’t realize that each user that accesses service virtualization has to have their own development database instance inside SQL server. So we all shared the same instance and kept overriding everyone’s work. I found it in the documentation, it was there. I’m one of those guys that kind of implements first and reads documents later, and once I found it my temper level went down with the vendor. Even though, I think there’s something that, I think that’s something that can be improved upon. You should be able to share databases, but outside of that everything else went pretty smooth.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We did look at the IBM Solution, I looked at ITKO LISA (CA LISA). We also looked into Ready API by SmartBear which the SmartBear one was gonna be a little too complicated for some of the team members I had. It wasn’t bad, it just was a little too complicated. IBM was coming in kind of at the same price but I guess I kind of had a little HP bias. LISA was just outrageous for our budget. We could not afford LISA, and I even worked with some people that worked at LISA in the Dallas area and said you know, you can’t afford it. It’s not gonna work so when we brought it and did the proof of concept I was told by quite a few people in the industry that said here’s the deal, if you get it in and you can implement the first service that you execute and it fires right up and it works for you, it’s gonna work for everything in your group. I brought it, implement it, it took me probably no less than 30 seconds to stand up a virtual service and start consuming it in my performance environment, I was sold from that.

What other advice do I have?

Some of the criteria I looked at while looking to purchase one of these service virtualization tools was ease of use because I’m gonna have to give it to my org, the QA team owns it, not the developers. The developers, the whole shift left idea for development works partially but they are so slammed to meet tight deadlines that I can’t throw another tool on them. On the other note I don’t have on my team, I have QA analysts so they’re not all completely technical, they dabble a little on it. So I wanted something that they could pretty much do a drag and drop into it. I wanted something that would be easy to discuss with my ops teams to let them understand what I needed deployed to be successful in the environment. I was blown away with how fast the implementation was. I took the demo off the website, deployed it, ran with engineering team, probably spent maybe half a day getting everything I needed stood up, and then shortly thereafter we just all right we’re gonna buy this ‘cause it’s working fantastic. Bought the license, dumped it right on top of it and it still kept going, I mean it was no problem. So ease of use you know the ability to quickly stand something up, you know. When I mean quickly I mean someone’s calling me on the phone saying I’m blocked, I need this. The ability to stand up and test immediately is huge.

Rating - I’d probably put it closer to six or seven because it’s still maturing to be honest, just to be out there about it. I know that they went through a major change between I think the 2.0 release into this 3.0 release. I didn’t buy it prior to that but I’ve been reading up on it. Stability’s been all right, the implementation needs a little assistance like I talked about. I would probably say ease of use really puts my number up. When I was grading it between the other ones that was top notch for me was the ease of use. I’d like to see maybe some more documentation around API’s that are available to it so I don’t have to use other HP tools to integrate with it because I don’t have a whole suite of HP tools at my company. So like your automation for example is not UFT, it’s ran through homegrown automation solutions. So I would-I know the rest API available but it’s not documented and I know was that I can extract that information but I don’t want to do it that way ‘cause that’s a lot of work on my part. So I’ve talked to-talked to their solution architects and they said that yeah, this will become available just hold on, we’re baking it out. So I’m a little impatient I guess. I want-you know, moving into like a dev ops world you kind of want to get away from a lot of manual clicks and make it fully automated as much as possible, and that’s one of the components for me to make it automated.

So when evaluating these tools make sure that it works for the infrastructure that you have. I talked to a former colleague that was researching tools out there. He had alreadypurchased Greenhead, IBM Greenhead, only to find out that he inherited it and he found out that he couldn’t do anything with MQ series. Which that was a pretty big blow for him because he really needed MQ series out. So make sure that your technologies are definitely supported by the tool. Do a very thorough proof of concept on it. I said it was really easy to set up and it was. It was fantastic, but we ran it through different scenarios. I brought out some technical specialist not from HP but my reseller to sit there and show us how it works with TIBCO EMS, how it works with you know WCS services. How is it-how does it work with rest? Do a full soup du jour on it in our environment. That’s probably the biggest thing I would say is, don’t do it on the canned services or websites that always work in demo mode, do it on your stuff. If it works on your infrastructure then it’s probably you’re gonna be in good shape.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
ITCS user
Architect at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Consultant
HP SV provides ease of use for multiple roles in IT and integrates to HP's suite of QA solutions.
HP Service Virtualization (SV) is industry leading with the backing of the world class organization HP behind it. HP originally went to market with ITKO as their original and only reseller.  During those several years they made their intent clear to ITKO that they would either acquire the company and/or engineer their own product.  CA acquired ITKO so HP then developed their own product specifically addressing the weaknesses of the ITKO - now CA Lisa product(s). In this context HP was not late to market but perhaps second to market.  This approach provided them an excellent approach to market analysis as well as product positioning, feature/functionality. HP SV is a fraction of the initial cost vs CA Lisa and a fraction of the overall cost of ownership.  It is the industry leader because…

HP Service Virtualization (SV) is industry leading with the backing of the world class organization HP behind it.

HP originally went to market with ITKO as their original and only reseller.  During those several years they made their intent clear to ITKO that they would either acquire the company and/or engineer their own product.  CA acquired ITKO so HP then developed their own product specifically addressing the weaknesses of the ITKO - now CA Lisa product(s).

In this context HP was not late to market but perhaps second to market.  This approach provided them an excellent approach to market analysis as well as product positioning, feature/functionality.

HP SV is a fraction of the initial cost vs CA Lisa and a fraction of the overall cost of ownership. 

It is the industry leader because of its ease of use and multiple roles that it can be used for in an IT organization.  CA's product is also good but requires heavy engineering skills to utilize.

Lastly, as a component of the entire Quality Assurance suite of products and solutions, HP SV integrates with the HP portfolio of testing tools.  This integration should be the value that drives any customer/company decision.  QA tools/products/solutions should be puzzle pieces that fit in with their suite of solutions addressing the SDLC (Software Development Life Cycle). 

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: My company is a HP partner
Product Categories
Service Virtualization
Buyer's Guide
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