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Microsoft Project Competitors and Alternatives

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SB
PMO Manager at a energy/utilities company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 5
Makes it a lot easier in our management team to be able to visualize and view the data that we're capturing

Pros and Cons

  • "PPM Pro has improved my organization through standardization. The big thing for us is that we came from a very immature state of play. Everyone had their own risk and issue management capabilities and their own different impacts for risks. We've been able to standardize that within the program delivery arena. That for us has been a major thing. We're all speaking the same language about the same things and using the same metrics in order to capture statuses."
  • "Reporting and dashboards need improvement. They've got the new beta coming out now and I've been playing around with that in our sandbox environment."

What is our primary use case?

Our primary use case of this solution is to capture all corporate business demand across the organization then to visualize that demand in a way that can be used by the senior management team to make decisions. We use it to collect a portfolio view of all projects that were in flight and various stages of the delivery lifecycle. We ride risk and issue management capabilities, capturing lessons learned, dependencies, plans, schedules, and resourcing. 

We also use it for:

  • The ability to manage and review resource information around availability, demand, and schedules. 
  • The ability to report on that information.
  • The ability to visualize our portfolios, that is key.
  • Finally, we're using that information in order to generate meaningful reports.

How has it helped my organization?

PPM Pro has improved my organization through standardization. The big thing for us is that we came from a very immature state of play. Everyone had their own risk and issue management capabilities and their own different impacts for risks. We've been able to standardize that within the program delivery arena. That for us has been a major thing. We're all speaking the same language about the same things and using the same metrics in order to capture statuses.

We are exploring its ability to provide decision-makers with the insight they need to empower decision-making. The big thing for us was just to get our projects moving and delivering. We've historically been through a number of challenges and organizational changes within our area and effectively, Planview has enabled us to get a really good picture of where we currently are. The biggest challenge we had initially was that our executive leadership team didn't know how much change was going on. With Planview, we've been able to capture that and provide the metrics in order to see what they want to do and what needs to be reprioritized. 

PPM Pro has also helped to reduce project delays by 50% in terms of highlighting common issues and risks. We hold monthly project reviews where everything is captured and we go through the project managers to highlight those high-level and high scoring risks and we are then able to take corrective action. The key thing is that we're using it as a tool to help support project managers. We're not using it to beat them up because they're not delivering stuff. It's really a tool to be able to surface those issues that wouldn't necessarily get surfaced.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is that it's highly configurable. It's a highly configurable solution. We can design and build stuff quite readily ourselves. It's also very flexible. We are also using it to help identify pinch points within the organization. As in, we can identify where people need support and additional help.

PPM Pro has reduced the time it takes to generate reports. That for us is a big thing. Instead of us spending our time doing collation and presentation activities, we're actually doing more value-add activities in terms of analyzing the data and trying to interpret what the data is telling us.

PPM Pro absolutely enables us to create reusable project templates that reflect our project management lifecycle. It enables us to quickly establish and build projects as and when they've moved through the governance lifecycle or parts of the early stages of the governance lifecycle. We're also able to configure the ability to print a standard type of project or program in some of the cases we've started exploring. In terms of the benefits, it's given a visualization to our senior management team of where things are at any particular time and they have the ability to drill down into the detail where necessary or keep it as high level as they need.

It's literally just the click of a button to create a project in PPM Pro. It's a very quick process. The key thing that we have is the governance processes and the approach for capturing enough information. In terms of that, the lifecycle is about two or three weeks, but actually being able to get a project into the system is exceptionally quick. You can build workflows to help support that. We don't use it at the moment, but it has the ability to build workflows.

I would say it's quite straightforward to build a team within a project. It's very easy. It comes back to data and I think it's the same with any PPM tool, the tool is only as good as the data that you've got in there. We did a lot of work initially to make sure that our resources were in place. It's just a case of project managers being able to select who they want on their teams and vice versa. If they're not sure, we also have the ability to set up resources as well and then our resource managers to select people that they want to start based on their availability.

In terms of viewing schedules, I would rate PPM Pro's ability an eight or nine out of ten. It's a very similar interface to Microsoft Project, which I'm sure a lot of project managers are very used to in terms of the details pages. It's a very nice layout in terms of navigation. You can select your ability to view different timeframes and you can view a purely word-based view of your plan. There is the Gantt chart availability as well. It's very easy and quick to switch between the two. You can also drill down into specific details at a task level summary task and you can bulk upload or update tasks. 

At the moment, we don't actually use timesheets or its ability to allocate hours. Integrating and using timesheets is on our roadmap but we don't use it at the moment. From the exposure that I've had in terms of playing around with it, it seems pretty fully functioning and it gives us the information that we want to be able to capture. And then it's how we then suck that information out to then push into our external systems or corporate systems.

We always had a very high number of projects. We have around 30 going at the moment and they're quite significantly sized projects. In terms of the number of projects, I think the biggest challenge we have is getting resources on board in order to manage them. We can certainly capture them and we can identify where the pinch points are. It's just our recruitment process is quite a slow process. In terms of being able to run projects, we can actually identify what we can run based on the constraints that we have at the moment, whether that be financial or resource-based, and we use the information from PPM Pro in order to provide that.

What needs improvement?

Reporting and dashboards need improvement. They've got the new beta coming out now and I've been playing around with that in our sandbox environment. I'm very impressed with the flexibility and functionality. In fairness, I was speaking to my senior management team and saying that we should go ahead and enable it in our production environment because I think it is actually now in the position where we can start getting it in place. 

Another area for improvement, realistically, is regarding the financials, but it's been addressed as part of Planview's focus. That's one of the things that drew us towards Planview, that they're actively investing in developing the tool and making it best of breed. We can certainly see a lot of new enhancements coming forward that we're going to be taking on board.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using PPM Pro for over two years now. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I've never seen any issues with stability. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We've had no issues with scalability. Being a software as a service, the amount of power that we need is determined by the number of licenses that we have.

There are 30 to 40 project managers. We have business partner managers who are the key interface in the business. We also have a number of resource leads. There are around 20 resource leads who are responsible for ensuring that resource demand can be met with the availability of their team members on that side.

Maintenance purely happens in the background. If we're developing new configuration changes, we'll do that ourselves in the sandbox and release it at an appropriate time. It's very minimal impact.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support is excellent. We've had some issues that have been dealt with very efficiently. There's a very quick response time and the consultants themselves are very capable in terms of responding to our questions, not just about tool configuration, but also best practices in the wider industry, specifically for where we work.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We use Microsoft Project and Teams as well as part of this process. It's been a while since I've used the Microsoft Project tool suite. Microsoft Project has a lot of different types of applications to store different types of data within the project. For example, for risks and issues, we'd have to create a team site in SharePoint, for example, whereas in Planview, it's an all in one application. I'm very quick to be able to jump around to individual areas within the system. We're at the very early adoption stage of Teams at the moment. 

There are pros and cons to each. In terms of speed, because it's on-premise, the local application is very quick. The downside with Projects is that it is very difficult to aggregate that data together. With Planview, bearing in mind that software is a service, it has so many opportunities to configure the system and also lock it down as much as you want, as long as you can get that standard configuration. With Microsoft Projects, it's very difficult to get that standard. You'll have people managing projects in the way that they're used to, which then becomes a big issue for us to translate that into the standardized reporting. Whereas with Planview, we can lock that down. We know exactly what our project managers need to enter when they're not entering information that we need and it's just a click of a button to get a report out when we need it.

Before PPM Pro we were using Microsoft Project desktop with Excel PowerPoint. It was a case of 90% of our time was spent collating information and presenting it in PowerPoint rather than actually doing the value-add work, which was to do the analysis on what data is actually telling me.

How was the initial setup?

I was involved all the way from product selection through to delivery and handover. The initial setup was fairly straightforward. As an organization, we had some challenges internally in that we were a brand new department delivering programs. We hadn't really got our processes set outright, but certainly, with the support and help from the Planview consultants who were working with us very closely and regularly meeting on a weekly basis, it was certainly a very straightforward piece. Once you get your head around how things are set up and the different terminology, it is actually quite a straightforward application to enhance yourself in terms of how you want to build it forward.

From the start of actually signing the contract, the deployment took around about three months, to the point where we had the projects in Planview and us actually using it practically.

Our strategy was originally going to be a big bang but we thought that there's only so much change that our project managers can manage. We took a few key elements and the first pieces were to get the demand requests in place so that we could see what demand we've got coming through. Then the next part was getting the projects and programs into Planview, and being able to start reporting on those projects. From there, we then started introducing the resource management side of things. More recently we've been looking at portfolio management and prioritization. Looking into the future, we're talking more about enhancing that portfolio management and demand capability and bringing the two together. That's more of an organizational thing rather than Planview. We've got the basics in there to get us where we need to be.

What was our ROI?

I wouldn't be able to quantify ROI in terms of the work that we're now focused on. We're doing many more kinds of value-add activities. Rather than having to go around and aggregate information together and then try and report it, we can make those recommendations now. We are also able to highlight those risks and issues before they actually become a true challenge to the company and to the delivery of that project.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The key thing is to really get a good understanding of your stakeholders that are going to actually use it. It's differentiating between those that are going to be physically updating Planview information, versus those that are reading it and then just building your models around how you're going to use it because then you can effectively build your licensing models to support that. In some cases, you can save some money there.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We evaluated Planisware. In terms of maturity, PPM Pro was a much better fit for our organization. It was also highly configurable, so we could do a lot of it ourselves. It gave us the opportunity and a roadmap that as we mature, we can mature with Planview and still maintain our data. Whereas, some of the other tools were coming in right at the top end. Cost-wise, it was certainly one of the better value products that we had assessed the amount of functionality and flexibility that you got with the tool.

What other advice do I have?

My key advice is to standardize your terminology for projects and programs in portfolios; create a roadmap. Don't be afraid to say no, because  you'll get different project managers with different experiences. Everyone will want to say, "Oh yeah, this is what I've done in the past and what I've done in the past," but don't be afraid to say no.

One of the challenges with any PPM tool is that if it's not Microsoft, then people aren't normally interested and I think the other side is that actually by centralizing this stuff, you're exposing weaknesses of project managers that they may not feel comfortable with. Try and position it as this is here to help you and to help us identify where we need to give further support. It's not there to question your ability or capability. It's here to give us that information that we can then help you to deliver.

We spent far too much time aggregating data from many different data sources. Having it in a single central place, we get one version of that truth. Everyone's aligned, everyone's standard and it makes it a lot easier for us in our management team to be able to visualize and view the data that we're capturing.

I would rate PPM Pro a nine out of ten. I think there's still room for improvement but there's a very active roadmap.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
JR
Strategist at a healthcare company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
The transparency and ability to drive ownership to the person who owns a task has been very helpful

Pros and Cons

  • "I love the collaborative nature just from my role to help. I'm a strategist. I help manage those large strategic projects. Implementation is one significant piece of my role, but I love the collaboration that can exist within the tool."
  • "The reporting end of it needs improvement. There should be more reporting, more data at your fingertips. It should be easier and a little more user-friendly. I know there is some there, but it's just how do you get more meat on the bones, if you will, of what's available."

What is our primary use case?

We use it for a lot of large strategic projects from an implementation perspective. We used to have rather large Excel files that we were managing task and project work to be done. Then, we transition all of those work plans into Projectplace. We use it for large strategic project implementations, the new cancer center, we are currently using it for a new hospital tower that we're opening up this fall, and things like that. So large strategic projects is primarily where I use it.

We have some service line leadership teams across our healthcare organization that we use to manage their work that's aligned with our mission and vision and so we use it for a lot of those teams. Across our organization, we have a lot of teams that are using it for a myriad of different reasons and it keeps growing. We have an accrediting body called "joint commission." They'll survey your facility and show where there are some opportunities for improvement. When our quality team gets that, they've used Projectplace to create some standard work using those ways within that combined view to really manage their work. That's the same work that needs to be accomplished once one of those surveys comes back in. They've set up that standard work and now they use that for every survey across all of our different facilities.

That was a really cool use case that I was involved with helping them design but that's being used across the organization as well. There's some work intake because we also have PPM Pro. From a work intake perspective, there are a lot of teams that are managing work intake and then creating projects in Projectplace or cards in the workspaces as a result of that. That's just the tip of the iceberg of what our organization is using it for.

How has it helped my organization?

Using PPM Pro has improved our work intake but then funneling that into Projectplace helped to facilitate that work intake. It's just clarity of the work and visibility that needs to be done. The upgraded visibility across what's in process or what needs to happen across the organization has been helpful. That means the transparency, the ability to drive that ownership to the person that actually owns the task has been very helpful. We're in the fairly infant stages of using it but it's quite a bit with many strategic projects that we have going on.

What is most valuable?

I love the collaborative nature just from my role to help. I'm a strategist. I help manage those large strategic projects. Implementation is one significant piece of my role, but I love the collaboration that can exist within the tool. We're still trying to work through that but the ownership and trying to get people to really gauge and use the tool when you have 13,000 to 14,000 people across the organization isn't easy. It could be challenging because not everyone jumps right in the feet and feels comfortable with the technology, but the ability to drive ownership and visibility into what's going on is just wonderful from my perspective as trying to empower the teams that I manage. That's been very, very helpful.

I like Projectplace for working with detailed implementation plans for projects. Early, when I first started using it, it was just trying to get over a mental hurdle of how not to lose the details. There are so many different ways in which you can set up a workspace, the activities, the cards, and using a checklist on the cards. There are so many different ways in which you can set it up. It's fun to think through how to best transition those detailed work plans into the Projectplace environment. Its work. It's almost like there's so much ability to set it up to meet the team's needs or a specific project is good and bad in terms of having the options available to you. It's challenging at times because there are so many options but it's very flexible.

I think it's a very flexible tool for detailed work plans because we have a new hospital tower that we're opening now. I used to have a 350 to 400 row Excel file. We were considering rather large files that we got narrowed down into some more concise workspaces in Projectplace. Flexible is a keyword I would use.

Projectplace tracks work details and completion milestones. I normally try to set up as many milestones as possible. One of the challenges is the data that's from it if you try to mix people. People want to see more operational metrics or KPI finances, things like that. Things that aren't really project or task-related. I would say they're concerned about how other things are going related to a significant project and those things aren't always available but we can, obviously based on the activities and things, report cards, progress, milestone completion, and some other things. I know it's just a challenge. I know our leader that manages the tool and collaborates with Planview is really focused on metrics, reporting, and how we keep making that more robust. Finding a way to take it another layer down into a more detailed look at metrics and things outside of project metrics is a challenge. It's a challenge getting that fine layer of detail.

It definitely supports collaboration in real-time. The only challenge there is, is trying to manage the change of the way people do work. It definitely supports collaboration in real-time, and there are many people that have jumped in and use all the time. But then for my seat, I also need to know that an individual is not quite there yet. I may need to follow up with a separate note. I may need to follow up with a phone call or something to check-in. It does work. It's getting people to buy in and actually use it and get over the mental hurdle of understanding that it's not additional work, it's just a different way to do work. 

We also use Microsoft Teams as an organization so people need to understand how the different tools work and how they relate to one another and that sort of thing. Yes, it works, it's just getting over that hurdle as an organization of getting people to buy into, to using it in that fashion.

The overall visibility in the project status provided by Projectplace is okay. It should be a little more robust. I know we have some of it set up. I don't know all the details for certain types of projects. We can put in a specific project status, but for many projects, we don't have that functionality turned on and it's very vague. I don't know the behind the scenes of what someone is doing, but there are certain projects where the only status that people could see is very vague in terms of task and tasks completed. It doesn't talk about the details of the three potential barriers. Some people want to know a little more detail. We do use some functionality that is turned on for certain projects that we use that people can submit a project status and that's helpful. But we don't use it across the board. I don't know the details of what someone's turning off or on and why that's the case. I'm seeing that across different projects and different workspaces.

This ability to allow other teams to see into our project status affects my organization. One of the huge benefits, even just with the integration with PPM Pro, since we use that as well and Projectplace, we've had a huge leap forward in terms of visibility across the organization of just what's out there. What's available in terms of projects, what's currently going on and we organize that, based on the hospital service line. We organize those things that people could easily drill down and say, "Hey, what's being worked on"? We slice and dice that in numerous different ways. The visibility has been great. It's just so we can have a huge initial step and our internal team's done a great job to work with Planview to help build some of those dashboards and things and actually do that in PPM Pro. I think there's some room to make it even more robust down the road. But there is great visibility early on. There are things that never existed before.

It has helped to track resources allocated across multiple projects. Within PPM Pro we have some of that visibility. I don't know that we see that within Projectplace, they've been splitting hairs, but I don't know that Projectplace allows us to see that. For example, with the projects I'm leading, I'm aware of who's on all of them and the usual suspects right across our organization. But I don't know if it's organization-wide, if we're there yet, by using Projectplace.

Projectplace definitely dynamically updates schedules as progress is made. It's great. The real-time nature of it all is a great piece to have real-time changes. People are able to see those activities and how they may have changed. That visibility is great. Then I use the conversation piece and really communicate with the team there as well. That real-time change is really helpful from my perspective.

What needs improvement?

The reporting end of it needs improvement. There should be more reporting, more data at your fingertips. It should be easier and a little more user-friendly. I know there is some there, but it's just how do you get more meat on the bones, if you will, of what's available. If I were to be an executive wanting to see a summary of my project, how do I better understand what's really going on? Is there a way to do that? Projectplace is the right place to do that, to store some of those updates and KPIs and that sort of thing. 

They should make more robust reporting.

Anytime our organization submits some feedback Planview is awesome with thinking through it, making changes, and putting in future releases. It's great to be able to provide feedback and our internal team has done that and there have been numerous changes. It's great. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Projectplace for one and a half years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I've had no issues with stability. Occasionally I'll see something that looks funny, I refresh it and it's fine. As a user, I haven't had any issues with the performance.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability is performing fine. It's the cultural change management side of bringing people along this journey because we're really in the infant stages, it can only have been a year and a half or so, we're still early in that journey. It's bringing people along. I think the tool's working wonderfully. I know we add more and more stuff to it every week if not every day. The tool's working fine from that perspective. It's the other end of it and bringing people along in that journey.

We're not looking to increase usage. I know there are some rather significant initiatives coming forth that we're going to roll out as an organization that's going to be hundreds of people engaged and we're going to use Projectplace as the primary collaboration space to manage that work. I know there is some big thing that's coming up that we're going to use the tool for as the primary source of truth in terms of what the work is, the work that needs to be done, and the status of that work.

We're looking forward to getting that going and nothing else specific outside of that that I haven't mentioned already in terms of the types of work. I would have envisioned more portfolio usage to organize multiple projects or workspaces along with some bigger initiatives. I could potentially see that in the future.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't dealt with technical support. I go to our internal team and they help me get the answer. I haven't had to reach directly out to Planview. All of the help information on the website is wonderful, straightforward, short, and sweet. I can usually find the answer I need and just go onto the website.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Prior to Projectplace, we were using Excel spreadsheets. Then we used Microsoft Project. It's a fine tool for what it is. It just lacks the collaboration, lacks visibility across different projects and across an organization. It's fine for a specific project in what it does but there are a couple of key differences that make Projectplace a pretty powerful tool.

How was the initial setup?

I don't know the behind the scenes set up that had to take place to make it happen but from a user's perspective, it was seamless. It was a couple of pieces of information, it links to our single sign-on for our organization. From a user perspective, it's super simple.

The setup took around six months. It felt fairly short from when I started hearing about it from our internal team to when that was getting rolled out. We rolled it out to certain groups first and started using it. It took around six to nine months.

It's pretty minimal in terms of day to day maintenance. There's a team of four, however, one doesn't work in there a lot. I think it's really only a director, one staff, that's working behind the scenes and some of that's PTM-Pro related too, it's not all Projectplace.

We have hundreds of users. We're over a thousand in terms of people that have accounts but it could be someone is not using it.

What other advice do I have?

Any department that's used it has seen the value. It's just the change of getting people to buy in, use it, and look at work in a different way. That's the key. Anyone who's used it has had a very positive experience, to my knowledge. It's very broad in terms of our organization of who's getting the value out of it.

From an organizational perspective, the transparency and accountability across a project, and the work that needs to be done is just wonderful. There's a ton of value as an organization for the transparency and accountability of work that needs to be done.

My advice would be to focus on the communication on the change side of it. The tool's awesome. It works. It's a wonderful tool, it's a great way to manage the work and do the work. 

I would rate Projectplace a nine out of ten. It's been a nice tool. I like seeing things visually as well. So I think it's the ability to have some detail, but the visualization of work and activities and things like that is very helpful and very powerful.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
JD
IT Project Manager at Gravity Diagnostics
Real User
Top 20
Designed for project management, meets all IT software development needs, and integrates with Power BI

Pros and Cons

  • "The roadmap feature and the ability to integrate with Power BI are probably the most valuable features in it. It is a great solution. I absolutely love it. It is a tool that was designed for project management, and it has been awesome to work with it so far. I also love Confluence."
  • "They can maybe dumb down the directions for building the automation a little bit because to be able to build out the automation, I had to play around with it and learn what all the fields meant and what they were referencing. I don't have an IT background originally. My background is in biology, and I got into project management by chance. I am good at it, but I haven't really worked with coding languages. In terms of writing automation, it is easier for devs because they intuitively know what they're being asked, but as a PM who originally didn't have IT experience, it was a little bit daunting at first. It could also have an extra hierarchy to be able to allow tasks under stories. It could be the way it is set up at our organization, but currently, under stories, you can have sub-tasks, but you can't create a task. Being able to customize your hierarchy a little bit more would be beneficial because sometimes, the devs would say, "Well, here's a story, and now we need sub-tasks," but as we were building out the sub-tasks, sometimes we had to go a step lower to dig in a little bit more, and we couldn't do that."

What is our primary use case?

We used it in my previous organization for project management, product management, and release management. In my current organization, where I started working a week ago, we are using Jira strictly for help-desk tickets. We are using DevOps for our release management. So, we've got DevOps, Jira, and some homegrown stuff, and I'm trying to figure out what's going to work best for this new organization.

I've used Jira and Confluence previously, and this is my first time using the help-desk ticketing system. It is cool and not a whole lot different than SolarWinds or Zendesk, except the appearance of it is more Jira.

How has it helped my organization?

We were using Microsoft OneNote for systems engineering and network engineering. It was being used for our documentation, environments, and services, and it was a nightmare. We transitioned everybody and copied everything into Confluence. We were then able to tag specific tickets to the notes, and there were links between what work was recently done and the most updated notes in Confluence.

What is most valuable?

The roadmap feature and the ability to integrate with Power BI are probably the most valuable features in it. It is a great solution. I absolutely love it. It is a tool that was designed for project management, and it has been awesome to work with it so far. I also love Confluence.

What needs improvement?

They can maybe dumb down the directions for building the automation a little bit because to be able to build out the automation, I had to play around with it and learn what all the fields meant and what they were referencing. I don't have an IT background originally. My background is in biology, and I got into project management by chance. I am good at it, but I haven't really worked with coding languages. In terms of writing automation, it is easier for devs because they intuitively know what they're being asked, but as a PM who originally didn't have IT experience, it was a little bit daunting at first.

It could also have an extra hierarchy to be able to allow tasks under stories. It could be the way it is set up at our organization, but currently, under stories, you can have sub-tasks, but you can't create a task. Being able to customize your hierarchy a little bit more would be beneficial because sometimes, the devs would say, "Well, here's a story, and now we need sub-tasks," but as we were building out the sub-tasks, sometimes we had to go a step lower to dig in a little bit more, and we couldn't do that.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for two years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It has never gone down for me. It was always reliable, even from the mobile app.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It was fine. It seemed to integrate with all of our systems with ease. At my previous organization, there were probably 500 or 600 people using Jira. There were many different roles including product management, project management, VPs of IT and Ops, IT data services, developers, network engineers, systems engineers, and CBAs. It was a full scale of IT professionals.

At my current organization, where I started working a week ago, we are using Jira, but there are only a handful of people who are actually using it. It is strictly for help-desk tickets. I am trying to implement it and roll it out to the organization on a much larger scale, and I'm going to have to talk to them about pricing and other things. In this new organization, there are probably about 500 or 600 employees in total. Assuming I get the buy-in from everyone, which I don't think would be a problem, I would probably need at least a hundred licenses for users and then expand from there as needed.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't interacted with their technical support, but I bet they would have been awesome.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have used Smartsheet, MS Project, and Trello. Jira is more software-development-specific and a much easier tool to use.

How was the initial setup?

In my previous organization, I believe its initial setup was complex. I was not at the administrative user level. I was given admin privileges for certain projects but not for the whole Jira. This is the first time I actually have admin privileges over all of Jira, and it was set up for me.

It probably took a few days. It would have also involved a lot of conversations and other stuff.

What about the implementation team?

It would have been in-house. In terms of maintenance, it didn't seem to need maintenance from our side.

What other advice do I have?

I would advise going with the entire Atlassian suite. Don't just use one aspect of Jira, unless you have a very specific need for using bits and pieces. Jira is better when Confluence and everything can be integrated, and you have source code management and all of that from the same software or platform.

I would rate Jira a ten out of ten. I love Jira. It has the ability to just do everything, and it is a one-stop shop for all of your IT software development needs.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Amazon Web Services (AWS)
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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CB
Immigration Technology Specialist at a legal firm with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 5
An intuitive and user-friendly solution that provides different types of views and has a good knowledge base and customer support

Pros and Cons

  • "It is pretty comprehensive when it comes to the different views that it gives you. It gives you a Gantt chart view, calendar view, board view, and list view. It is kind of helpful to have different types of views and see how it views your different tasks. I appreciate being able to do that. The biggest thing is that it is extremely user friendly. Asana is pretty intuitive. Someone who is not tech-savvy can kind of catch on quickly. It is better than other tools like Smartsheet. Some of the other tools like Microsoft Project and Excel are great tools, but you have to invest a lot of time to learn them, which is not the case with Asana."
  • "There could be some improvements in terms of how projects or day-to-day work is organized. One of the challenges when it comes to rolling out to an enterprise is the way the projects are organized. It has a kind of setup where you have different projects and tasks, but it is not as organized as Smartsheet when it comes to organizing projects or different teams. It can get really cluttered really fast. JIRA has another suite to submit the support tickets. It would be good if Asana could branch out to incorporate some kind of workflow. It is great for collaboration and recording work, but there isn't any workflow. It would be useful if they can map out a workflow of who approves what. This is kind of a big ask, and it is not geared towards that."

What is our primary use case?

I use it as a project management tool and as my day-to-day tool to capture and plan out my work.

It has business and professional editions. Currently, I am using the professional edition. I am using the latest version of this solution.

How has it helped my organization?

It has helped our organization. Everyone is kind of using the same software. Instead of having an Excel sheet here or a Word document there to capture work, we have everything in one system.

What is most valuable?

It is pretty comprehensive when it comes to the different views that it gives you. It gives you a Gantt chart view, calendar view, board view, and list view. It is kind of helpful to have different types of views and see how it views your different tasks. I appreciate being able to do that.

The biggest thing is that it is extremely user friendly. Asana is pretty intuitive. Someone who is not tech-savvy can kind of catch on quickly. It is better than other tools like Smartsheet. Some of the other tools like Microsoft Project and Excel are great tools, but you have to invest a lot of time to learn them, which is not the case with Asana.

What needs improvement?

There could be some improvements in terms of how projects or day-to-day work is organized.
One of the challenges when it comes to rolling out to an enterprise is the way the projects are organized. It has a kind of setup where you have different projects and tasks, but it is not as organized as Smartsheet when it comes to organizing projects or different teams. It can get really cluttered really fast.

JIRA has another suite to submit the support tickets. It would be good if Asana could branch out to incorporate some kind of workflow. It is great for collaboration and recording work, but there isn't any workflow. It would be useful if they can map out a workflow of who approves what. This is kind of a big ask, and it is not geared towards that.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Asana for the last three months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is stable. I don't know about any bugs or issues at the moment.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I have scaled it a little bit, but I haven't scaled it to fit the complete enterprise. I have mostly scaled it for a couple of teams using it. It was easy for small teams, but scaling it when you get to tens of thousands might be a challenge. It is great for small-sized and medium-sized businesses. 

Currently, we have just a few users. We have a data scientist, a technologist, and a manager.

How are customer service and technical support?

They have a really good customer experience team. I would give them a solid ten out of ten. They provide really good tech support, and they are very responsive. They set up a call with you and walk you through it. I appreciate that.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I used Excel. I switched to Asana because it is easier for most people to kind of see it live how the work is progressing. With Excel, you have to save the work, and someone else has to open it up, whereas, with Asana, it is live. That's the major takeaway in terms of capturing work.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is straightforward.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It has a free version.

What other advice do I have?

I would suggest looking through their knowledge base. They have a really good knowledge base for different use cases. I would even recommend trying out the trial, which is available for one month. With any tool, you just need to know what your specific needs are. 

I would rate Asana an eight out of ten because I'm still learning how to use it. It is not a tool that covers everything. It is good for my purpose, and that right now is just tracking the work and collaborating with other folks.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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