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One Identity Manager OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

One Identity Manager is #5 ranked solution in top User Provisioning Software and #6 ranked solution in top Identity Management (IM) tools. IT Central Station users give One Identity Manager an average rating of 8 out of 10. One Identity Manager is most commonly compared to SailPoint IdentityIQ: One Identity Manager vs SailPoint IdentityIQ. The top industry researching this solution is Computer Software Company, accounting for 29% of all views.
What is One Identity Manager?

One Identity Manager helps you mitigate risk, secure data, meet uptime requirements and satisfy compliance by giving your users access to data and applications they need and nothing more. IAM can be driven by business needs, not IT capabilities. With Identity Manager, you can manage user identities, privileges and security across the enterprise, putting you in control of identity management and taking the burden off your IT staff.

One Identity Manager is also known as Quest One Identity Manager, Dell One Identity Manager.

One Identity Manager Buyer's Guide

Download the One Identity Manager Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: October 2021

One Identity Manager Customers

Texas A&M, Sky Media, BHF Bank, Swiss Post, Union Investment, Wayne State University. More at OneIdentity.com/casestudies

One Identity Manager Video

Pricing Advice

What users are saying about One Identity Manager pricing:
  • "From a cost perspective, One Identity has the biggest bang for the buck."
  • "We pay yearly and per active user. One of the reasons that we chose One Identity Manager is because of the pricing. It is reasonable and affordable compared to other products which we considered before choosing this solution for the company."

One Identity Manager Reviews

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SS
Director, Global Identity and Access Technologies at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Enables us to automate SOX recertification, saving a significant amount of time

Pros and Cons

  • "The most valuable features include the automated attestations or recertification... The time that people have to focus on their real jobs and not spend it doing recertifications is huge."
  • "[Regarding] their upgrades, we're going to 8.12 right now and everything is running very smoothly but this is actually the first upgrade that has gone off well. Even the other "dots" have taken us six months or longer to get through QA testing."

What is our primary use case?

One of the key use cases is certifications for SOX applications. Another is centralized onboarding and offboarding. Another use case is the Self Service using the IT Shop, which gives us a repository of entitlements that people can request and then have the approval workflows, and document the approvals for SOX and other regulatory requirements.

The appliances we use for this solution are VMs. We went with that version because we're forced to. We're not allowed to use physical hardware. Our infrastructure group requires us to use VMs.

How has it helped my organization?

The process prior to One Identity was very manual for certification for SOX applications, using Excel spreadsheets etc. We were able to automate that process. Right now we're doing approximately 250,000 automated attestations every quarter. The time it takes to do those is greatly reduced. For example, with our financial system, reviews used to take two-and-a-half months to complete and now we have 90 percent compliance within two days. 

When it comes to onboarding and offboarding, prior to our launching of One Identity Manager, users were provisioned disparately across the globe in all of our offices. There was no consistency or structure. We have centralized that and it's based on the HR data for new hires. And more importantly for "leavers" — and that was always an audit point, for not catching the leavers — we have a feed from Oracle as well that promptly disables access on the user's last day of work. That is a key use case.

In terms of integrations, we have a custom connector with our ERP system, JD Edwards. The process to build the connector was lengthy. It took us about six months. It was not easy. But with it in place, we improved the time for doing the recertifications. Once they saw the efficiency of the attestations for that, everyone was wanting to get on board with other apps as well.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable features include the 

  • automated attestations or recertification
  • IT Shop, which reduced calls to the help desk by 60 percent from users not having to contact someone to request access to something. Now, they go to the Self Service portal. 

Those two are the biggest wins.

In addition, when it comes to usability and functionality, users are always the most difficult to please. But when we went to version 8, we actually had zero negative feedback. We had people who were praising the UI of the new version. It was very well received. We had no pushback or anything negative that we had to address.

Another huge win is that a lot of our producers and salespeople are constantly on the road, and making them log into a portal for approval was very difficult. Once we implemented the approval feature, those users were extremely happy with it. It saves time and helps the end-users to become productive sooner because they can do the approvals.

What needs improvement?

There is room for improvement to their password self-service tool. We're actually leaving that tool right now because it's just been horrible. We've discussed that with them, but for such an easy functional feature it is lacking. 

Number two is their upgrades. We're going to 8.12 right now and everything is running very smoothly but this is actually the first upgrade that has gone off well. Even the other "dots" have taken us six months or longer to get through QA testing. Those are the two key areas for improvement.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using One Identity Manager since 2013.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Once we went to version 8 it became very stable. Version 6 had a lot of issues with performance. But all of those were resolved with the new infrastructure and table structures. We are never down. We are 99.999 up.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

One of the reasons we bought One Identity was for scalability because we grow through acquisitions. We have about 40,000 internal users currently, but two years ago we only had 20,000. We knew that we would grow and would have to have something that would grow with us.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have really good support. We tend to deal with one support person in particular, so he knows our environment well. We have a great relationship with their support in general.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Avatier was our previous solution. It couldn't scale with us. It was for a company with one domain, but we have about 12 domains and one forest. Even though it sat on a .NET framework, we could not do our own development so we were constantly going back to the vendor for enhancements.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. It's really easy to install. The out-of-the-box functions really are out-of-the-box. You're not having to do a lot of custom development. 

This is our second-generation tool, our first generation being Avatier. With our use cases already defined in that — and that's probably the longest thing that it will take to get done to get across the finish line — we had One Identity up and running within less than three months.

Because we have multiple divisions around the world, we broke up our implementation by region and then by division within those regions. We would launch a division and then leave a week between and then launch the next one so that we always had time in between. That's one of the things that I tell people: Do not do a big-bang launch because it will not be successful. You have to do a rolling launch, in my opinion.

When it came to training, we broke it up into the various populations. We did end-users, we did managers, and we did requesters. We developed that training internally. We did on-demand training modules as well as live training. From an engineering perspective, I did send engineers to One Identity. However, out-of-the-box, it was pretty straightforward. Based on the knowledge transfer from Professional Services, they were able to adequately manage the tool.

What about the implementation team?

For our initial implementation, we used One Identity's Professional Services. Our experience with them was good. They knew the system and they were able to deploy our use cases.

Our migration project with iC Consult happened about two years ago. We were on version 6 and we had just started to undertake a move to version 7 but 8 had come out. We decided to go ahead and jump from 6 to 8. The reason we decided to do so was that that migration took nine months and, while version 7 did not have a UI change, 8 was going to have a UI change and we could not put our users through two upgrades. We had to think about our end-users and jumped straight to 8.

But iC Consult is phenomenal. I recommend them a lot. Many of their consultants and engineers came from the original Volcker Informatiks, which created the tool that we see today. Their employees have fundamental, foundational knowledge of the tool inside and out. They had the scripts, they knew the tables that needed to be restructured, inside and out. It was just an amazing, smooth process. I have colleagues who have fired up to three partners, in trying to get themselves migrated off of 6 to 7, because they were not successful. They are still on 6 and are trying to get funding — because they've thrown away so much money — so they can get iC Consult to come in because iC Consult just knows its stuff around the tool so well.

Our experience with iC Consult was outstanding. They were very involved. During our go-live weekend, Ulli, who is CEO of the Americas now, was pulled onto another project. They felt confident we would get through it without him, but at their own cost they sent another engineer to the US to be here during the migration. They were always very thoughtful around making sure that it would be successful and that we felt confident that the right resources were available.

Because of their knowledge, the iC Consult consultants were able to hit the ground running. So many consulting companies will come in and it takes them a while to get the lay of the land. They've got junior people on the account. We did not have that experience, thank goodness. I had come from a consulting company that was renowned for just not putting the best resources on projects and thus it stumbled and failed. The iC Consult consultants' maturity levels and their knowledge around the tools allowed them to hit the ground running with no issues.

We were completely satisfied. We have used them continuously since then. I have a very lean team — I only have three engineers to handle the global program. So iC Consult will do special projects that we just don't have the time to focus on. They can go off, uninterrupted, and handle those for us.

What was our ROI?

We have seen return on our investment with this solution, especially, as I mentioned, regarding the attestation recertification. The time that people have to focus on their real jobs and not spend it doing recertifications is huge.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We had gone into PoC, originally, with Avatier, CA, and Quest. But Volcker had been purchased by Quest soon after. We liked Quest, we liked our salesperson and when the tool began to grow and when we re-org'd and I was allowed to choose a different tool, we decided to do a PoC.

From a cost perspective, One Identity has the biggest bang for the buck. We do not have a large team and I cannot spend a lot on services. I wouldn't even look at the likes of IBM and Oracle because I know how expensive they would be.

What other advice do I have?

It isn't just this product. IAM projects never come in on time or on budget. It's just the nature of the beast. But definitely have your use cases thoroughly defined. If you have those, the configuration will come rather easily.

Even though customization is available, you need to be aware of the dependencies and the other features that may be negatively impacted if you don't do best practices. You want to make sure that you're using best practices and not just configuring something because that's the way it's done in your company. That could negatively impact the other features that do adhere to best practices.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Srivalli Sristla
IAM Engineering Manager at a construction company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Comes with a lot of out-of-the-box features

Pros and Cons

  • "We have been able to make our help desk self-sufficient by giving them role-based access. We have been able to reduce service dependency by 40% to 50%."
  • "Right now, they run an on-prem solution. Our preferred solution for cloud is Azure. So, we have yet to determine how we want to take this forward, because at this time, we are only using Graph APIs to do some Azure-related actions."

What is our primary use case?

We do employee lifecycle management through One Identity Manager with the source being SAP. We do not just do human accounts, like SAP accounts, but we also do non-human accounts, e.g., service accounts, shared mailboxes, distribution lists, and mail contact objects. We also use the API feature of One Identity Manager to provision from ServiceNow. These are its core functionalities.

How has it helped my organization?

We have been able to make our help desk self-sufficient by giving them role-based access. We have been able to reduce service dependency by 40% to 50%.

One Identity Manager has helped to increase employee productivity. This is because we provision the right accesses as part of user onboarding, then the user is ready to go. We send the initial login information, and everything is through the system. This has saved 60% to 70% of the onboarding time. The process is smooth.

What is most valuable?

One thing that I like about the product is it comes with a lot of out-of-the-box features. There is the occasional scripting here and there, but there are some out-of-the-box samples that you can follow. So, it has been pretty good. We have been able to work well with it.

I have found One Identity Manager to be flexible. It is mostly configurable. We get most of the features out-of-the-box. If not, we have some samples that we can follow, then model the system, accordingly.

As far as GDPR is concerned, our company is located across the globe. Based on user requirements at any given location, we have been exposing only those attributes. In that way it has been flexible so we can comply with GDPR.

What needs improvement?

In terms of the policy and role management features, I have a mix of opinions. In terms of role management, it is okay, but I would like to see the product go more towards attribute-based access management. Regarding the policies, it has been okay working for our environment so far, but I would like to suggest some improvement along the front of synchronization. That would be nice.

One Identity Manager has had a little bit of an impact on our cloud-IT strategy. Right now, they run an on-prem solution. Our preferred solution for cloud is Azure. So, we have yet to determine how we want to take this forward, because at this time, we are only using Graph APIs to do some Azure-related actions.

If there could be some connectors for more things, like a Cosmos DB connector, then that would be helpful.

It is a great product. I don't know why it is not so marketable in the US and not used as much in the US as opposed to the EU. Sometimes, I feel like it is very hard to find people because the solution is not as popular in the US. If you need to find new resources, it becomes tough since some people are hesitant to learn a product that is not well-known. It is hard to find some people with exactly this experience because it is not so popular in the US.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have used it for five and a half years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We haven't had any stability issues.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

So far, we haven't had issues with scalability. We are a global company, so we have dedicated servers for certain operations. The solution has been holding up well.

We have 20,000 to 25,000 users using One Identity Manager. We have roles ranging all the way from a user to the help desk. Then, we have a threat management team role, security operations role, and site administrator role. 

How are customer service and support?

We work directly with support. They are very prompt. I would rate them as eight or nine out of 10. They will help us based on the level of the ticket that we raise. Since their response has been very prompt, we basically have had no issues. 

Initially, we had issues and brought it up with their management. Since then, we can count on them if we have any problems.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before One Identity Manager, our company had a homegrown solution, but it did not hold up well. Earlier, non-human accounts were not managed with the legacy accounts. With One Identity Manager in place, we have now come a long way in terms of management. It has become the global system for our corporation in the past five and a half to six years. It has held up well. We are planning to expand it further.

Previously, I have worked with other solutions all the way from SAP Identity Management to Oracle Identity Manager. The maintenance and staff required to maintain One Identity Manager is a lot less compared to Oracle. For example, anybody can learn One Identity Manager easily. If anybody is not able to learn the product, it is really suspicious. One Identity Manager also has a lot of out-of-the-box features.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. We started with version 6. Now, we have upgraded all the way to version 8. It has been okay so far, except for one version change from 6 to 7.

The deployment time usually depends on the change. The initial deployment or an upgrade to an existing new version will take about a day to a day and a half from scratch.

We plan everything from scratch, from building the server, getting the data, and onboarding and synchronizing the users. Therefore, we have everything setup for day zero and forward with a solid implementation plan.

What about the implementation team?

Initially, when this was owned by Dell EMC, we had Dell EMC Professional Services for the very first feature. After that, we have been working mostly by ourselves. We have been partnering with IPConcepts in-between for the last couple of years, as needed. Now, IPConcepts has merged with IBM Works.

It has been a good experience working with IBM. We have worked with them over the last four years. When we needed to engage with them, there weren't any issues.

We have had pretty good people on our team so far:

  • For deployment, one or two people were needed. 
  • For maintenance, our team is very small. We have two or two and a half people at all times. 

Now, we are looking to augment the team as the system grows. As we are growing, we need more functionality and to automate a few things. Until they are automated, we need an in-between stop-gap in terms of resources.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We pay yearly and per active user. One of the reasons that we chose One Identity Manager is because of the pricing. It is reasonable and affordable compared to other products which we considered before choosing this solution for the company.

Unless you are buying a new connector, you won't need to shell out more money for the solution.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

My company had to choose between SailPoint, IdentityIQ, and One Identity Manager. SailPoint IdentityIQ is heavily based on Java, whereas One Identity Manager is based on mostly Windows and PowerShell scripting. Our company is a big Microsoft shop, so it only made sense to go with One Identity Manager.

The simplicity of One Identity Manager is good. That makes it easier to adapt. Sometimes, I wonder why it is not so popular in the US.

There is definitely a learning curve for One Identity Manager. This is true for any solution, including One Identity Manager. However, the time that it takes to learn is different compared to Oracle products, where it takes much more time compared to One Identity Manager.

What other advice do I have?

This solution should be considered by companies (based on their needs).

The biggest lesson learnt: If you are going with One Identity Manager, don't go with Oracle Database on the back-end.

The privileged account governance features have been good. I have actually led the project management for our customer advisory board session where we have looked for connectors for Cosmos DB. Using Graph API, we have been able to do pretty much anything that we want.

We connected SAP through a database.

We have plans to increase usage. It is our corporate-wide solution for identity governance, as of today. Our usage will increase because we plan to digitize the enterprise with mobile and the cloud. We see the need growing for this. That was the reason for my previous comment about having more Azure capabilities with their integration with Cosmos DB.

I would rate this solution as eight out of 10.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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Learn what your peers think about One Identity Manager. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: October 2021.
543,424 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Matt Thomson
Principal Consultant at UNIFY Solutions
Consultant
Top 5Leaderboard
Great security controls with tighter de-provisioning and excellent self-service capabilities

Pros and Cons

  • "The IT shop is a great tool that allows a simple interface for users to see their access, be able to request additional access, and view the workflow approval process to understand where their request is and what any hold-ups may be."
  • "We fell into that trap of over-customization which made upgrading the product difficult."

What is our primary use case?

We used One Identity Management for 15,000 employees of a financial services firm. In addition to the IM functionality, we leveraged One ID for Identity Governance - including access certifications.

We had automated provisioning of users based on HR data. This automatically created 4-5 base accounts and birthright access for users. In addition to that, we leveraged the IT shop to request roles for users which, for the most part, automatically provisioned access to users.

In addition to this, we used the Attestation features of the product to aid in our User Access Reviews.

How has it helped my organization?

There were significant productivity benefits over our previous platform with the increased automation which took the process of onboarding staff down from days to minutes. It allowed user self-service for additional access. The approval process was tracked and auditable.

It also improved our security controls with tighter de-provisioning, where we would automatically terminate a user's access when they left the company. In addition, regular user access certification campaigns were undertaken to review staff access and to ensure staff only had the access required to perform their role.

What is most valuable?

As the team supporting the platform, one of the key features One Identity Manager has that was very valuable was the administration interface which allowed a quick easy overview of staff, their entitlements, and how they had were entitled to access.

Centralizing identity management allowed for a centralized governance model. 

The IT shop is a great tool that allows a simple interface for users to see their access, be able to request additional access, and view the workflow approval process to understand where their request is and what any hold-ups may be. 

What needs improvement?

The blessing and curse with One Identity Manager was its flexibility and the ability to solve business problems in a number of ways. We fell into that trap of over-customization which made upgrading the product difficult. An improvement would be to offer guides on how you should set up a base configuration. There should also be integration guides to key systems like Active Directory.

In addition to that, we had some slowness with the IT shop when we had significant amounts of data, users, etc., in the system and there were some slow database queries that needed to be optimized and patched. This caused some slowness when running Attestation campaigns. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I used the solution for over 6 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Overall, the tool was stable. Our issues were mostly around customizations and bad data.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The tool is scalable and can include a number of the usual infrastructure scalability options.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support was good, for the most part, especially when the local support team understood our level of expertise. If we were raising a problem it was a real problem and we were put through to the level 3 support quickly.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We had a previous Identity Management Solution and we swapped it out as the old solution had little investment in its user interface and we needed a better interface for our users to be able to self-service effectively.

How was the initial setup?

It was a complex setup process, however, it was the first time it was done in the country 7 years ago. Getting the product installed was straightforward. It would be important to follow a proper SDLC with requirements being a key initial piece of the puzzle to help you maintain costs.

What about the implementation team?

We used a mix of vendor and in-house resources on the project. Like the in-house resources, the vendor at the time had no prior knowledge of the tool so it was a learning journey for both sets of resources.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

When we started the journey 7+ years ago, there was a limited skill set in the market, and that is still the case today. 

Like all Identity Management projects, setting firm requirements upfront is important to maintain costs.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We did evaluate other options, however, I wasn't involved in that process.

What other advice do I have?

Look to limit customizations where you can; it can be easier to customize the tool in the short term, however, it can result in significant technical debt and effort in the future.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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