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Finto Thomas
Information Security Program Preparer / Architect at Alef Education
Real User
Top 20
Gives our teams visibility into copyright and security risks in our code

Pros and Cons

  • "The value I get from IQ Server is that I get information on real business risks. Is something compliant, are we using the proper license?"
  • "Nexus Lifecycle is multiple products. One drawback I've noticed is that there are some differences in the features between the products within Lifecycle. They need to maintain the same structure, but there are some slight differences."

What is our primary use case?

We are in the education industry, but we are a developer-based company. We heavily use lots of public libraries. We use Sonatype Nexus Lifecycle mainly for protecting us from vulnerabilities and license copyright issues. We heavily depend on its database.

It's a hybrid. We have our on-premises instance for our internal security. With Sonatype itself, we use the cloud service, but we have a few modules on-premises, such as IQ Server and the report server. We have deployed those modules on AWS. As a company, we use cloud services 100 percent.

How has it helped my organization?

We have started rolling out to each of our feature teams and so far we have rolled it out to about 30 percent, but we can already see the benefit. It gives our teams easy visibility into the risk inside our code. "Risk" in this case can be copyright, more along the lines of compliance, and security itself, such as vulnerabilities.

From the legal and security perspectives, we have a huge concern about what we use in our product and our platform. Before using Sonatype we had a huge business risk. Since bringing in Sonatype, we have visibility for both the legal and security teams. It enables us to maintain the quality from the third-party libraries.

We follow the CI/CD methodology and Sonatype's impact is really huge because we are able to meet our continuous integration in the DevOps pipeline. The speed of that flow is noticeable. The impact is on both development and operations, together. The integration with the CI/CD pipeline is easy.

What is most valuable?

From the integration perspective, it is easy to use, out-of-the-box. The GUI is not complex.

I mainly use two modules, the report server and IQ Server. The value I get from IQ Server is that I get information on real business risks. Is something compliant, are we using the proper license?

With IQ Server we are currently running the default policy. We started deploying six months back and our main objectives were identifying any bad licenses in our library or product, and whether we are using any critically vulnerable assets. We have stuck with the default policies and they are giving us huge visibility and, as a result, we are putting a lot of effort into remediation.

In terms of the data quality and the database they have for open source, I'm impressed. For our requirements, the data we get seems to be updated well when it comes to license-type and vulnerabilities.

The solution also blocks undesirable open source components from entering our development lifecycle. We use it for controlling third-party libraries.

What needs improvement?

Nexus Lifecycle is multiple products. One drawback I've noticed is that there are some differences in the features between the products within Lifecycle. They need to maintain the same structure, but there are some slight differences.

Other than that, the tool is very user-friendly and gives the right reports to the right teams.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using Sonatype Nexus Lifecycle for about the last six months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Until now, we haven't faced any challenges on the stability front. If there's a challenge, if something is down, we definitely get a direct alert. We are happy with the stability part. Both the software and the infrastructure are good.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

There are two aspects to the solution's scalability. The infrastructure scalability is the first part, and that is good. The second part is the developer and the licensing front. When we started the program, we had 60 developers but we now have double that number. There's flexibility on both the infra and the licensing. That is good, as of now.

How are customer service and technical support?

When it comes to cultural adoption, when we put something new in the DevOps pipeline, the positive side is that we have a dedicated professional support team and there is a dedicated person. I'm on the security side, I'm not a developer. So the challenge for me is that when I go to the developers, they have a different language. That support person is always there to support me and I'm very happy with that support and the way they handle us as a customer. I can go to the development team or the department and say that, "If we need any support, let me know." I know that dedicated support person will be there for us. That's very much appreciated. That model is actually helping me to push our development teams to get into this new integration. The support model, with a dedicated person, is very useful.

We have frequent meetings with the person who manages the team, and our dedicated support person from Sonatype. If there's a new update it's like we have permanent support. They help us to update.

I would rate their support at nine out of 10.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were using Sonatype open source, the repository server, for a long time, as a free edition and as a PoC. That's why we picked Sonatype Nexus Lifecycle. 

Before that, we were using a different solution for a period of time. We jumped to Sonatype from our previous solution because it had a limitation on the modules. If I go for a multiple module integration, there is additional cost, whereas with Sonatype, they bundle licenses. There's no limitation. I can go for any number of integrations. That's the reason we switched to Sonatype.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was triggered from a template in the cloud, so it was easily set up.

With this implementation, the challenge is awareness. We have 14 development teams, but when we started the program there were 10. The number of development teams continues to increase and they use different tools and techniques in the CI/CD. From my side, in security, the idea is to make them aware. This would be the same whether the product was Sonatype or something else. Making them aware has been a very big challenge for me, to onboard them and make the product effective.

So the initial, technical deployment is easy, but to make it effective, we have had to bring that awareness into focus and do repeated training.

The initial deployment took one or two days, taking into account the infrastructure requirements in AWS. But that's not the issue. We deployed the server, but if nobody's using it there's no value from it. The value comes from being able to integrate all the developers. The dedicated support person was very useful in helping me create that awareness and value from it.

We use a lot of tools in our CI/CD, so the initial month was more of a feasibility test and proof of concept which was validated with multiple scenarios. Then we started onboarding teams, one per month. We work with the Agile methodology in two-week sprints. Each team picked the integration per its own Agile sprint timeline, based on the product owner's priorities. Within the two-week sprint for a given team, we are able to do a full integration for that team. But within those two weeks, if you look at the real effort, it would be a maximum of about two days, including troubleshooting. We have covered 30 to 40 percent of our teams so far. Within the next three to four months we may be able to complete the process and cover 100 percent.

What was our ROI?

When I started with Sonatype six months back, I knew that I wanted to do 10 integrations. When I started integrating with a development team, and getting them more usability, I understood the reality was not 10, it was actually 100. When I ran with another vendor, even though I started with a small price, when I looked at the total cost of ownership or the return on investment, it was totally different. With Sonatype there is definitely a return on investment in the number of integrations and the personal support. In that sense, there has been a lot of value. 

In addition, the bundled licensing is a huge difference and provides flexibility. We are not limited by the number of integrations, like in other products. We have flexibility and scalability. For us, the return of investment or value is huge, when it comes to the licensing model.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Cost is a drawback. It's somewhat costly.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

As part of the procurement process in Alef, we have to do a minimum three-product evaluation. We evaluated Sonatype, a different solution, and there were two more in the pipeline. Based on that evaluation, technical and other, Sonatype came into the picture. 

The competing solution was actually cheaper, no doubt, but when we looked at the overall picture, the total cost of ownership after one year of integration, we understood it would be less with Sonatype, even though the initial price was less with the other products.

If you're going to be scaling and growing quickly, in a way you cannot predict, the Sonatype licensing model and feature set are definitely good.

What other advice do I have?

Look at the scenario of the total cost after one year, not the initial stage. When we looked into the initial stage costs, there were vendors that cost less. But when you come to the integrations and real scenarios, that bill goes up. We had to clearly evaluate, not only the initial moment, but one year or two years down the line and consider the total cost of ownership.

Also, be sure to properly utilize the engineer allocated to your site to help support the developers.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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Russell Webster
VP and Sr. Manager at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
We built it directly into our continuous integration cycles and have been able to catch things at build time

Pros and Cons

  • "The data quality is really good. They've got some of the best in the industry as far as that is concerned. As a result, it helps us to resolve problems faster. The visibility of the data, as well as their features that allow us to query and search - and even use it in the development IDE - allow us to remediate and find things faster."
  • "As far as the relationship of, and ease of finding the relationships between, libraries and applications across the whole enterprise goes, it still does that. They could make that a little smoother, although right now it's still pretty good."

What is our primary use case?

The Lifecycle product is for protection, and licensing vulnerabilities issues, in our build lifecycle.

How has it helped my organization?

Without it we didn't have any way to detect vulnerabilities except through reactive measures. It's allowed us to be proactive in our approach to vulnerability detection.

Sonatype has also brought open-source intelligence and policy enforcement across our SDLC. It enforces the SDLC contributors to only use the proper and allowed libraries at the proper and allowed time in the lifecycle of development. The solution blocks undesirable open-source components from entering our development lifecycle. That's its whole point and it does it very well.

We use the solution to automate open-source governance and minimize risk. With our leaders across our different organizations, we set policies that govern what types of libraries can be used and what types of licenses can be used. We set those as settings in the tool and the tool manages that throughout the lifecycle, automatically.

It's making things more secure, and it's making them higher in quality, and it's helping us to find things earlier. In those situations where we do find an issue, or there is an industry issue later, we have the ability to know its impact rapidly and remediate more rapidly.

What is most valuable?

Its core features are the most valuable:

  • protection
  • scanning
  • detection
  • notification of vulnerabilities.

It's important for us as an enterprise to continually and dynamically protect our software development from threats and vulnerabilities, and to do that as early in the cycle as possible.

Also, the onboarding process is pretty smooth and easy. We didn't feel like it was a huge problem at all. We were able to get in there and have it start scanning pretty rapidly.

The data quality is really good. They've got some of the best in the industry as far as that is concerned. As a result, it helps us to resolve problems faster. The visibility of the data, as well as their features that allow us to query and search - and even use it in the development IDE - allow us to remediate and find things faster.

The solution also integrated well with our existing DevOps tool. That was of critical importance to us. We built it directly into our continuous integration cycles and that's allowed us to catch things at build time, as well as stop vulnerabilities from moving downstream.

What needs improvement?

Overall, it's pretty good. The drill-through and search capabilities are pretty good, they're not horrible. 

As far as the relationship of, and ease of finding the relationships between, libraries and applications across the whole enterprise goes, it still does that. They could make that a little smoother, although right now it's still pretty good. It's taking an eight out of ten and asking it to be a ten.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using Nexus Lifecycle for over a year.
We use the Nexus repository for a long time.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's very stable. We have not had any issues with it.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

They're really good with scalability. We have an implementation that spans production use plus a disaster recovery area. The synchronization between those two and the high-availability are awesome.

We're at 100 or 150 licenses, maybe more. Developers are the main role as well as DevOps. The plan is to use it across every single application where we do development. We have a lot of applications, on the order of 500.

We have plans to expand usage, as far as the user base and the number of teams utilizing it go. 

How are customer service and technical support?

Tech support is really available and very helpful.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not have a solution with this type of capabilities. We had some type of Nexus product but we layered this on top. We didn't have that capability.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. There weren't a lot of manual steps involved. There wasn't a ton of configuration. It has very smart defaults. There's not a high level of subject matter expertise required in the setup of the software. 

As for the decisions that you need to make about your policies, there are smart people out there to give you a lot of industry standards. But there is still a lot of work you need to do to make decisions for your enterprise. It can't do that no matter what it is. What you are going to do with those settings and the findings from those settings, that's the hard part. You have to make decisions about what to do with the data that it provides for you. That's not the setup, per se. That's just getting it to be very meaningful in your enterprise.

Our deployment was an interrupt-driven process because we had other work to do also. It took a few days.

The strategy for deployment was to involve legal, development, info security, and DevOps together - the leadership - to understand the tool's capabilities; to understand the defaults and also to come up with a strategy to manage the outcomes, the findings. That group of leadership had to set those settings and automatically be part of SDLC. Along with that, we had to implement a process that ensured that the findings - the breaks and the vulnerabilities that are found - would be visible. Notifications had to be made so that someone can triage and deal with them.

Deployment and maintenance require half a person. It's a side role because there's nothing to do most of the time. It's something you do occasionally, so we don't have a role dedicated to it.

What about the implementation team?

We deployed it ourselves. We worked with Sonatype a little bit but we didn't need much from them. They were available when we needed them, but it was pretty straightforward.

What was our ROI?

The solution has improved the time it takes us to release secure apps to market. I can't approximate how much, there are too many factors there to consider.

If you find a problem reactively without the tool, there's the remediation cost, versus the savings of finding it in the first place. It would be really hard for me to go back right now and say how many things we found and how often because it's happening very dynamically. Those findings are not anything I can measure right now.

Then there are the things that we found that we might not have remediated. Maybe they were just okay, they weren't high-ranking and they weren't low-ranking errors. Now, we can decide that because we found them really early that we're not going to take that risk. Whereas before, we might've taken the risk - or not even have seen the risk. So it's hard to measure that. 

It's not literally speeding up our release to market. It's helping us avoid reactive costs and maintenance to the cycles after the fact. If an industry vulnerability is found, we get that notification really early.

We have seen a return on our investment. In some cases, where we've needed to find out the footprint of a certain library across our enterprise, we've been able to do that research in seconds or minutes, rather than long, drawn-out processes with people and teams involved to hunt it down through source code and the like.

As far as spinning up councils and people saying, "What's our vulnerability footprint look like?" we've been able to answer those questions much quicker and remediate quicker with other tools. Those things alone will probably pay for it. The safety stuff pays for it on its own too.

We've more recently also been able to leverage it as a solid containers repository solution.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Pricing is decent. It's not horrible. It's middle-of-the-road, as far as our ranking goes. They're a little bit more but that's also because they provide more. They put more manpower and time into their research - the details on their findings and the way they bring those to the surface. They offer some more features that others don't have, so I understand why it's a little bit more.

They were pretty good with us on pricing, working through it.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at Artifactory as well. We went with Sonatype because it is more comprehensive, it's a market leader, has a great feature set, and support is really good. It's a good team and company. They provide much more granular details, as well as assistance in the remediation and understanding of vulnerabilities, than their competition.

What other advice do I have?

In the early stages of planning and design for rolling this out, ensure that you get all of your stakeholders involved; those who will have an input on the policy settings. Also, ensure you have a process and people involved to deal with the findings. Have that baked into your standard enterprise processes. Don't just turn it on and not know what to do with it.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Learn what your peers think about Sonatype Nexus Lifecycle. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2021.
554,586 professionals have used our research since 2012.
FT
IT Security Manager at a insurance company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Top 10
Its data helps us with fixing/understanding an issue more quickly

Pros and Cons

  • "The key feature for Nexus Lifecycle is the proprietary data they have on vulnerabilities. The way that they combine all the different sources and also their own research into one concise article that clearly explains what the problem is. Most of the time, and even if you do notice that you have a problem, the public information available is pretty weak. So, if we want to assess if a problem applies to our product, it's really hard. We need to invest a lot of time digging into the problem. This work is basically done by Sonatype for us. The data that it delivers helps us with fixing or understanding the issue a lot quicker than without it."
  • "The GUI is simple, so it's easy to use. It started as great to use, but for larger scale companies, it also comes with some limitations. This is why we tried to move to more of an API approach. So, the GUI could use some improvements potentially."

What is our primary use case?

At the moment, we are primarily targeting security vulnerabilities, and only those with high severity. 

We have it configured not to block anything at this stage. We only aim for visibility at the moment. We might eventually start blocking or failing builds, but right now, we only want to have visibility.

We are still pretty early in our adoption phase. We are onboarding new applications much quicker than we are remediating issues in the existing ones.

How has it helped my organization?

For the application onboarding, we are focusing on automating that as much as possible. Considering the amount of applications that we scan, it's probably not feasible to do all that within the GUI, but the APIs provided by the solution are really good. We have some positive impressions for that. The automatic onboarding seems to work quite well.

One thing we recently did is we automatically onboarded every application that we deployed to production. We scanned each one of them and now have a complete picture of our estates. Every single vulnerability introduced from an open source component is now visible, and we have a clear number. That number was big. Really, we have a lot of issues which we were unaware of. We suspected that we had them, but we now have a clear number that makes selling the solution internally a lot easier.

The solution brought open source intelligence and policy enforcement to a small extent across our SDLC (software development lifecycle) because we have only fully rolled it out in a small number of teams. However, where we did do this, we have started scanning right at the built face, seeing issues really early in the lifecycle.

The solution automates open source governance and minimizes risk. We are trying to reduce the amount of vulnerabilities that we introduce using open source codes. The entire goal of why we're doing this solution is to have it in the lifecycle of our software development and reduce risk.

What is most valuable?

The key feature for Nexus Lifecycle is the proprietary data they have on vulnerabilities. The way that they combine all the different sources and also their own research into one concise article that clearly explains what the problem is. Most of the time, and even if you do notice that you have a problem, the public information available is pretty weak. So, if we want to assess if a problem applies to our product, it's really hard. We need to invest a lot of time digging into the problem. This work is basically done by Sonatype for us. The data that it delivers helps us with fixing or understanding the issue a lot quicker than without it.

The solution integrates well with our existing DevOps tools. We have a few different ways of integrating it. The primary point is the Jenkins plugin to integrate it into the pipeline, but we also use the API to feed applications from our self-developed systems. So, the Sonatype API is very valuable to us as well. We've also experimented with IDE plugins and some other features that all look very promising.

What needs improvement?

The GUI is simple, so it's easy to use. It started as great to use, but for larger scale companies, it also comes with some limitations. This is why we tried to move to more of an API approach. So, the GUI could use some improvements potentially.

Something else that's a bit lacking is most of our components are not explicitly included but are transitive dependencies. We have 50 applications that all report security issues, but they all come from one central library that we built ourselves, which is also scanned by Lifecycle. So, we have 51 components, and we are not seeing that only one of them is really the one we should be targeting. What would be really great in the solution would be some dependency graphing, or at least collecting the transitive dependencies. That would help for larger scale implementations.

The Success Metrics report is really focused on very specific numbers that are not interesting to us. They are for when you are much further along in the onboarding process. There is an API which allows you to retrieve the data on which the Success Metrics are based. We use this API to create our own charts, reflecting what we're looking for.

For how long have I used the solution?

My company started its POC about two years ago. 

I only started at the company in September last year, so my experience only accounts for the last four months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I think we have had zero downtime since I have been here. I didn't hear that there ever was an issue before, so it's been absolutely great.

Part of the deployment and maintenance is done by me. Upgrading the solution to a new level has only been done by one single person in the past, who spent three to four hours per upgrade on it. It's really low maintenance for us.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have had absolutely no issues with scalability. We built it for a small PoC. We have now scaled it to scan our entire application landscape on the exact same hardware that it was sized on at the beginning and we have had zero issues. So, it's absolutely great.

The solution is only very limited in its current usage. Our current adoption rate is 10 percent. We plan to hopefully introduce it into every application that we build in a language that is supported by Nexus.

At the moment, we have 20 licensed users. These are primarily IT security managers (such as myself), developers, and product owners.

How are customer service and technical support?

This technical support is very good and extremely quick. I have had two or three support cases and none of them took longer than a day to get a response. Sometimes, they respond, "No, the solution cannot do that. We have built it in that way and you need to raise a product improvement requests." So, it's not always what you hope to receive, but at least the answer is always clear and quick.

Most of the time, the data quality is very good. We have had some cases where there were some weird results or errors in it. But, when I contacted support, most of the time they managed to fix it or explain why it wasn't displayed in the way I was expecting.

How was the initial setup?

The central IT service organization in our firm manages all our Linux setups and stuff like that. He primarily repackages the installer into an RPM for our Linux service. Usually, the upgrade is just totally painless and right off the books.

What was our ROI?

ROI on a security product is always hard to argue because you never know how expensive a security issue could become.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The price is good. We certainly get a lot more in return. However, it's also hard to get the funds to roll out such a product for the entire firm. Therefore, pricing has been a limiting factor for us. However, it's a fair price, and I'm confident that we can sell this story appropriately.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I think OWASP Dependency-Check was evaluated before Nexus Lifecycle.

Nexus Lifecycle was chosen primarily for the quality of its scan results.

What other advice do I have?

Look into the API early. Try to scan as much as possible to get an impression of your landscape before you start rolling it out, then you can easily target the teams and applications mostly needed.

The solution makes it easier for us to deploy secure applications. On the other hand, it also introduces a new something that developers didn't really care about before. In some cases, it increases time to market, but for very good reasons. We produce more quality products.

If you consider that developers would test their own research in the past, then their productivity should increase. Unfortunately, most of the time, the hygiene of open source components is a new topic. This is basically new work that we are introducing, so it's hard to compare it to something that wasn't properly done before.

I would rate the solution as an eight (out of 10).

We haven't used the grandfathering feature.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
MA
Computer Architecture Specialist at a energy/utilities company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 10
Before using Lifecycle we were almost blind to the vulnerabilities in open source libraries

Pros and Cons

  • "The scanning capability is its most valuable feature, discovering vulnerable open source libraries."
  • "The reporting capability is good but I wish it was better. I sent the request to support and they raised it as an enhancement within the system. An example is filtering by version. If I have a framework that is used in all applications, but version 1 is used in 50 percent of them and version 2 in 25 percent, they will show as different libraries with different usage. But in reality, they're all using one framework."

What is our primary use case?

We use it to scan applications for open source libraries and to find libraries with a clean version for developers. If one version is vulnerable, they can switch to another version which is clean.

Our situation is that we are running it as a pilot. Hopefully, this year we will be moving the environment into production. Delays happened due to some of our workforce being allocated to different organizations, and then we had the pandemic.

It's deployed on-premise, on a virtual host.

How has it helped my organization?

We can automate the pipeline of CI/CD. For example, if a publication uses an open source library and it's vulnerable, then the security team will mark it in the Lifecycle suite and it can go through the pipeline without manual interaction by the developer.

I'm not a security guy but I have sat with the security team. Once you set the policies, you wont need to change them. The policies wouldn't change that frequently. It covers the needs that we have.

Using the solution we have been able to clean our environment, providing more protection for our applications. We have a more hygienic environment than before. Before using Lifecycle we were almost blind to whatever we had and didn't look into the vulnerabilities within open source libraries. Now we do.

It has helped to increase our productivity a lot, especially with Nexus Repository Manager. It is way more agile. There is no comparison between our productivity before and now.

In terms of the accuracy of the data from Sonatype, at first the teams were challenging whatever the solution provided, but they then verified with the vendor of the open source libraries or via the related community, and they realized that the data from Sonatype is something that is done carefully. It's accurate and valid data. We are now introducing a security layer for open source. Before, there was no security on open source and they did whatever they wanted but that is no longer the case. They have to fix things before deploying them. It helps them resolve issues. It works most of the time, but sometimes there are challenges for the developer in solving them.

We also use the solution to automate open source governance and minimize risk with policies. Some of our developers, although not all of them, have their own Jenkins installed and they set rules and policies. They have integrated Jenkins with Lifecycle and, whenever they push into production, it verifies they are not violating any policies. Once everything is smooth, it goes into production. We haven't formalized that process yet.

What is most valuable?

It's a great tool. We have it connected live to the Sonatype database. Whenever there is a new vulnerability, it's discovered. We have early detection of any vulnerability in our open source library. The scanning capability is its most valuable feature, discovering vulnerable open source libraries.

What needs improvement?

The reporting capability is good but I wish it was better. I sent the request to support and they raised it as an enhancement within the system. An example is filtering by version. If I have a framework that is used in all applications, but version 1 is used in 50 percent of them and version 2 in 25 percent, they will show as different libraries with different usage. But in reality, they're all using one framework.

For how long have I used the solution?

This is my second year using Sonatype Nexus Lifecycle.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's very stable. I don't recall ever seeing problems. The main concern would be data-disk corruption, but I haven't seen it, even though the server, due to patching, has been rebooted multiple times.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

When it comes to scalability, there's a limitation in terms of high-availability. Sonatype recommends you go with high-availability. However, you have to have an Active-Passive solution and we don't use a separate installation for each organization. I know there are ways you can install multiple instances for each organization and proxy between them. Because we are a single organization that uses one installation, we have to set it to Active-Passive and manually switch the Passive on and off.

How are customer service and technical support?

My experience with their technical support has been good, overall.

The problem for us is that we work in a different time zone than they do and the workdays are different. We don't work on Friday and Saturday. If we send them something on Sunday, we don't hear until on Monday. If it is urgent they get back to us.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We used OWASP Dependency-Check, but for only about five months. It needs maintenance. You have to maintain the database library manually, and install it on the developers' workstations. There are a lot of drawbacks with that solution.

If we depend on OWASP Dependency-Check, it is a public vulnerability tool and it is not a good database, to be honest. If you have a library where one version is marked as vulnerable and you go to the community, the owner of the library says all versions are vulnerable. You would not see the vulnerability reflected regarding the versions. You would see it on one version and the others would be marked as clean. The team at Sonatype is doing a good job of maintaining this information very well.

We were working with Repository Manager and the security team switched to a Nexus server to reduce the effort and eliminate duplication. We now also have one, unified solution to cover all the possibilities.

How was the initial setup?

The installation is straightforward in terms of the application itself. However, with our setup, with our environment and the restrictions we have, we had to do a lot of things. But that work was from our side, not from the application's side. 

We did the installation within about two to three days. I was part of our support team at that time. Later on, I added enhancements on-the-go, such as certification. If I were to do the installation now, I would do it within an hour. It is the configuration that you have to get to know. Once you know it, that's it. When it's new to you, you have to take the time to read the documentation to understand what's going on and do things right.

What about the implementation team?

I only worked with the support from Sonatype and I was the only person in our organization involved in the installation. I am also the only one who runs this part of our environment, in terms of maintenance.

What was our ROI?

We expect to see ROI once we're using it fully in production.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Lifecycle, to the best of my recollection, had the best pricing compared with other solutions.

What other advice do I have?

We ran into too many debates and there was this culture of "security is not mine" and someone else should have to deal with it. After using the solution, they realized this is not the case. Security vulnerabilities had to be addressed. I was a developer and I understood their complaints, but security is important and you have to go with it. The tool is there to automate and simplify your work and you should utilize it. It has been a very good experience.

We are introducing Lifecycle and developers will be aware, with the IDE plugin, from the beginning, whether whatever libraries they are using are vulnerable or not. There should be no delays if they work with it from the beginning.

It is used, or should be used, by all of our 120 developers. But in a group developing a given application, not everyone would commit to it and scan the application. One would do the scanning. But, overall, all of them should be directly or indirectly using it or depending on it.

When we move it to production we will need to do a recertification of the users and find out who is not using it, who would use it, and who is shifting to other organizations. Then we will decide on the number.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Wes Kanazawa
Sr. DevOps Engineer at Primerica
Real User
Top 5
Enables our developers to proactively select components that don't have a vulnerability or a licensing issue

Pros and Cons

  • "The proxy repository is probably the most valuable feature to us because it allows us to be more proactive in our builds. We're no longer tied to saving components to our repository."
  • "It would be helpful if it had a more detailed view of what has been quarantined, for people who don't have Lifecycle licenses. Other than that, it's pretty good."

What is our primary use case?

We're using it to change the way we do our open-source. We used to actually save our open-source and now we're moving towards a firewall approach where we are proxy to Maven repos or NPM repos, and we are using those proxies so that we can keep ourselves from pulling in known bad components at build time. We're able to be more proactive on our builds.

How has it helped my organization?

It's allowed our developers, instead of waiting till the last minute before a release, to know well ahead of time that the components are bad and they are able to proactively select different components that don't have a vulnerability or a licensing issue.

Also, the solution's data quality seems to be good. We haven't had any issues. We're definitely able to solve problems a lot faster and get answers to the developers a lot faster.

And Nexus Lifecycle integrates well with your existing DevOps tools. We were able to put it right into our build pipelines. We use Jenkins and we're able to stop the builds right in the actual build process whenever there's a quarantined item.

In addition, it has brought open-source intelligence and policy enforcement across our SDLC. It has totally changed the way we do our process. We have been able to speed up the approval process of OSS. Given the policies, we're able to say, "These are okay to use." We've been able to put in guardrails to allow development to move faster using the product. Our pipelines are automated and it is definitely a key component of our automation.

Finally, the developers like it because they're able to see and fix their issues right away. That has improved. For example, let's say a developer had to come to us and said, "Hey, scan this. I want to use it," and we scan it and it has a vulnerability. They've already asked us to do something that they could have done through the firewall product or Lifecycle. Suppose it takes us a day and then we turn around and say, "Okay, here are the results," and we say they can use this version of that product. They've got to download it and see if it works. So we're already saving a day there. But then let's say they have to send it off to security to get approval on something that security would probably approve anyways. It's just they didn't know security would approve it. They would have to wait two or three days for security to come back and give them an answer. So we're looking at possibly saving four days on a piece of code.

What is most valuable?

The proxy repository is probably the most valuable feature to us because it allows us to be more proactive in our builds. We're no longer tied to saving components to our repository.

The default policies are good, they're a good start. They're a great place to start when you are looking to build your own policies. We mostly use the default policies, perhaps with changes here and there. It's deceptively easy to understand. It definitely provides the flexibility we need. There's a lot more stuff that you can get into. It definitely requires training to properly use the policies.

We like the integrations into developer tooling. We use the Lifecycle piece for some of our developers and it integrates easily into Eclipse and into Visual Studio code. It's a good product for that.

What needs improvement?

It would be helpful if it had a more detailed view of what has been quarantined, for people who don't have Lifecycle licenses. Other than that, it's pretty good.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using it for about a year now.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability has been great. We haven't had any issues in the year that we've had it running. So far, so good.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's probably not that scalable in its current state. That has to do with the way that the applications are designed. I think they're working on that when they start working on the HA solutions. For Nexus and Nexus IQ I think that will change. But right now, it's not very scalable.

How are customer service and technical support?

Sonatype's technical support for this solution has been great. They answer my questions, even my stupid questions. I might be asking them, "Hey, how do I do this? I can't find it." and they'll say "Oh, it's just this button right here." They never make me feel too bad about it.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We didn't have something that does what a firewall does. We used a different repository and used Nexus IQ to do the enforcement of policies by scanning OSS's individually. It's nice having it happen automatically on the repositories now.

How was the initial setup?

The directions on the site are good. Once you follow those, you're good. But if you're looking to set it up by just clicking around, you will probably have a hard time figuring it out. But it's easy once you know what you're doing.

From inserting the license file to proxying my first repos, it took about an hour, at the most.

We were doing a conversion. So the implementation strategy, if we're just talking about firewall, was that we already had Nexus. We bought Nexus and the firewall at the same time. Once Nexus was installed and set up, it was a matter of importing our repositories from Artifactory Pro and then connecting the proxy repositories. I can't say there was any "super-strategy." It was just turning it on, getting it going, and then moving the developers over to it using their settings, XML, etc. And we had to set our NPM RC files to point to our new repository using the firewall and, for those repositories that have a firewall, they had to be turned on with them.

What about the implementation team?

We did it ourselves.

What was our ROI?

We don't have any evidence that the solution improves the time it takes us to release secure apps to market because we haven't released an app yet, but I'm sure it will.

Just the dev happiness is already a type of ROI, in addition to how fast they're able to go using it.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We pay yearly.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I looked at a few others, like Black Duck, and I was not impressed by them. I didn't get a chance to actually use Black Duck but everything I read said that Black Duck came up with more false positives than Sonatype.

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to use it as soon as you can. Get it implemented into your environment as quickly as you can because it's going to help. Once you get it, get your devs on it because they're going to thank you for it.

All of our development is happening using the firewall. All our build pipelines are going through there. As far as licensed users go who can look at Nexus, we've got about 35. They range from devs to security personnel to DevOps people.

All our applications are moving over to it, so that's definitely going to increase the usage. We've got about another 200 applications on the board that will come into our greenfield process so they will be pulled straight into that repository using the firewall. It's definitely going to keep growing.

For deployment and maintenance of this solution there is really just our DevOps team of about four people, but I'm primarily responsible.

I would rate it a 10 out of 10. It does everything I need it to do.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Andy Cox
Product Strategy Group Director at Civica
Real User
Top 5
Helps our developers be aware of duplicate components in their code, but .NET open-source licensing recognition needs work

Pros and Cons

  • "For us, it's seeing not only the licensing and security vulnerabilities but also seeing the age of the open-sources included within our software. That allows us to take proactive steps to make sure we're updating the software to versions that are regularly maintained and that don't have any vulnerabilities."
  • "We use Azure DevOps as our application lifecycle management tool. It doesn't integrate with that as well as it does with other tools at the moment, but I think there's work being done to address that. In terms of IDEs, it integrates well. We would like to integrate it into our Azure cloud deployment but the integration with Azure Active Directory isn't quite as slick as we would like it to be. We have to do some workarounds for that at the moment."

What is our primary use case?

We have two use cases. We're predominantly a products company and we scan our products, in a controlled way, to make sure they're not using open-source software. We want to make sure that we're licensed correctly for our products and the way they are deployed. There are also security reasons for making sure that our products aren't introducing vulnerabilities and, if they are, that we can address them. 

And part of our business is that we build bespoke software. Some of our customers want to make sure that the open-source software is being used correctly in the software we build for them. And, again, we want to protect that software against security vulnerabilities that might be introduced by open-source software.

We also use the solution to help with open-source governance and minimize risk. When we are acquiring a new company, for example, we will automatically, as part of the due diligence on that purchase, scan their products to make sure they don't have vulnerabilities that we are not prepared to accept. So it helps us to make sure, before we make any purchase, that the target acquisition is of suitable quality, in terms of its open-source use.

How has it helped my organization?

The solution has improved the way our company functions in terms of the way that developers think about the components that are being built into their products, making sure they're not being duplicated, for example. The developers now understand that there's a cost associated with including open-source. It may not have a licensing fee, but there is a cost associated with it. That sort of education piece has had a big influence.

It has also brought open-source intelligence and policy enforcement across our SDLC. As the teams are setting up their development environments, we have now gotten them to build Sonatype into their development pipeline. They scan their codebase so they actually catch things at the point that they introduce new, open-source software into the products, to make sure they're not actually introducing vulnerabilities or licensing-policy breaches.

Sonatype has also reduced our risk in releasing secure apps to market. Previously, teams would just release without knowing what risks it was exposed to. Now, we can actually do a better risk assessment.

What is most valuable?

For us, it's seeing not only the licensing and security vulnerabilities but also seeing the age of the open-sources included within our software. That allows us to take proactive steps to make sure we're updating the software to versions that are regularly maintained and that don't have any vulnerabilities.

In addition, the default policies, in general, are quite good. We have adjusted slightly but we're fairly happy with the way that's set up. They provide us with the flexibility we're looking for.

The data quality is pretty good. We don't have masses of false positives. There have been some areas around .NET which haven't been quite as good as some of the other areas, but we know work is being done on that. Overall, the data quality does help us solve problems faster.

What needs improvement?

We use Azure DevOps as our application lifecycle management tool. It doesn't integrate with that as well as it does with other tools at the moment, but I think there's work being done to address that. In terms of IDEs, it integrates well. We would like to integrate it into our Azure cloud deployment but the integration with Azure Active Directory isn't quite as slick as we would like it to be. We have to do some workarounds for that at the moment.

Also, the ability of the solution to recognize more of the .NET components would be helpful for us.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using Sonatype for about six years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's a stable product, especially compared to some of its competitors.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support is generally good. A couple of years ago there were some things that had been logged and that had to be chased a few times. They didn't go as quickly as we'd have liked. But recently, things have been better and they have been more timely in their responses.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Our company tried with Black Duck, but that was it.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward. One of my team members was able to execute it quite quickly without too much trouble or additional help.

It's deployed internally at the moment but, moving forward, we want to move it to a cloud-based deployment.

What was our ROI?

We have seen return on our investment, but it's a difficult one to quantify because, unless you have a problem, it's like any sort of security or testing; it's difficult to quantify unless you have an issue. In terms of protecting our IP it certainly has provided ROI and, in security issues as well, it has helped us to identify them, reducing our risk. There has been a big risk reduction for us.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We pay on a yearly basis.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We do a supplier selection every couple of years. One solution that we've evaluated is Black Duck, for example, but it didn't seem to be as stable as the Sonatype solution, when we last tested it.

WhiteSource is another one we tested. It's a cloud-hosted solution so I can't comment on its stability.

Comparing these solutions with Sonatype, the information that comes with Sonatype and its recognition are good. The fact that WhiteSource is cloud-hosted is nice and it's an advantage you don't immediately get with Sonatype. But with WhiteSource we got more false positives than we did with other tools. And Black Duck, when we've last reviewed it, wasn't as comprehensive as what we are looking for.

Sonatype met our needs, what we were looking for, particularly around protection of IP. The knowledge of the Sonatype team, and our good working relationship with them, have helped us to continue to use the product. The fact that they take some of our feedback and incorporate it into the product has also helped.

What other advice do I have?

I would definitely recommend understanding what you're trying to achieve. For us it's quite clear that we want, for the moment, to protect our IP and to identify security vulnerabilities. If the understanding is that you want to protect against open-source from coming into your products in the first place, or you're doing greenfield development, look at the right product stack from Sonatype to make sure that you're choosing the right set of products. We've got a mature product base that we're working with. If you're starting from scratch, you would want to assess what you're trying to get out of your policies and processes around this, and make sure that the products match.

We have about 150 users of Sonatype in our company, and their roles range from managers who review the open-source solutions to make sure they're being licensed properly in the product, to developers who are actually cutting the code. It's also service and project managers looking at their exposure, or maybe the audit team that wants to make sure that there's compliance within the different teams. For deployment of the solution and maintenance we have one person, a junior software engineer.

Sonatype is being used for regular scans on our priority projects, numbering about 20. We plan to eventually get that rolled out much more of our estate, to 50 or 60 business units.

I would rate it at seven out of 10. Some of the scanning around the .NET open-source licensing, the recognition; and the integration with some of our development tools, like Azure DevOps, are where, perhaps, it's lacking.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
IV
Product Owner Secure Coding at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 20
Improves the overall hygiene of the source code and is helpful for code security and remediation of issues

Pros and Cons

  • "The quality or the profiles that you can set are most valuable. The remediation of issues that you can do and how the information is offered is also valuable."
  • "The user interface needs to be improved. It is slow for us. We use Nexus IQ mostly via APIs. We don't use the interface that much, but when we use it, certain areas are just unresponsive or very slow to load. So, performance-wise, the UI is not fast enough for us, but we don't use it that much anyway."

What is our primary use case?

We use it in the pipeline. So, software development is done in a pipeline in automated steps. One of those steps is Quality Assurance for which we use, amongst others, Sonatype, and this is done automatically. Based upon the outcome of this scan, the software product can proceed to the next step, or its blocks need to be rebuilt with updates.

We are using Nexus IQ Server 114, and we're about to upgrade to 122.

How has it helped my organization?

It improves the overall hygiene of the source code. We have a lot of scans going on every day. They are in the thousands. If high critical vulnerabilities are detected, of course, that is good. It is already proving its value to us down the line because these vulnerabilities do not reach production.

Data quality helps us solve problems faster. We get the info on what's vulnerable, and most of the time, we get advice for an upgraded version that can be implemented right away. That's very valuable.

It brought open-source intelligence and policy enforcement across our SDLC. It is the tool that we use for open-source scanning and third-party dependency scanning. So, it brings a lot of value to us from that perspective. 50% of the code that we use is open-source. So, it is important to scan it for all kinds of vulnerabilities. It is very powerful, and it brings a lot of security to us. It can block undesirable open-source components from entering our development life-cycle.

It secures the software supply chain because it scans the packages that we get from our vendors, but we don't use it to secure our pipelines or steps in the build process. The build process itself is not secured by Nexus IQ.

It improves the overall health and security of the software supply chain. Anything that is detected can be blocked.

What is most valuable?

The quality or the profiles that you can set are most valuable. The remediation of issues that you can do and how the information is offered is also valuable.

Its integration with our tool landscape is very valuable. It is the interaction with account management and technical consultants.

The default policies and the policy engine are very good. Most of what we have is the default. It is also possible to create your own policies and custom rules, but we only do that for a handful of exceptions. We are very pleased with the default policies and settings. It provides us the flexibility we need because we can use it in our own customized settings. It is flexible enough for us to work with.

What needs improvement?

The user interface needs to be improved. It is slow for us. We use Nexus IQ mostly via APIs. We don't use the interface that much, but when we use it, certain areas are just unresponsive or very slow to load. So, performance-wise, the UI is not fast enough for us, but we don't use it that much anyway.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for about five years. It was being used prior to me engaging with it. So, it was already there.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is very stable. There are no complaints. It is good in terms of availability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We don't need to scale it. At this moment, it is right-sized for us. So, I don't see any scalability going on right now. We do self-hosting on our own internal platform. The resources that are available are not scalable, so to say. They are right-sized.

We have between 750 and 1,250 users. The developers are the biggest part. We also have our operations support team that deals with upgrades, patch management, installation, and the Infra stuff. There are about 10 people. They don't only work on Nexus IQ, of course, but that's part of their job. There is also the security team, which is my team. It has about 10 people. We use Nexus IQ for all kinds of security review activities. We also have five metrics people who use these tools to gather metrics. They also use Nexus IQ.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have contacted them, and I would rate them a seven out of 10. Like every big company that you contact for support, you can get people who are well aware of your situation or less aware. Depending on who you get at the support desk, you might get immediate feedback or the right answer, or you might be going back and forth to get the right information. You don't have a single contact person for all your support, so the quality can change based on who you talk to.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Our company didn't use any other solution.

How was the initial setup?

We have a team of about 10 people for upgrading the tool, patching the tool, migrating XIQ from our own platform to a public cloud platform, and creating system rules and policies.

What was our ROI?

For Nexus IQ, I have not seen any research that has been done for ROI. I am aware of other tools but not Nexus IQ.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

There are additional costs in commercial offerings for add-ons such as Nexus Container or IDE Advanced Toolkit. They come with additional fees or licenses. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We always explore other tools. For every tool that we have, we constantly look at what's available. Every couple of years, we do an evaluation to see if there are replacements that are better suited to our needs. Our requirements might change over time. Our entire circumstance might also change from being on-premise to a fully-cloud company, where we might need to fulfill different types of needs. So, of course, we explore what are the best options for us. We stayed with Nexus IQ because they're a pleasant company to work with, and they offer a good product. 

What other advice do I have?

I would advise making sure that your developers are aware of why you are going to scan the source codes for vulnerabilities. An awareness training or awareness program on open-source vulnerabilities goes hand in hand with implementing such a tool because the tool is there to enforce policies, etc. If your community developer knows how to build secure software and how to look at open-source, it will drastically reduce the findings in the tool and create a healthy software landscape. So, awareness of secure coding principles should accompany the installation of such a tool.

Although we are very familiar with the concepts and the topics, we don't make use of integration with IDEs. We do not support automated pull requests yet. It would take time for us to implement, and there are other things that we are busy with. It would depend on how things proceed. We also don't use Nexus Container. 

It has not improved the time to release secure apps to market. It has also not increased developer productivity. In the short term, it decreases developer productivity because they have to fix stuff that otherwise would go undetected. So, productivity is hampered if you are confronted with vulnerabilities that you need to fix. Therefore, being more secure in the short term doesn't make you more productive. If you are aware of why you need to look at certain things, it can bring productivity in the long term.

The biggest lesson that we have learned from using Nexus IQ is that with open-source, so many things can go wrong. Most of the vulnerabilities that you have in your software are due to the bad usage of open-source components.

I would rate this solution an eight out of 10.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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RH
Application Development Manager at a financial services firm with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
If new libraries need to be used, we can scan them to see if they are secure or valid

Pros and Cons

  • "The report part is quite easy to read. The report part is very important to us because that is how we communicate to our security officer and the security committee. Therefore, we need to have a complete report that we can generate and pass onto them for review."
  • "One thing that I would like to give feedback on is to scan the binary code. It's very difficult to find. It's under organization and policies where there are action buttons that are not very obvious. I think for people who are using it and are not integrated into it, it is not easy to find the button to load the binary and do the scan. This is if there is no existing, continuous integration process, which I believe most people have, but some users don't have this at the moment. This is the most important function of the Nexus IQ, so I expect it should be right on the dashboard where you can apply your binary and do a quick scan. Right now, it's hidden inside organization and policies. If you select the organization, then you can see in the top corner that there is a manual action which you can approve. There are multiple steps to reach that important function that we need. When we were initially looking at the dashboard, we looked for it and couldn't find it. So, we called our coworker who set up the server and they told us it's not on the dashboard."

What is our primary use case?

During the development, if there are new libraries that need to be used, then we scan them first to see if they are secure or valid. If there is a threat, can we avoid it or use alternatives. Also, before each release, it is mandatory for us to scan the code before we go to release it.   

It was installed at the beginning of the year, so I think we are using the latest version.

How has it helped my organization?

We rely on the default policies because we are new to the system. We haven't adjusted any policies and are sticking with whatever policies were shipped to us. We are mostly focused on policies 9 and 10 for the highest threat levels. These are the ones which we are focusing right now. We don't want to make any modifications or adjustments in terms of 9 or 10. Mostly, it will be the security officer's decision if we need to update the policies. I'm the manager of the development team and my developers usually will not make any changes in terms of policies.

It provides a very detailed analysis of our library. Then, when some of the scans identify a licensing issue, we look at them and know if we have the license. It sort of scans everything. Without this tool, I don't think that there's even a capability to go through all these libraries, because some of the libraries were introduced by contractors and a developer who no longer works here anymore. When Nexus comes in with its scans, it reports on licensing or other vulnerabilities. This is easier to do instead of asking around.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the scanning part, then the report part, as it is quite easy to read. The report part is very important to us because that is how we communicate to our security officer and the security committee. Therefore, we need to have a complete report that we can generate and pass onto them for review.

The solution’s data quality has been pretty accurate. The ones that we are focusing on now are 9 and 10. Once we adjust and scan them again, they are no longer deemed to be the same threat level, which is good. If I replaced the library with a safer one, they still complain that that's not good. So far, we're pretty happy with the quality.

What needs improvement?

One thing that I would like to give feedback on is to scan the binary code. It's very difficult to find. It's under organization and policies where there are action buttons that are not very obvious. I think for people who are using it and are not integrated into it, it is not easy to find the button to load the binary and do the scan. This is if there is no existing, continuous integration process, which I believe most people have, but some users don't have this at the moment. This is the most important function of the Nexus IQ, so I expect it should be right on the dashboard where you can apply your binary and do a quick scan. Right now, it's hidden inside organization and policies. If you select the organization, then you can see in the top corner that there is a manual action which you can approve. There are multiple steps to reach that important function that we need. When we were initially looking at the dashboard, we looked for it and couldn't find it. So, we called our coworker who set up the server and they told us it's not on the dashboard. This comes down to usability. 

There is another usability thing in the reports section. When the PDF gets generated, it is different from the web version. There are some components from some areas which only reside inside the PDF version. When I generate the PDF for my boss to review, she comes back with a question that I didn't even see. I see on the reporting page whatever the PDF will be generating. The PDF is actually generating more information than the web version. That caught me off guard because she forwarded this to the security officer, who is asking, "Why is this? Or, why is that?" But, she has no idea. I didn't have anything handy because I saw the PDF version, which should be same as what I see on the web. This is a bit misrepresented. I would like these versions to speak together and be consistent. Printing a PDF report should generally reflect whatever you have on the page.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using it for two or three months now.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is stable.

Users of the solution include our security officer, our application architect, and me. I manage all of the development and the developers who work on upgrading libraries.

Not many people are needed to maintain this solution. We need two or three people. One person is from our service support where the Sonatype Server is deployed and managed. Another person is the application architect who reviews the libraries.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability is not applicable to us at the moment.

The solution is pretty much involved in every release that we have. So, it's quite frequently being used. We don't have current plans to increase usage. We are working on our continuous integration process. Once that's done, then there will be a need to increase usage.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't opened a support ticket yet.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not have another solution that we previously used before Sonatype.

We had one job file we used a long time ago (it was over 10 years ago). At that time, we had purchased a license, but nobody has really used it for a really long time.

How was the initial setup?

I wasn't involved in the initial setup.

What about the implementation team?

This was all done by our service support.

What was our ROI?

This solution has increased developer productivity by 20 percent. They know the version that they need to use. It is a lot easier.

What other advice do I have?

We are still in the process of automating our deployment.

In terms of the developing the IDE, I don't see a big need because we are mostly focusing on enhancing existing projects. We mostly will be focusing on addressing existing issues and vulnerabilities. For a developer to use a new library all the time, this is not a high priority. Right now, we are working on continuous integration continuous deployment solutions. Then, we will integrate the Sonatype Scanner as part of the build, testing, and release.

I would give it an eight (out of 10). Right now, it is sufficient for us to identify our vulnerabilities. It is quite easy to use and not too much trouble.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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