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TeamViewer OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

TeamViewer is #1 ranked solution in top Virtual Meetings tools and top Remote Access tools. IT Central Station users give TeamViewer an average rating of 10 out of 10. TeamViewer is most commonly compared to TeamViewer Tensor:TeamViewer vs TeamViewer Tensor. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a comms service provider, accounting for 24% of all views.
What is TeamViewer?

TeamViewer lets you connect to any PC or server around the world within a few seconds. Remote control a partners PC as if you were sitting in front of it. Available in over 30 languages, TeamViewer is one of the world's most popular providers of remote control and online meeting software. airbackup, a powerful cloud-based backup solution, and ITbrain, a valuable remote monitoring and IT asset tracking solution, complement TeamViewer's product portfolio.

TeamViewer Buyer's Guide

Download the TeamViewer Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2021

TeamViewer Customers

Porsche Informatik, Philips, DHL, Intel, Motorola, Microsoft, IBM, Siemens, Fujitsu, American Red Cross

TeamViewer Video

Pricing Advice

What users are saying about TeamViewer pricing:
  • "TeamViewer is $600 or $700 per port per year..."
  • "The cost is in the thousands of dollars per year."
  • "We have a corporate license. The maximum amount number of users changes based on the amount you pay. E.g., with our license, there is a maximum amount of users who can use the solution at the same time (10 users)."
  • "We have an annual subscription that is just under $1,900 with no additional costs. We get these promotions about upgrades and stuff like that, but we haven't had a need to add more seats. Users can also use TeamViewer for home use with a non-commercial free license."
  • "It does what I need it to do but I think it's expensive. It wasn't easy for me to get approval from the company to get it... It's costing us about $700 a year, per license."
  • "TeamViewer was willing to give us a one-year package. Whereas, a lot of the other companies that we explored were paid by the month or quarter. It's just easier for our finance people at the college if we can make a one-time yearly payment."
  • "TeamViewer has multiple licensing options."
  • "The price was cheaper than what we were previously paying. At the time that we went with TeamViewer, we were using ShareConnect. The TeamViewer package was about half the cost and able to have a bigger number of users."

TeamViewer Reviews

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JeffreyUrdan
CFO/COO at swyMed Incorporated
Real User
Top 20
Allows us to access our devices on somebody else's network under their supervision, allaying security concerns

Pros and Cons

  • "The TeamViewer system has some built-in security. The TeamViewer client connects to the TeamViewer host securely. Only a certain number of authorized users on our side have access to the system. Even within that, an individual endpoint can be assigned to a group, where not everybody has access but, rather, just one or two people who are part of a support team might have access to that particular device. So TeamViewer has given us tools to be able to segregate who has access to different things."
  • "Sometimes we'll have a device in the field, and I'll click on remote control and it says "Can't authenticate." I'll double click in a different part of the TeamViewer interface and it'll say "Can't authenticate." Then I'll do it a third time and it connects. It's possible that it's just bad luck. It's also very possible that it's some bug within TeamViewer..."

What is our primary use case?

We use TeamViewer's infrastructure. We have TeamViewer host clients running on devices, some wired in offices, some connected to WiFi or even cellular, and we use it to get quick access to the devices for technical support.

The other use case, which is a little bit weird, is that all of our clients are in healthcare so they are very particular about who gets into their network and who has access to their network. What we've found is that when a client has our company's software on one of the servers in their network, sometimes they don't want to give us access to their network to maintain our software. So whenever they have a problem with our software, we open a TeamViewer session from a desktop inside their network to our tech support group, and that person gives us access to the server so that we can maintain our software.

Again, that use case is a technical-support-type application, but it's a little bit different than us managing our own devices in the field. It is a tool that allows us to access our devices on somebody else's network under their supervision, without needing our own unfettered access. It makes it easier for IT security to approve us and it makes it easier for the client to get us in, particularly in circumstances where there's some urgency around that.

The vast majority of our users use TeamViewer on Windows machines. Some are desktops, some are tablets, and the latter range from a Surface Pro to a more substantial, military-ruggedized type of tablet.

How has it helped my organization?

The big benefit is that we can do things pretty quickly and easily, remotely. In many cases, we save a service visit to the field, which would otherwise require us to have a very large field service force or we would need to pay for and train somebody else's field service force. Quite literally, without TeamViewer's capabilities, we wouldn't be able to run our business.

What is most valuable?

Remote desktop control is what we use in TeamViewer for 99.999 percent of what we do. 

We occasionally use the integrated text chat. There are circumstances we've seen where certain applications don't respond because they've got some sort of security built into them so that a remote user isn't able to control them. We can log in with TeamViewer, view the screen, and then leave instructions in the text chat that say, "Okay, please do this. Now, please do this. Now, please do that." We can actually guide the client through what they need to do, even for applications that don't allow a remote-control user to modify them.

The other thing that we're beginning to use more is the feature where, at the end of each session, you can type a quick note as to why you were logging in to that device. We've started putting in notes saying things like, "I went in to update Windows software," or, "I went in to fix a bug," or, "I went in to update our own software." We have not gone to the next step of reporting on, analyzing, reviewing, or using those comments as a way to drive additional follow-up. But it does at least give us the first step so that if somebody says, "Hey, why were you in my machine?" we can produce documentation that says why.

The TeamViewer system has some built-in security. The TeamViewer client connects to the TeamViewer host securely. Only a certain number of authorized users on our side have access to the system. Even within that, an individual endpoint can be assigned to a group, where not everybody has access but, rather, just one or two people who are part of a support team might have access to that particular device. So TeamViewer has given us tools to be able to segregate who has access to different things. That's been pretty helpful in dealing with some of our clients who have more "buttoned-up" security. They're able to say: "These two people have access to the devices." We have designated support people for that client who can go into their device and nobody else can even see that the device exists. That's really helpful.

The remote connection process is totally simple. It's as easy as it comes. We do install the software on field devices, but we also have TeamViewer's widget on our website. So, if you go to the support page on our website, you can click a link and download a white-labeled TeamViewer app that pops up and gives you a service key that you can fill in. That's an interesting tool. It makes it easier for customers who are not one of our owned assets to quickly download and light up a TeamViewer session so that we can help them with software configuration updates. Sometimes it's not even things that are our problem, but they don't know who else to call, so they call us.

What needs improvement?

I find it pretty easy to use. They redesigned the interface a while ago, and, honestly, when I first looked at it, it seemed sort of clumsy, but, now that I've gotten used to it, it's pretty darn easy. At first, everything was totally different. Doing simple things that I used to do, like connecting to a certain device, went from being obvious to a situation where there were just so many more features available that I had to click through to find the simple thing that I was trying to do.

In addition, and I don't know if it's TeamViewer's problem or not, I do find that sometimes we'll have a device in the field, and I'll click on remote control and it says "Can't authenticate." I'll double click in a different part of the TeamViewer interface and it'll say "Can't authenticate." Then I'll do it a third time and it connects. It's possible that it's just bad luck. It's also very possible that it's some bug within TeamViewer so that with the first click I'm waking up the TeamViewer connection, and with the second click I'm starting the connection but it's taking a long time because it's in a bad cell zone. Then, the third time, it's working because finally the thing is awake and recognized and is passing everything through. It may have nothing to do with TeamViewer, or it may be a TeamViewer issue. I don't know. That's the only thing I've really noticed that is problematic from our perspective. We'll see a device, we'll see it's online and that it should be available, but when we try to connect it doesn't connect. So that's a challenge.

In terms of additional features, the more TeamViewer can work with, and on, different devices, that would be helpful. We're doing some R&D with Cisco for some modems that have an IOx, which is a Unix-based compute area. If we could control that device using TeamViewer, that would be cool because, otherwise, we have to buy a Cisco cloud management software system to monitor those devices; similar to the Cradle Point. I'm not aware of any sort of onboard storage where we could install TeamViewer on a Cradlepoint, but if that is the case, then they should let people know about it because that would be a useful tool.

One of the things that would be a cool feature, and I'm not sure how TeamViewer could make it happen, would be to take an ad hoc TeamViewer session from our support website and, in the course of that, install the TeamViewer host, so that a client device would then become part of our network of machines we can get to relatively easily. That would be a huge time and energy saver. One of the things we find is that there will be a device and the users of that device have to use our software from time to time, but they don't use it often enough to really be good at it. So each time they use it, they go back through the learning-curve process. If we were able to quickly jump on their machine and walk them through what to do and how to do it, that would make it easier for them and easier for us.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using TeamViewer for four or five years. We started out on version 8 and we're up to 15 now.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability has been very good with the possible exception, as I mentioned earlier, of that three-clicks-to-connect issue, which seems to come and go. My guess is that it's something related to our devices being on cellular connections in areas with really bad cell service. But I've noticed it typically occurs when there's either a Windows update or a TeamViewer update, so it makes me wonder if maybe Microsoft introduces some sort of incompatibility that screws up TeamViewer and then there's a TeamViewer update that fixes it. We just have to remember to keep TeamViewer up to date on all of our clients in the field.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We only manage 30 devices. I could see, if we had a thousand devices, that the management part might become a little more complicated. Given that you can separate different devices into groups, and you can give different people access to different groups, it might be relatively straightforward. Huge scalability isn't something that we've had to deal with yet.

The monitoring, asset management, and endpoint protection are things we just haven't had the time or the mental energy to test. If they work as advertised, those seem like they'd be great features for simplifying remote management. In terms of expanding use of TeamViewer, those are next on the list. 

We'll be looking at endpoint protection; the patch-management and device health monitoring. Those are things we're very interested in. We want to do them to see how much, if any, additional CPU load and communication load is put on the device. We are a little concerned that we're going to clog up these fairly lightweight devices out in the field with a lot of administrative overhead instead of leaving them to do what they're supposed to do. We would probably do one or two as a test, just to see how it goes, and then start to crank it up. We have about 30 devices in the field that we monitor with TeamViewer; it's not like we've got tens of thousands.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have used technical support very sparingly, but when we've used it they've been great. They are very responsive, very knowledgeable, and they typically resolve our issue with one or two calls.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We actually initially started using it because we're based on the east coast in Boston and Washington, D.C. and we had a client in Chicago who had our software on a number of devices. He wanted those computers to be someone else's problem, namely our problem. He asked us to have some sort of solution in place so that we could quickly visit the computer, check that everything was working, upload Windows updates, upload software updates for our software — whatever was needed to make sure that they were happy and healthy, including rebooting them from time to time. That's how we started with TeamViewer. Since then, more and more machines have been added to the list; some with this client and some with other clients. We found it so easy with that first client that we wondered why in the world we weren't using it with everybody else.

How was the initial setup?

We find the initial setup of TeamViewer very straightforward, but not everybody finds it as straightforward as we do. It takes minutes. Deploying TeamViewer is incredibly easy.

What was our ROI?

I don't really have a firm answer for how many end-users can now be supported with one support person, versus how many could be supported in the past. We didn't really have a pre-existing field support organization. But it's very clear that by using TeamViewer and not needing to go do field views visits, that we're a million times more productive. The eight hours of travel that might've been part of a field visit to go help one customer now become eight productive hours that you can be helping other customers or doing other things.

A lot of the TeamViewer stuff is done by people who do technical support for sales or technical support for core development. If they can quickly pop into a user's computer, check something out, fix something for them, and go back to their work, they get a lot more development work done than if they have to get in a car and drive somewhere or get on a plane and fly somewhere to do that same look at the client's setup and what needs to be fixed.

If you take a $100,000-a-year employee and enable him to spend 20 minutes per service call instead of eight hours per service call, that's a pretty darn impressive return.

TeamViewer is a great value. We obviously wish it was less expensive because we want everything to be free all the time. But we do recognize that sometimes you have to pay for things, just like we try to convince our clients that they should pay for our software. 

TeamViewer is $600 or $700 per port per year, which we find that to be just fine. If we paid $100 per port per year we'd be happier, but we're very happy with the quality of the service and the capabilities that gives us. So it's been a great value for us.

I could go look up how many TeamViewer sessions we do per year, how many where we couldn't get the information through some other method, but that's where it becomes complicated to say specifically what the ROI is. 

It's clear that it's a valuable product. 

It's probably not valuable for everyone because there might be people who've got devices or systems where they have to hear it or smell it running to be able to diagnose what's going on. That's not really TeamViewer's strength. Its strength is getting visibility into a remote desktop, at least as far as we know, so that you can diagnose and treat a computer issue.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We've used a LogMeIn and there was something else that we've used, a solution that a partner of ours used which we tried for a while. TeamViewer seems to be a much more complete, stable, and reliable solution.

It's hard to make comparisons because it's been so long since I used LogMeIn. Longer ago than that, I used to use a VNC product that conceptually did the same stuff: gave me remote access to desktops. That was clunky, but it was probably as good as could be expected given the tools at the time. 

As a user who has been given remote support access via LogMeIn, what people have done with LogMeIn's help function seems easier than what we do with TeamViewer. That may be entirely because we're not organized well enough in our TeamViewer implementation to be doing it the right way. I certainly don't want to bash TeamViewer's capabilities, because I think it's more likely that we just don't know all the things we could do.

With LogMeIn Rescue, the technician gives you an ID number. You put the ID number in and they're in your computer. And TeamViewer can probably do the same thing. I just haven't gone through the process of learning how to make that happen. The way we do it via our website is that you click a link, you download something, it pops open, it gives you an ID, the person then tells you the ID, then you're in. It's a couple of extra steps, rather than just being a web browser access.

What other advice do I have?

If somebody asks me what I recommend for remote support, I always recommend TeamViewer. If they say, "I use LogMeIn, and I love it," I wouldn't be surprised. I've been a user of LogMeIn's remote support, and it seems like a pretty effective and easy-to-use tool. I'm sure the market is big enough for more than two players, but we're pretty comfortably ensconced with TeamViewer as our solution.

Do it. It's outstanding. It's very simple. We love it.

TeamViewer has a lot of additional features. They do audio and even video chat through TeamViewer. They do patch management, asset control, and all sorts of other things and we've actually thought about some of those other services, but we haven't taken the plunge yet.

We have not integrated TeamViewer with a single sign-on application. We actually use the TeamViewer host as often as we can on our remote devices. The device in the field is always on and always connected, and the people on our side who need to log in and access those devices will use the standard TeamViewer authentication process, which is pretty thorough. It's a username and password and it has a visual Captcha and then, when you register a device, it also emails and says, "Hey, we saw that you just signed in on this device from this location. Is that you?" They know what they're doing.

The idea of using TeamViewer for 5G deployments and smart poles with IoT devices is potentially interesting because we have a lot of Cradlepoint modems out in the field and Cradlepoint has a cloud management console. If it would be possible for us to use TeamViewer to access and manage those devices, that would be interesting because we pay $80 a year per device for the license in the Cradlepoint console.

In terms of end-users of TeamViewer in our company, we only have three ports and we have five or six usernames. There are three or four guys who do most of the work, remoting into various devices and rooting around to see if they can fix something or if there are things that need to be fixed.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Felician (Felix)Farcutiu
Technical Support for Commercial Theater Division at a media company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 20
We save dozens of hours a week utilizing this solution

Pros and Cons

  • "With an image, you can see immediately what's going on. You can run some tests. Without the solution, you need to do everything by telephone. It's not even thinkable."
  • "A feature that they could add is chat with sound to talk."

What is our primary use case?

We are in the commercial cinema theater business, like movies. We have things like simulators, advertising in commercial theaters all over the world. They sometimes have technical issues. So, we connect to see what is going on.

We use TeamViewer on computers, like laptops and servers. We also have tablets, but only one or two. Whereas, we have like 1,000 Windows Servers.

How has it helped my organization?

The sound and data transfer have improved the way our organization functions. For example, you can leave a TeamViewer application open and hear if a movie is playing with sound.

With an image, you can see immediately what's going on. You can run some tests. Without the solution, you need to do everything by telephone. It's not even thinkable. You would need to have VPNs with a lot of connections and virtual servers. This is so much more complicated. Weekly, we are saving dozens of hours using TeamViewer.

The remote connection process is pretty straightforward. Every new computer has a TeamViewer ID and password. 

What is most valuable?

The biggest advantage of TeamViewer is the way you can send files. For example, if you need to program something or exchange pictures, it's not that easy to to send a document to a secure network, like Boeing or a military company. Sometimes, sites even block all the Internet and you need to do everything by telephone. With TeamViewer, the main advantage is you can send files and documents easily. 

Another thing is you have sound, in the sense, you can hear. For example, we are playing short trailers, and you can hear it on the distant computer. This is useful to see if the sound is working. We will play trailers and see the image, but the customer will sometimes complain, "Hey, everything is good, but I don't have sound." With TeamViewer, I can hear the sound, not from my computer, but from his computer. This is super cool.

The chat function is handy, especially when we are dealing with people who don't have telephones in their projection rooms, or it's super noisy. Then, the chat is very useful.

Another feature that I like very much is the option where you can save the username and password. Once this is done, all you need to do is double click on the computer. It will connect directly. You don't need to type the password every time. This saves time because you cannot remember a dozen of passwords. You need to go somewhere and find them. But with this feature, you put them in once. Then, every time you are connected to particular sites, you just double click. There is almost no need for a repository for those passwords.

You can reboot remote computers with a feature called "Wait for Partner", so you don't need to monitor it. TeamViewer will pop up a little window when the client is back, saying, "Hey, I'm back online." You can work on something else, and if you need to reboot a computer, TeamViewer will notify you that the customer is back online. This is a nice feature.

What needs improvement?

You are limited with the regular TeamViewer. You have don't have sound. You cannot transfer things. It has been a long time (years) since I used the regular version.

In the beginning, you will need a bit of adaptation to use the solution. This is normal. For example, if you are switching to a car with the wheel on the left to a car with the wheel on the right, you will need a bit of adaptation.

Even now, we have customers who will not allow us to connect to them because of security sensitivity, e.g., military departments for clients. They will send us pictures or we can talk with somebody onsite, then we need to ask them questions. However, this process is long. It's costly also because of the time spent. Instead of spending 30 minutes, we will spend two to three hours for the same thing.

A feature that they could add is chat with sound to talk.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using TeamViewer Business edition for six to seven years. I have been using the regular version for more than 10 years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The product has been stable for many years; no glitches.

In the beginning, security was an issue because you could be hacked. Anybody could transfer data from your computer. Right now, from what I have seen and heard, they have put a lot of security in TeamViewer. It's very secure right now. Though, it is hard to be sure 100 percent all the time, especially in the movie industry. For anti-piracy and things like that, studios are very tricky and pushy to have tight security. The fact that they accept TeamViewer means they did tests trying to find security breaches, and everything has been good until now. 

There is not much maintenance need on our end as it is a lightweight program. The program upgrades itself.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have a limited business license. We can have 10 people on it at the same time. We are doing support all over the world. With the version that we have, we are allowed to have 10 people using it at the same time. For example, because we are working with engineering of other groups, if we go over 10 users, the eleventh person who wants to use TeamViewer cannot.

We have about 1,000 clients. Our support team is six or seven guys, plus engineering. Though we are not all connected at the same time. For example, if five of us are support 1,000 clients, then individually, we are supporting 200 clients each.

We are sending out computers every day. So, we will probably double the solution in a couple of years. Right now, it's okay. There are some days when we need to ask somebody, "Close your session because we need another guy from engineering to connect." So, we will probably need more licenses in the future.

How are customer service and technical support?

We never need tech support. We needed it once three years ago. We sent an email and had an answer almost immediately.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I used other solutions in the past, i.e., LogMeIn. At a certain point, we switched from LogMeIn to TeamViewer because LogMeIn was limited at 500 users.

How was the initial setup?

It was a bit tricky because we had so many computers. We needed to generate IDs, passwords, and administrate passwords. We needed to have a machine to generate these, as this was sort of an additional software. We had thousands of computers, so we needed to have an ID, a password, and administrator password for each of them. So, we needed to have software to manually input this information in TeamViewer every time. Once we did that, it was perfect. 

We aren't launching all the computers at the same time. We are launching them one at a time. Today, we are doing a server. Then, tomorrow, we may put TeamViewer in two or three servers. It's not a single shot. It's gradual. To install TeamViewer takes five minutes on each device, maybe more time.

What about the implementation team?

We contacted TeamViewer directly in Germany. We discussed the price and things like that. With TeamViewer, you go to the Internet. Everybody can do it. I can do it. My son can do it. You download the program. Then, if you switch from a normal to business license, all you need to do is just put your credentials in and the program will upgrade itself. It is very simple. All you need is the Internet.

What was our ROI?

We have solved a lot using TeamViewer. While I cannot quantify this in money, without TeamViewer, we would need to call everybody and work with 1,000 clients blindly. 

It is worth the money that you pay for it.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have a corporate license. The maximum amount number of users changes based on the amount you pay. E.g., with our license, there is a maximum amount of users who can use the solution at the same time (10 users). 

The cost is in the thousands of dollars per year.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We have some sites with LogMeIn because it's a matter of politics. Some companies will not allow you to install TeamViewer. They will only allow you to install LogMeIn. Some others will not allow you to install any software like TeamViewer, LogMeIn, or others. Therefore, you need to go buy a remote desktop (RDP).

For sites that do not allow us to install TeamViewer, LogMeIn, or other software, we use Cisco VPN. This requires a lot of software to install. It needs to run a program through it. You need some administrative passwords that need to be typed every time. It's a lot of security. In the beginning, you don't have sound from the other computer, and it's hard to transport files.

While we use LogMeIn and remote desktop, in 99 percent of the cases, we are using TeamViewer. TeamViewer is very easy to deploy when you have a corporate license. It's easy to install. It's upgrading all the time. Everything is perfect, as long as you pay.

Screen resolution is a huge advantage of TeamViewer over LogMeIn. We have clients with multiple screens. For example, if the client has three screens, when you are connected, you will be on one screen and don't know which one. With TeamViewer, you have a selection. You can select moving from screen number one to two or screen two to three. You can also put all the screens into an all in one or see the best fit.

It is easy to use, but LogMeIn is also easy to use.

What other advice do I have?

It is a great, amazing tool. All companies needs to have it. It's secure, fast, and reliable. 

In the beginning, you need to understand the features, e.g., what a button does. Once you get all of that, it's very easy to use. I'm a heavy consumer of TeamViewer, a sort of professional of it, so I know all the features. But, even for somebody seeing it for the first time, it is very easy to use.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Learn what your peers think about TeamViewer. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2021.
552,407 professionals have used our research since 2012.
StephenDay
IT Director at a healthcare company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 20
Convenient, easy to use, and can connect using the Internet

Pros and Cons

  • "It's very beneficial and time effective on how we are able to provide quick support. We've quadrupled our effectiveness as an IT support because we have cut down all that unnecessary travel time, even between floors."
  • "Some of the additional features, like the meeting stuff, is making it too cluttered."

What is our primary use case?

The use case is mainly PC and laptop support for our internal staff, where TeamViewer is distributed locally through Group Policy.  Occasionally, we will use it to assist clients having trouble with our services, and in those cases, we will send them a customized linked invitation through TeamViewer.

How has it helped my organization?

I have used it as a troubleshooting measure with remote people. With a quick glance at TeamViewer, we can say, "Hey, your machine is not reporting as being online or available. Therefore, check your Internet connection. Make sure you are connected to WiFi or Ethernet." Probably nine times out of ten, that's instantly what it is. We can instantly tell if computers are online or offline, then help in the troubleshooting process. We have set it up in such a way that IT will be on the call prior to the connection and that the person on the other end has to accept the connection. We want people to scrutinize and make sure that, "Okay, do I know this person? Why are they connecting?" and, they have to approve it. This is so they can recognize and be familiar with who we are . Also, the background changes to black, so they know when we are on their PC. Furthermore, we utilize two-factor authentication and other features for stricter security on the management side of TeamViewer.

What is most valuable?

We have some people who are on the road. TeamViewer is very convenient for us if they have problems. We are able to hop on their computer and help resolve those problems remotely. In those situations, it's good to get in there and be able to push files directly to the machine and work remotely that way. 

As far as searching, using the console installed on your computer and seeing the list of all your computers, we break them down by department. Therefore, we categorize each computer by department so we can do a search and pull up the name of the computer along with the username and user’s phone extension. It streamlines the connection and remote support to somebody. 

Occasionally, we have used the meeting and presentation capabilities from a support perspective. For instance, if we have a client that we work with and one of our end users is having difficulty with their software, then I would set up a presentation on my computer. I could also simultaneously TeamViewer into our staff computer, which I could then show through presentation and the remote connection to our client. They can see what's going on and how things are happening. It also gives them the ability to switch control over to them. We didn't want something large running in the background all the time. The fact that it has a relatively small footprint was attractive to us.

What needs improvement?

We don't really use the chat feature. Some of the additional features, like the meeting stuff, is making it too cluttered. Also, we don't need TeamViewer to be a competitor to our video conferencing service, although that basic service might be nice for people who don't want to go through the extra expense. We are basically satisfied with TeamViewer for doing remote support.

We use InvGate, which is a help desk and asset management tool that we are currently using. They announced about six to seven months ago that they will be integrating TeamViewer into their help desk system. We haven't heard any recent developments yet, but we know that is on their horizon.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using them for about eight years. We originally worked with them directly out of Germany. Later on, they got a Florida presence, and we started working through their onshore office.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is pretty stable for the most part. On rare occasions where the remote machine that we're trying to connect to is not responding, the simple fix is to terminate the process, kick off a new one, and everything is good to go. It's really low maintenance. Once deployed, it's almost a set and forget type thing. 

There are only four IT staff in our organization who need TeamViewer seats. That's why it's pretty cost-effective for us.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Each of my IT staff has that ability to hop on and do things at any time. We can assist not only from our machine, but from our iPad. If I needed to hop on somebody else's computer, I can do support from my PC, iPad, or even my smartphone. It's very portable as to how I can work. I like the fact that I can do support on different platforms.

With the small IT group that I have, I do want to be able to quickly support our entire organization without having to run my staff to death.

How are customer service and technical support?

Their support has always been good. Over the years, there have been things where I had a question come up or deployments. Their support has been spot on. With TeamViewer, we don't get the lag time with responses from their support. They have support in our time zone. Their sales office is in Florida now. For two years, the support has had pretty good turnaround times. They're very friendly, supportive, and responsive. They do a great job.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

At a previous place that a colleague worked, they used Dameware. This was their remote solution, but it required a local network connection. So, if they were remote users, they had to connect to the VPN before actually remote connecting to their machine. So, switching to TeamViewer from Dameware was a big change for him because it didn't require VPN. Eventually, someone turned us (my current company) onto TeamViewer. We have been pleased with them ever since.

How was the initial setup?

We did the installation through Group Policy. Initially, we looked at doing QuickSupport capability, but now with the new way of doing it, it's so much better. QuickSupport was quick and pretty streamlined. At the same time, it required the end user to first initialize, know about the QuickSupport link, provide a password, and provide the session ID, which is a bit more cumbersome to use than being integrated through the cloud and our management portal. Now, we can just add their computers as they are connected and all the user needs to do is hit "Accept" to share their screen. They don't have to search on their desktop for an icon or open anything. The prep work and testing probably took the longest. Once it was streamlined out and deployed through Group Policies, the deployment was quick. 

Recently, TeamViewer started supporting iOS devices. We do have corporate iPads and probably need to install TeamViewer on them. That is something on our to-do list, but have not done it yet.

What was our ROI?

We did some rough ROI estimates years ago. The solution has proven itself. We would not want to do the job without it. When I first started the organization, I had to drive out for an hour to a remote office and do some support. It was very time-consuming. You just wasted time doing that kind of stuff. Now, you can just connect and help them. They are happier because you can give them quick turnaround resolution. They don't have to wait for you to schedule time to come out there. So, it's very beneficial and time effective on how we are able to provide quick support. We've quadrupled our effectiveness as an IT support because we have cut down on unnecessary travel time, even between floors.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have an annual subscription that is just under $1,900 with no additional costs. We get these promotions about upgrades and stuff like that, but we haven't had a need to add more seats. Users can also use TeamViewer for home use with a non-commercial free license.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We have looked at several other options in the past (e.g., VNC, Webex, and GoToMeeting) before taking on TeamViewer. A lot of them were just way too expensive. We are a small nonprofit organization, so pricey was not something we could look at. The fact that TeamViewer was cost-effective was a big sell for us. The fact that it supports many platforms was also attractive.

What other advice do I have?

Originally, the initial knee jerk reaction is if there is trouble, you run over there to help. That was almost an expectation of the users too. You have to change the culture a little. Once you have the hang of it, you realize how much more quickly and effective you are in providing support than the way you used to do it. Breaking old habits to become more effective was something that many of us had to learn in the very beginning because we were not used to being remote. Now, it's still personal, but in a different way. 

Set up your platforms where you have it all deployed completely, so people know that it's there and accessible. Give them a heads up that you have the capability. Sell it as a benefit: This is the way we can help you quickly, no matter where you are at. Then, they will realize that they are the winners. Sometimes, you may have to assure them that you are not there to spy on them. Sometimes, people think that if you get on their computers, you're poking at their personal stuff, which isn’t the case. Finally, we train our folks that they need to realize that they should be protective of who can get on their computer. They are in control of their device, but when they need our help, we can be there. They just have to click "Accept" to let us in. Their screen going dark is an indicator/flag to them for when we were on and when we're not. People just want to have that extra edge of privacy, which is important as well.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
TB
GIS Developer at a transportation company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Excels when I want to take control of a remote computer

Pros and Cons

  • "The best feature is the remote access and being able to control another person's computer when you're showing them something, or teaching them how to do something during training, or fixing a problem they're having."

    What is our primary use case?

    We use it for interacting with other employees. They'll have TeamViewer, but they're working from home in another state. We link up our computers and, that way, it's almost like we're sitting next to each other. We can see what the other is doing on his computer.

    We do use the technical support mode sometimes, which is the same thing as collaboration. You just log in to somebody's computer and fix that computer remotely.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It's smoother. It's faster. It stays on. It seems to have a really good connection and it's consistent.

    Once we got it for the company, the IT manager deployed it and started using it for technical support. He doesn't use it a whole lot, but when he does need it, it really helps him. He can get in there and see what problem another computer is having.

    What is most valuable?

    The best feature is the remote access and being able to control another person's computer when you're showing them something, or teaching them how to do something during training, or fixing a problem they're having. Also, if I'm at home or even on the other side of the country like I am right now, I can log in to my computer at work.

    On slow internet connections, TeamViewer works much better than other products. It seems to deal with slow internet connections better. If we are in a remote location and we want to access our computers at work, or a server, we can just log in to TeamViewer and it seems to connect.

    There's a lot more you can do with it as far as collaboration and team co-operation go. You can get a lot of people on it. We're not utilizing it for that. For example, if the boss wants to hold a meeting, and have everybody join the meeting, he can do so and have different people do presentations. They can do their presentations and interact on one computer. If the boss is showing something and he says, "Well, take over and you show me what you think," that person can take over the cursor and start running it as if he's sitting right there in the meeting. I don't see other products doing that very well. 

    With the other products that we're currently using, somebody has to say, "Well, let me share my screen and then they have to start sharing their screen and they have to turn it over to somebody else. Everybody has to load the program and get on the same page on their own computers, rather than just switching the control of the presentation to somebody, wherever that person happens to. With TeamViewer, they can take over the presentation right on the same computer that the presenter was using and give their presentation without having to switch screens. I love that part.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using TeamViewer for a couple of years, but we just got the licenses in June.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability has great potential. We could be using this for a lot more people in our company.

    Our company has free products in use, like Microsoft Teams. The problem with Teams is that it's not as clear. It locks up and sometimes just doesn't work as well. But it's free, and everybody's using it, so it's hard to get people to move to something that's not free.

    Although TeamViewer is a little more dependable and works much better, the cost is high. I can have a meeting online and have 35 people on it, as long as they have installed TeamViewer or log in to the website. They can all get on and they don't have to pay. But since everybody is using another product, and they've been using it for years, it's hard to scale up and get them convinced to use something different.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I've used the vendor's technical support a few times. They're responsive and they took care of my concerns. They showed me how to do things correctly. They were really good, easy to work with.

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup is fairly easy. The basic connection is easy. When I started using the different services, I didn't know how to go in and start up a meeting. It seems to have a lot of features that have a little bit of a learning curve. I don't have time to learn all those features, so I just use the basic stuff.

    On average, deployment takes 30 minutes.

    I deployed it myself, as did my co-worker who is also a developer.

    What was our ROI?

    We haven't seen ROI. We're using it strictly for IT and technical, internal use.

    I do use it a lot for remote accessing of my computer at work. I don't have to do anything, such as turn my work computer on. It just logs right in and I can start using it. I can also log in to other peoples' computers. All you have to do is hit a button and say, "Yes, allow me in." It makes it so simple to connect. It's worth the money, even though it's a little bit expensive.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    It does what I need it to do but I think it's expensive. It wasn't easy for me to get approval from the company to get it. Not a whole lot of people in our company use it, but the five or six of us who do use it get a lot out of it.

    It's costing us about $700 a year, per license. For the company it was $2,000, and that was on a deal. I think it would have been $2,200 or $2,300. 

    I also got it for a friend who was working remotely. At the end of his year's subscription to TeamViewer, he wasn't using it much anymore. He was using something else. He called them to tell them that he did not want to continue with it for another year, but they said, "No, you didn't give us the 30-day buffer at the end of the year which is required to cancel for the coming year, so there's no way you can cancel now." They wouldn't let him out of the contract. He didn't read the fine print. We then read the fine print it did say that you have to give that number of days' prior notice before you cancel at the end of the year. If you don't give them that prior notice, you're stuck. I didn't like that.

    I've looked at other companies that provide the same type of thing and their pricing is about the same.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I tried using WebEx and another product as well. They didn't work as smoothly as TeamViewer. We've tried using Microsoft Teams. Using that, you can take over and control the other person's cursor, but it's really cumbersome. When I use TeamViewer and get it up and going, it's almost like I'm just sitting in front of that computer. Aside from the couple of icons and menus that are off to the side, you can't even tell that you're not using the actual computer.

    WebEx is great for doing meetings. TeamViewer may be doing great for doing that but I haven't really used it for that.

    TeamViewer is much better for doing remote access than WebEx. For the stuff that I use every day, TeamViewer works better than other products, especially when I want to take over control of another computer. The other products that I've tried are not nearly as good when I do that. TeamViewer is the best.

    What other advice do I have?

    The biggest thing I've learned from using TeamViewer is that you shouldn't spend a whole lot of time trying to find other products to save a little bit of money, when you already have a product that you know is working great. Don't waste your time. Get the product you know is working well, one you have confidence in and a little bit of experience in. Don't try to cut corners. I spend a lot of time trying to find other products because the company doesn't want to spend a few thousand dollars for just me and one other person, but when the IT person got on, then he was able to get them to use it.

    In my opinion, it's the best remote access product on the market. The service is great. The product is great.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    CB
    Maintenance Supervisor at Atlanta Metropolitan State College
    Real User
    Top 20
    One of the easiest solutions to pick up: easy to use, deploy, and adopt

    Pros and Cons

    • "TeamViewer has been one of the easiest, right off the bat products, that we have employed at the college. We have had no issues. It's been one of the easiest solutions to pick up."
    • "Sometimes, the app can be a little cumbersome when accessing certain aspects of the program."

    What is our primary use case?

    We're using TeamViewer at the college to be able to remote in. My boss and I are the two main users. We've used it to remote into our desktops so we can monitor the HVAC program at the college, access control, etc. Plus, if we need to grab files, or something, off of our personal computers at work, we can.

    My boss and I both have TeamVeamer installed on PCs at the campus. We have the app on our mobile phones. I have it on my personal laptop at home along with my tablet at home.

    We remote into PCs at the campus, and one of those PCs is used as a server.

    We are using the latest version. We are using TeamViewer 15. I think we started on version 13.

    How has it helped my organization?

    When I'm offsite and there is an HVAC problem, I can remote in and check out what's going on from anywhere. I don't have to be at the college to do it. It saves me driving time and the hassle of having to leave from wherever I'm at. I have actually accessed it while being on vacation and was several hundred miles away from the college.

    What is most valuable?

    • It's easy to remote in.
    • It is reliable and stable. The program is not constantly interrupting, dropping, or hanging up.
    • It has been very easy to use.

    What needs improvement?

    Sometimes, the app can be a little cumbersome when accessing certain aspects of the program. I don't know if that's a TeamViewer thing or the application I'm trying to use on the actual PC.

    As far as the connection, there has been no issues with the connection. It's just once I'm in the app and using it, I haven't been able to decide if I can do all functions with the app, like I can if I'm sitting actually at the computer. I don't know if that's a TeamViewer thing or a computer issue. I'm still on a Windows 7 based, six-year computer which is due for an upgrade. It's a minor issue, and some of the minor issues I have may go away once my desktop computer at work is upgraded.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    Approximately six months.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I am very happy with the solution's stability. 

    So far, we have had no issues with security's success because you need to know the passwords and machine IDs in order to get into the system. TeamViewer identifies each device with a unique identifier, then each device has a separate password. Once you have closed TeamViewer, the password will change periodically. It's not a constant password.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Most of the stuff resides between my computer and my boss's computer. My boss is the director of facilities and I'm the maintenance supervisor.

    Eventually, when we're done (hopefully not soon after the first of the year), we're going to be able to go to every building on campus and deploy what we need to look at. That way we don't have to worry about whether we have lost a phone signal, the wireless on campus is working right, etc. Eventually, we'll have a machine on campus that we can just go to and access what we need.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We called the support only one time. That was just to make sure we were doing something right, and we were.

    On a scale of one to 10, with 10 being the highest, the technical support was easily a 10. This is based on their responsiveness and helpfulness. We were on hold with them for just a couple of minutes, then the technician that we talked to was very helpful. We didn't have to go back and forth, checking on him a bunch. He was able to answer all our questions. He called my boss back the next day to make sure there were not other issues and everything was working.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    LogMeIn and ShareConnect were the only two solutions that we have previously used. Then, somebody told us about TeamViewer. We looked at it. We did a trial run with TeamViewer. We liked it, so we started engaging with them about the cost and everything else. 

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was very straightforward. You go to TeamViewer or the link that they send you. You click on the link to download and install all the information right off the Internet. It's fairly self-explanatory. 

    My boss and I set up all four of our devices, the mobile app on both our phones and both our computers, in less than five minutes.

    What about the implementation team?

    We had a webinar with TeamViewer to go over some basic, simple things. We only needed 15 to 20 minutes. It was pretty much understanding the basics. 

    If we had any other questions, we could call in. I haven't personally had any issues where I've had to call support.

    What was our ROI?

    Over the past six months, we have probably saved several thousand dollars just in the cost of either my boss or me having to go up there. We can make sure stuff is turned off and on where somebody might have left something on or off, saving on the utility cost for the college.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    TeamViewer was willing to give us a one-year package. Whereas, a lot of the other companies that we explored were paid by the month or quarter. It's just easier for our finance people at the college if we can make a one-time yearly payment.

    TeamViewer has multiple licensing options. 

    The price was cheaper than what we were previously paying. At the time that we went with TeamViewer, we were using ShareConnect. The TeamViewer package was about half the cost and able to have a bigger number of users.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    The remote connection process has been one of the easiest of all the different programs that we have used. We have used LogMeIn and ShareConnect. There was another one back in the very early days. This solution has been the easiest process to connect into. Comparatively, TeamViewer is much easier to deploy, easier to use, and adopt than LogMeIn or ShareConnect.

    What other advice do I have?

    The solution is definitely a 10 (out of a 10). TeamViewer has been one of the easiest, right off the bat products, that we have employed at the college. We have had no issues. It's been one of the easiest solutions to pick up.

    Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    TA
    Windows Server Administrator
    Real User
    Top 20
    Significantly increased our productivity, making it easy to access and troubleshoot remote sites

    Pros and Cons

    • "We also use it a lot for remote site assistance. We've set up our internal authentication for unattended access to our remote sites. That makes it very easy and convenient to remotely connect with our users and our client machines whenever we need to. It's set as a direct, secure connection. As long as the station has internet access, we can see it and it makes remote support very simple."
    • "It's not the program itself that's an issue, but there is a need for some better documentation on how to use the web portal Management Console. That seems to be a bit lacking in directions, if you aren't paying attention and you don't know what to do. Better documentation would make it a little bit easier to set things up in different groups and share groups between people."

    What is our primary use case?

    It allows us to access some of our remote sites, especially if we're having internal issues such as a VPN tunnel dropped from site-to-site. We can still connect to the local machines at the different offices as long as we still have an internet connection, and we can log in and troubleshoot networking issues remotely.

    TeamViewer is installed specifically on our desktop machines. We do also use some laptops that are on Windows 10, and there are a couple of Mac OS X machines we've used to remotely connect.

    How has it helped my organization?

    It allows for quick, easy access to our remote sites. It increases our ability to troubleshoot, as needed, at critical times.

    In addition, some department managers have people split between sites. For example, part of operations is out here in Olathe, Kansas, and the other part is in Oklahoma. They're able to hold team meetings and present through the TeamViewer meeting sessions. The HR department is also able to hold meetings with the people here and those in other offices.

    What is most valuable?

    We've been using the team meetings, the collaboration portion. It's pretty simple to share and presents screens during team meetings.

    We also use it a lot for remote site assistance. We've set up our internal authentication for unattended access to our remote sites. That makes it very easy and convenient to remotely connect with our users and our client machines whenever we need to. It's set as a direct, secure connection. As long as the station has internet access, we can see it and it makes remote support very simple. 

    As far as the security goes, we've decided that it does set up a pretty good, secure tunnel from point to point.

    Overall, it's pretty simple. It does the jobs that we need it to do.

    What needs improvement?

    It's not the program itself that's an issue, but there is a need for some better documentation on how to use the web portal Management Console. That seems to be a bit lacking in directions, if you aren't paying attention and you don't know what to do. Better documentation would make it a little bit easier to set things up in different groups and share groups between people.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We've been using it for 14 to 15 months.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    It's a very stable program. We haven't noticed any issues with it dropping in and out of service.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    It scales. Since we have the corporate license, we're not limited to any number of machines. We install it on all our devices. The scalability is fine.

    Between people who have a laptop or a desktop, and some of them have both, about 100 people utilize it. It's the company standard.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I have not used their technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We were only utilizing internal RDP, for the most part. TeamViewer is about five times faster for remote assistance.

    How was the initial setup?

    The setup is pretty simple. It is a small install-MSI. You can either install it through group policy or push it out through your normal deployment methods onto Windows machines. You set up the services during the deployment for it to connect to the main account, and you can share different computer groups, for the different site locations, from the main account to any of the other admin accounts. You can show who has default access and what groups are already tied into it. It's pretty straightforward.

    Our deployment took a couple of hours for 120 machines. We deployed the MSI out through normal deployment processes.

    What was our ROI?

    It has been useful and it has increased our productivity by some 400 percent. It's helped us a lot.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    We have the corporate license. It's extremely cheap.

    For what we utilize it for it's not a super-expensive license. It was about the same or a little bit cheaper than LogMeIn but it's more stable and a better program for what we need in our company.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We looked into VNC and LogMeIn. TeamViewer was a much simpler, easier way to connect up. It's a fast and simple setup and it just works.

    What other advice do I have?

    The product is simple to set up and install and use.

    Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
    Devanand PR
    IT Support Executive at a healthcare company with 51-200 employees
    Real User
    Top 5Leaderboard
    Very helpful for tech support with good stability and scalability

    Pros and Cons

    • "The product is quite stable. The performance is good."
    • "They should release features such as Augmented Reality into both plain and standard versions of TeamViewer."

    What is our primary use case?

    TeamViewer is for desktop support. It's for giving remote support to users. If I was a member of tech support, for example, I could access your desktop remotely to see your screen, keyboard and mouse. I'd be able to access it from anywhere in the world and I can control it just as if I was sitting in front of your system.

    How has it helped my organization?

    The solution allows for remote tech support that has the capability for us to see a user's screens. We can do this from anywhere in the world. We don't need to be in the room with a user to help them.

    What is most valuable?

    The solution offers a very helpful tech support application. If you need help, the tech support can use the application to help you right on your desktop.

    They have these options of TeamViewer such as Augmented Reality so that you can draw on it and you can ease somebody into a process, or assist somebody in doing some actions. They can also integrate that into the Pilot TeamViewer. Right now, they use it as a separate thing. They originally introduced it under Microsoft Hello and it should be integrated into the TeamViewer Pilot version soon.

    The product is quite stable. The performance is good. 

    We've found that the scalability is excellent.

    What needs improvement?

    They should release features such as Augmented Reality into both plain and standard versions of TeamViewer. Nowadays, you have to wait for another release, or another product version while Augmented Reality features should just be integrated into the standard version of TeamViewer.

    The product could be less expensive. There are many similar products that are free these days.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the solution for well over ten years. It's been more than a decade. I have a lot of experience with it.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution has very good stability. The performance and reliability are very high. There aren't bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze. 

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability of the solution is very good. A company shouldn't have any issues with scaling.

    Just the administrators, like myself, have access to the solution. Everybody else gets support through the product via us.

    We do plan to continue to use the service.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We've never actually reached out the technical support. I can't speak to their level of helpfulness or responsiveness when it comes to troubleshooting issues. 

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have previously used TightVNC and UltraVNC. UltraVNC was one of my favorites. Most of the free open-source products are quite good.

    How was the initial setup?

    The installation process is pretty plain and simple. It's not complex at all. A company shouldn't have any issues with the implementation.

    It's simple software to install. There is no cloud or anything. The ID is maintained by the cloud, however. When we install the product, it also creates a unique ID. That unique ID is maintained in the cloud maybe, however, we don't do anything with that as they maintain it. The ID is unique to your system.

    There is tech support application as well which is just small and easy. You just need to download it and it works for the one time whenever you want it.

    There isn't a need for dedicated maintenance. It's pretty simple to use.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    There is a subscription option for licensing the product.

    The price could always be a bit less.

    What other advice do I have?

    We are using the latest version of the solution at this time.

    Overall, on a scale from one to ten, I would rate the solution at an eight. We've been very happy with the solution over a number of years. It's always been helpful.

    I would recommend the solution, however, I'd be happier with the product overall if they could lower their prices.

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    KY
    ROV Technical Superintendent at a energy/utilities company with 1-10 employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Provides easy-to-use and very capable remote meeting functionality

    Pros and Cons

    • "It's pretty easy to use. Just key in an ID and password and connect. For meetings, just enter the meeting ID and connect."
    • "If were to I put myself in the seat of a small business owner, I would prefer TeamViewer to be more of a pay-once-and-own-it solution, rather than paying via a subscription model (although I am using the free version). Only annual subscriptions are available. It makes paying for it the first time seem a little daunting."

    What is our primary use case?

    I am using it more for meetings with my colleagues who happen to be at another worksite. I am using the meeting functionality more often now, compared to the remote-control functionality which I used more often previously.

    I use it on a Windows PC.

    What is most valuable?

    It's pretty easy to use. Just key in an ID and password and connect. For meetings, just enter the meeting ID and connect.

    What needs improvement?

    If were to I put myself in the seat of a small business owner, I would prefer TeamViewer to be more of a pay-once-and-own-it solution, rather than paying via a subscription model (although I am using the free version). Only annual subscriptions are available. It makes paying for it the first time seem a little daunting.

    It also renews automatically, annually, and you are only allowed to cancel it by applying for the cancellation 28 days in advance through a support ticket. They should really tend to that.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been using TeamViewer for a very long time. Previously, I used it as a personal tool to log in to my parents' or friends' computers to help them troubleshoot issues. About a year ago, I started looking for an alternative to using Skype for video meetings. In the end, I found TeamViewer’s meeting solution to be pretty smooth and suitable for use in China. I have been using that functionality, occasionally, for about a year.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The solution is very stable. 

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I haven't used technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We were previously trying to use Skype for Business for meetings. It did not work very well in China so we had to find something else.

    How was the initial setup?

    In my opinion, the setup was not that complicated. I found it more difficult setting up the local Chinese version of Skype for Business. When I got the company to install TeamViewer instead, they found it much easier to register and connect.

    It took just a few minutes of downloading, installation, and registration on the site and it was good to go.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    The price is reasonable. However, it doesn't seem that anybody in my company wants
    to spend.

    What other advice do I have?

    My advice is to try it for free first.

    For security reasons, we do not have an IT department that connects to the main IT infrastructure in our parent companies. So we have to come up with our own solutions at minimal costs.

    At the moment, I only have three close colleagues using it in my organization. They are all on the technical side. We discuss engineering solutions and procedures during our meetings.

    I have always felt that TeamViewer is extremely capable software and, in my many years of using its remote connection service, it has never let me down.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    On-premises
    Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.