TeamViewer Scalability

John DeMillion
Director of IT at Chester County Intermediate Unit
TeamViewer seems to scale well in one sense, being easily mass-deployable to thousands of Hosts. But the badly-designed Groups and kludgy nature of the central management, combined with significant missing features on the macOS Host and lack of support for dynamic MAC addresses on VMs is a problem with scalability in a complex organization, and TeamViewer should address these major problems ASAP...right now they're just lucky that the other available cross-platform remote control solutions actually suck more than they do. ;-) View full review »
Link Porterfield
Founding Member at epic.network
Scalability is hard to say, because I am the lowest scaled out degree of utilization. The clients that I use it on are relatively small. I am the only person using the tool at my company, as the founding member. I am using it fairly extensively. It is on almost every customer computer that I support. Anyone who has a maintenance agreement with me will have a copy of it. At this time, that is under 100 customers. I have done work for people who have used it in larger environments: Hundreds upon hundreds of teams running it. So, I have seen it perform well in a huge environment. I have seen it perform well in a large, multitenant environment. View full review »
Dan Wilkening
Network Administrator at Parksite
You could add as many users on here as you want. We probably access around 500 devices. We have eight licenses now. Therefore, we have eight users who can remote access machines. I have three monitors that I use. While it's not real common, there are times when I'm on three to four people's machines at one time trying to fix different things. I imagine if I had more monitors that could actually be organized enough to make sure I am the right stuff on the right machines, I could probably do whatever our Internet could handle. I could probably do 20 people at a time. As we add more PCs (or whatever devices), TeamViewer gets added onto them. I use TeamViewer all day long, like it is my right arm. I haven't run a report in quite awhile, but I spend probably half of my day using the software on somebody else's machine. View full review »
Find out what your peers are saying about TeamViewer, Microsoft, LogMeIn and others in Remote Access. Updated: October 2019.
378,124 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Jason Miller
Application Engineer at AirTies
It scales pretty well. Every time that we get a new machine, we install TeamViewer on it. However, we only buy a new machine every 14 months or so. There are no obvious limitation to how many end users that we can support. E.g., our home office has six test locations with an entire development team and QA team where have 50 to 60 people. Our development, QA, and IT teams have access to TeamViewer. Our development team uses it the most. The IT team, which is about eight people, uses it a little. The QA team use it as needed, but not daily. On and off, 20 people use it, but 60 people have access to it. View full review »
Tawanda Sibanda
Sponsorship at a non-profit
It's one of the best in my opinion, especially the pro which even multinational companies could use. View full review »
RossCrutchfield
Associate General Counsel at a energy/utilities company with 1,001-5,000 employees
No, it is easily scalable. View full review »
Find out what your peers are saying about TeamViewer, Microsoft, LogMeIn and others in Remote Access. Updated: October 2019.
378,124 professionals have used our research since 2012.
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