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WebLogic Suite OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

WebLogic Suite is the #7 ranked solution in our list of top Application Infrastructure tools. It is most often compared to Oracle SOA Suite: WebLogic Suite vs Oracle SOA Suite

What is WebLogic Suite?
Oracle WebLogic Suite is an integrated solution for building onpremise cloud application infrastructures that span web server, application server and data grid technology tiers. It includes Oracle WebLogic Server, an application server for developing and deploying applications across conventional and cloud environments, Oracle Coherence Enterprise Edition, Oracle Web Tier, Oracle TopLink, Oracle Java Mission Control and Flight Recorder, and other component technologies.
Buyer's Guide

Download the Application Infrastructure Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: September 2021

WebLogic Suite Customers
State Revenue Office Victoria, Colab Consulting Pty. Ltd., Reliance Commercial Finance, Center for Railway Information Systems, Sascar, Banca Transilvania, UL, Chhattisgarh Infotech and Biotech Promotion Society, MCB Bank, Pacfico Seguros Generales
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Archived WebLogic Suite Reviews (more than two years old)

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Hamid Mukhtar
Assistant Professor at a university with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
A solution with a good update deployment feature that's scalable and is easy to set up

Pros and Cons

  • "Scalability on the solution is great. It's very very easy to scale."
  • "The licensing for the solution is pretty expensive. It may be the most expensive solution, if you were to compare it to the competition."

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the update deployment feature. Update deployment is when you already have an application deployed and you want to handle a new deployment. The feature ensures you don't need to add or remove anything. Rather, you just need to update and the feature will handle everything else, like adding the new features that have been released on the new deployment. It's very simple.

What needs improvement?

I had issues when I installed the SSL. With WebLogic, it's a very lengthy process.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for four or five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution isn't 100% stable, but it's pretty good. I'd rate it 3.5 out of five in terms of stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability on the solution is great. It's very very easy to scale.

How are customer service and technical support?

I've never had to reach out to technical support.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is very simple. 

If you have everything ready from the OS side, it requires one to two hours to deploy.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The licensing for the solution is pretty expensive. It may be the most expensive solution, if you were to compare it to the competition.

What other advice do I have?

I'd suggest those considering implementing the solution to move to the cloud. It's very simple and easy.

I'd rate the solution eight out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
NS
Oracle Fusion Middleware specialist at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Easy to deploy and maintain, and straightforward to use

Pros and Cons

  • "The feature that I have found to be the most valuable is the ease of deployment."
  • "This solution would benefit from the inclusion of a ripple start function for clusters."

What is our primary use case?

I work with Telcos, one of the cell phone providers in South Africa, and they use it for their billing infrastructure. 

The applications running on the WebLogic suite are for billing and customer CRM, which goes out to the call centers and the dealers. We maintain the environment.

What is most valuable?

The feature that I have found to be the most valuable is the ease of deployment. 

In the beginning, you do tend to struggle a bit, but once it's deployed, then everything falls into place and maintaining it is quite simple.

What needs improvement?

It is difficult to say which features can be improved at the moment, as we are not working with the most current version and I am not aware of the features offered in the new version. 

Once we catch up and move on to version 12C, we need to see what can be migrated to the cloud. 

It might not be suitable to migrate the systems to the cloud, or maybe only portions of it. For example, it makes sense for our web services to go on the cloud, but not the actual application, the CRM system.

If we are considering the version that we are currently working with, then I would say that it's all fairly straightforward when it comes to using it. However, there are some small things, such as being able to restart clusters, where you can choose to restart each server one by one instead of all at the same time.  

The ripple start is what we refer to as shutting down and restarting one server at a time in a cluster. In other words, when you kick off a ripple start, and it would go through, it will shut down the one instance, and start it up, then it would move to the next one. It wouldn't shut them all down, and I wouldn't have to manually, stop one, start it up, wait for it to come up and then move down to the next one. This solution would benefit from the inclusion of a ripple start function for clusters.

Also, the cloud integration, which I've heard is very strong with Oracle, it's the shift and lift methodology. 

IBM WebSphere used to do things like that, where you could do a ripple start as opposed to shutting everything down and it would manage each one individually. That would be useful. if it's a live environment we have to ripple start. That's the big one, otherwise, we are pretty happy with everything.

The debugging function is nice on the Weblogic, but one thing WebSphere has, is, that you can apply the debugging permanently, or just until the server is restarted. 

That might also be a feature that would be nice on WebLogic, but not critical because we turned it off afterward.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for ten years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This solution is very stable.

The only time it's not stable is when the code has a memory leak, or it's heap dumping or the garbage collection isn't fine-tuned. That is not the environment, it's the code. The environment itself is extremely stable.

We have to get caught up as the version we are using is out of support. 

The buzzword right now is cloud, and at some point, we have to see what we can take to the cloud and what we cannot. There are plans to move in that direction.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is scalable. We have added extra servers and extra instances when it's been required. 

We don't run on VMs, we run on IBM LPARS. We don't run VMs where you can have them firing up, on-demand, but it is scalable for our purposes.

How are customer service and technical support?

Officially it's not supported, but we do get support when it's required. For example,  approximately six months ago there was that day-zero vulnerability bug that had to be patched. 

The patch that we applied on WebLogic actually broke some environments.

We logged tickets and worked with Oracle and they were able to support us, isolate the issue, and give us new fixes. 

The support was very good and worked very well.

From this experience, I would rate the technical support quite highly. They were able to pinpoint the issue quite rapidly and assist us with a new patch. I would rate them a nine out of ten.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Previously, we used the IBM product called WebSphere.

WebSphere and WebLogic are both very similar. They have the same purpose, the same end. I liked the way WebLogic is compartmentalized in the server where you can go and find the configurations, and see it on a file. It's fairly file-based, the data source is everything. 

WebSphere wasn't stored quite that way, so you couldn't work as nicely outside the system. 

There might have been a few other tweaks that WebSphere had which Oracle doesn't. But on the whole, I would say Oracle is far better, it more superior to the IBM product.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is complex. We did a migration from WebSphere to WebLogic.

The reason it's complex is it was already running, but it was a very different animal than WebSphere. There were code changes required, which fell to the developers on the development side. On the operational side, things like fine-tuning little things like the data sources work a bit differently, but once you figure one out, then the rest all falls into place.

At the moment the deployment model we use is on-premises, and nothing has been migrated to the cloud. It's a project for the future.

The deployment was approximately just over one year to get it migrated fully to where we were stable enough to turn off the WebSphere.

It was a little bit better than I had expected it to be. We all felt it would be an eighteen-month to a two-year project, and it did come in a little bit less than that. But of course, the business expects it in three to six months. We did try but realized that it was not going to happen unless everything just magically works the first time.

I'm on the operations side, I'm not on the development side. We look after the infrastructure and the upgrading.

The developers are a large team. On the operations team, we have approximately ten people. One person can do a feature release, which is what we call a deployment, in an evening. This is done three times a week.

What about the implementation team?

We do deployments roughly once a week, three times a month. 

We have our own in-house developed deployment manager, which we call the Deployamater, and they set up all the deployments. The manager fetches the EARs, JARs, pages, and JSP files, then it deploys them. 

We don't use the automated deploying via Oracle. We manage it like that, but we do it in an offline environment. 

We duplicate our environments and we go to our offline environment, deploy there, test it first, and then switch the traffic to the new environment that it's being deployed to.

What other advice do I have?

I am a subcontractor to Vodacom, and the company I work for is a vendor, and they are an approved vendor with Oracle.

It is difficult to offer advice because every scenario is different, but I would suggest that you use the available expertise. There is a lot of expertise, don't try to do it all alone.

I wouldn't go back to WebSphere and for me, I would say it is the market leader.

I would recommend this solution and I would rate this product a ten out of ten.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Reseller.
Find out what your peers are saying about Oracle, F5, Apache and others in Application Infrastructure. Updated: September 2021.
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SH
Senior Enterprise Architect at a healthcare company with 11-50 employees
Real User
It easily connects to other Oracle products and services. However, this solution doesn't have connectors to other external applications.

Pros and Cons

  • "A valuable feature is its integration with Oracle Database."
  • "It easily connects to other Oracle products and services."
  • "This solution doesn't have connectors to other external applications."

What is our primary use case?

It performs well.

How has it helped my organization?

It is connected with our systems, and our systems run on Oracle. It is beneficial because it integrates with our internal systems. This resolves half of our problems for our internal system integration, data retrieval, and subscription to specific events.

What is most valuable?

A valuable feature is its integration with Oracle Database. We have another system running Oracle Database which can be easily updated from the database and pushed to the middleware. Also, it easily connects to other Oracle products and services.

What needs improvement?

We need to have more adapters and connectors, especially healthcare system adapters. This solution doesn't have connectors to other external applications. We connect with other vendors' and other companies' systems, therefore we have been asking Oracle for specific interfaces because we have been unable to integrate with these systems using any adapters.

For how long have I used the solution?

More than five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scaling is costly. 

How is customer service and technical support?

Technical support is very costly.

We tried to connect our healthcare systems with Oracle, and it needs a lot of support. We would needs to hire a consultant, and the consultant would cost us $4,000 a day. Therefore, it's very costly to integrate with the other systems, which is why we are looking for other alternatives.

How was the initial setup?

I was not involved in the initial setup.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

In general, it is a costly solution.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Microsoft.

What other advice do I have?

I rate this solution as a seven out of 10, because it is not fully satisfying our needs. It is good in specific areas, but it's not satisfying all of our requirements. It is not a one stop shop.

Most important criteria when selecting a vendor:

  • It is affordable.
  • Easy to use.
  • Ready documentation, training, and examples.
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
James Lui
Team Lead - Oracle Applications DBA at a energy/utilities company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Provides a uniform technology platform between multiple application installations.

What is our primary use case?

Support custom developed mobile applications while retaining middleware compatibility with other on-premise Oracle systems such as AP Imaging, eBusiness Suite 12.2, and SOA Suite.

How has it helped my organization?

Provides a uniform technology platform between multiple application installations, whether Enterprise Resource Planning or Customer Relationship Management (ERP/CRM) based systems, Imaging ingestion and integration, or document content management. Administration techniques are consistent with only minor UI changes between versions, providing relatively seamless upgrade integration for future deployments and upgrade of the web platform.

What is most valuable?

Ease of scalability through both asymmetric and symmetric clustering; ease of integration with existing and potential future Oracle product technologies; leverages many industry-standard technologies for application support (JSON, REST, SOA, JavaBeans, J2EE); continues to evolve towards a fully-integrated solution designed to front-end enterprise applications, whether related to transactional websites, dynamic content management solutions, or acting as an intermediary service provider between other web/URI data sources.

What needs improvement?

Cloning and replication (detailed below) could be much more flexible and standardized. WebLogic out-of-the-box installations are only templated and automated for Oracle-packaged applications. For independent installations, answering the myriad WebLogic setup parameters can be quite confusing as to what are the correct parameters, other than the defaults (some of which are not provided).

For how long have I used the solution?

More than five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

WebLogic tends to be extremely stable once appropriate memory and CPU requirements have been determined for a particular application under production load conditions. When given insufficient resources, like any web application platform, we have had our share of out-of-memory errors or exhausting a Java virtual machine's capacity.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Being extremely scalable is one of WebLogic's best features. If you anticipate dramatic upward changes in capacity, one of Oracle's Universal License Agreements might be the best approach as it decouples the CPU-based license costs from the costs to scale. In our case, we often use the same WebLogic servers for multiple applications to reduce overall licensing and maintenance costs. As long as the application is compatible with a particular version, they can co-reside (multi-tenant) on the same WebLogic cluster, keeping in mind that the additional CPU and memory resources need to be accommodated.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

Service with Oracle tends to be directly related to your amount of new product purchasing. This can be a disadvantage to mature and stable installations that don't tend to expand much (i.e. don't expect weekly follow-up calls.) A significant improvement will be experienced by customers who adopt one of Oracle's emerging technology products (such as Cloud-based WebLogic Services) wherein the success of your implementation often becomes the next customer reference for Oracle. That doesn't last forever, but it's nice to experience during the often rocky start-up stages of new technologies.

Technical Support:

My Oracle Support takes a little getting used to for new customers used to more narrowly focused technology vendors. The vast number of different products Oracle supports has created a bit of a maze of how to get connected to the technology group best capable of answering a particular question, or dealing with an issue. For example, what starts as a "My application isn't available" issue might stem from access management, database, middleware technology, the application group, or because some third-party plugin failed causing a cascade failure. Oracle does attempt to support all of its products with alacrity, but it helps a lot for you, as the customer, to know how it all fits together. Your perception could range from 4 to 9/10 depending on your experience level with the products.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We use a half-dozen different application server technologies - which one is used depends more on application compatibility than choosing one specific one-size-fits-all solution. These include Microsoft IIS, LAMP (Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP), InfoSphere, and many smaller vendors.

How was the initial setup?

One major pre-installation question that catches you unaware is the question of a "standalone" versus "single node cluster" installation style selection. Single-node clusters can be scaled up and out. Standalone installations are single-node only, and would have to be re-installed to enable clustering. This is an old throwback to the original licensing model, and tends to be a source of odd frustration if you choose the wrong one inadvertently. Most of the modern upgrade releases are now out-of-place upgrades (meaning they install to new installation file system bases, and not overlaying an existing install). This change was designed to maximize uptime, but does mean you'll need the extra storage available to have the side-by-side software reside during the upgrade process.

What about the implementation team?

This depends on whether we have experience configuring the new application being hosted, or not. WebLogic by itself is simply an application hosting architecture. But most application deployments are not as simple as visiting an online store and clicking an Install button. WebLogic is not what I would recommend for quickly standing up a proof-of-concept beta application. But when architecting a solution for hundreds, thousands or millions of users, it's perfectly suited.

What was our ROI?

For our installations, we've recovered our initial procurement costs within the first five years of operation, simply by re-using existing excess capacity to host additional applications. Once configured for production load, there is very minimal day-to-day administration required, and integration with Oracle Enterprise Manager monitoring allows full transparency to all processes and targets within the WebLogic technology stack.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

As an application platform, you will need to carefully forecast your overall user and process load, and service-level agreements (SLA) in order to purchase an appropriate CPU count licensing, and host licensing for clustering, if needed. If your growth and capacity requirements aren't easily determined, you may want to consider Oracle's hosted Cloud options which have more of a capacity on-demand pricing model (especially the Public Cloud version.)

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

As mentioned, we purchase based upon application-focus, and not for custom development. As a result, choice of application hosting technology is driven according to compatibility and certification, rather than technical feature sets.

What other advice do I have?

Cloning and replication of WebLogic instances isn't exactly a rote science. Because the stacks become secured against the hosting environments, encapsulating and re-configuring a working installation into a new set of hosts (with differing names and IP addresses) involves several procedures to re-secure, re-encrypt and reinstate the software to hardware trust certificates. While this process is relatively encapsulated for WebLogic in eBusiness Suite, sometimes it's faster to simply re-install WebLogic on the new hosts, than attempting to re-configure from a backup from a different host set. This is differentiated from the process of scale-up or scaled-down of a cluster, which is a well-defined process by comparison (and automated as an Oracle Enterprise Manager provisioning process.) Once deployed, most change management involves the deployment of application services between instances, and not replication of the WebLogic environment itself.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
ITCS user
Consultant Principal on: MuleSoft Expert, Oracle Fusion Expert, webMethods Expert; Dev, SA, EA, PM at Visual Integrator Consulting
Video Review
Consultant
One of the features that it provides is the ability to build robust applications that can support many simultaneous transactions.

What is our primary use case?

Microservices

Integration

AppDev

Mobile

Supply Chain automation

CRM (Salesforce and Dynamics integrations)

How has it helped my organization?

A lot of times customers really have to consider 'do I want to use a solution like WebLogic or do I want to look at an opensource solution and what kind of app server container do I want to begin to look at.' Some of the great features that we see with WebLogic is obviously it's coming from an Oracle brand so you're going to have a lot of good support when it comes to that.

That could be product support when there's issues, implementation support or whatever the case may be. We always know that Oracle is going to be putting out a lot of new features and stay in somewhat close to where the industry is going as far as getting their features out the door. Some of the other great features in addition to application development is doing content management because obviously in the Oracle WebCenter Suite which is part of the Oracle WebLogic Suite you can begin to do things like building portals, building contact management, building collaborative integrations to social and cloud and whatever the case may be.

What is most valuable?

WebLogic is and has always been a leading application development platform even going back to the BEA days, so some of the great features that WebLogic provides is scalability, the ability to build very robust applications that can support many simultaneous transactions, many users and the ironclad and robust enough to be enterprise level as well as user facing for the broader public community.

Some of the application features that are out there are the ability to build rich applications using frameworks on WebLogic such as Oracle Application Development Framework or Oracle Mobile Framework or whatever the case may be but a lot of these are very feature rich plugins into WebLogic in order to develop and build user facing applications.

What needs improvement?

Probably some greater ability to support API management and some greater ability to do things like supporting Node.js. Obviously they have some of that already in there but just basically getting some additional programming languages so that you can build some application consumption patterns a lot easier. Maybe the ability to create more lightweight containers so you don't have to always create a very heavy WebLogic instance. We've seen WebLogic in the cloud and it works but obviously some more investments into that. The ability to work on Amazon EC2 to be able to scale up provision, de-provision on virtual cores within the Amazon environment and be able to do that quickly and seamlessly for customers. We'd like to see some more features in the future around that.

For how long have I used the solution?

More than five years.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

WebLogic is a really robust platform for scalability. They have a lot of features in it around clustering, disaster recovery, elasticity to be able to provision and de-provision instances of WebLogic pretty quickly. We feel scalability is actually one of the sweet spots for WebLogic, the ability to ramp up for concurrent transactions, concurrent users and so forth. We've done a lot of performance testing on it. We've ramped it up through some of our performance testing tools and seen really good results. The key is to be able to maintain a good solid level of performance even though the number of users is increasing or the number of concurrent transaction is increasing and we've seen really good metrics come out of WebLogic. Still the ability to do things like supporting ten seconds or less transactions or click times for end-users and that's really the key is can this still have the same level of performance as you're increasing the volume in the load?

How is customer service and technical support?

Some of that comes from experience because obviously we've done a lot of implementations. We've had to do things such as open support tickets, call in to support, it can obviously range from low priority to high priority production downtime systems. If you're not an Oracle customer and you haven't had that experience yet, you can actually ask one of the Oracle partner such as us what's been your experiences of support.

We do things as well where if Oracle support isn't moving fast enough for a particular issue, we'll actually sometimes provide that level of support to a customer as well. It's not to replace Oracle support by any means but certainly, it's an ability to support the customer and their applications but Oracle being a very large company, they do a lot of R&D investment in the support so we've seen pretty good results from that. Sometimes folks are always concerned that the person working on their support ticket doesn't have the knowledge. We've noticed Oracle has done a pretty good job at doing escalations from their Tier One support to their Tier Two and Tier Three in order to get the software engineers working on patches or fixes and so forth.

Overall, the support has been pretty good. If you've been an Oracle customer in the past, you would expect the same level of support but if you haven't had that chance, then you would try to ask some questions, do some references with other Oracle customers, talk to their partner community and so forth in order to do that level of evaluation.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Information to consider when choosing a vendor:

Scalability, capacity planning and growth. Can the infrastructure support what the customer's needs are? Can they create applications faster? Is this a framework or a tool or a product set that will make our customers, our IT engineers work faster and more efficient?

Secondarily is do they have robust scalable things like enterprise logging. Is their enterprise logging sufficient so that customers can have full auditing and traceability of all their run time transactions. Analytics is always important as well. Version control and continuous integration and DevOps, the ability to support these features are very important now to today's customers.

If a customer has a couple of hundred instances of WebLogic, how quickly can they support those environments whether they're cloud or on-prem, the customer needs to be efficient. The ability to be able to support environments very quickly is a key criteria as well.

What other advice do I have?

I don't give anyone a ten but from an app server perspective, WebLogic is definitely going to be a 9 to a 9.5 because they've been in my opinion one of the leading app servers on the market today. They've been around for so long, they're proven. I shouldn't say all but a great majority of all the Fortune 2000 have either worked with WebLogic in the past. Because they have such a large footprint, such a large adoption path, they've got dedicated teams, product engineers that are working on a lot of great features. A lot of customers have been very pleased with WebLogic.

The only improvements we'd like to see is a little bit more enablement on the cloud stuff because obviously like we said, WebLogic works in the cloud but we'd like to see things like enablement in the Amazon EC2 cloud where a lot of customers are working very heavily in those environments.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We're partners.
it_user521724
President at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Consultant
User-friendly Admin features, easy to implement and reliable

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature to us is its user friendliness as well as its admin features, which are much better then the previous versions of Oracle.

How has it helped my organization?

First of all, what we do is, we have some products which run on WebLogic. They're really great, in the sense that we have never found a bug or the like. It's just very easy to implement. It's been going great. There are really no issues at all.

What needs improvement?

I am not a very techy guy, though I know how to use the product. Areas for improvement should come from my developer.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's pretty stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It has scaled well to our needs over time.

How are customer service and technical support?

When you open a ticket it is resolved in a timely fashion, absolutely. Obviously Oracle has a an advanced process with these things, like the priority of the service request. Based on that it is resolved. We're happy with how it gets prioritized and the service we're getting.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

The previous version was called Oracle Application Server. That was the one we used. That used to have a lot of issues. 

After Oracle started pitching on WebLogic, things were really great. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We didn't consider any other vendors along the way. We are Oracle partners and we are very happy with this. We will continue with them.

What other advice do I have?

I would say out of the servers that we have used - one is an Apache Tomcat which is Open Source, which we typically use for demos and other things; and then the WebLogic, and then the Oracle Application Server. These are the three things we have used. I rate WebLogic at least a nine out of 10.

I would say I'm very happy with it and I would recommend using this product. However, if you want to use Oracle Apache Tomcat, that is also something which works great. The only thing with Open Source is, as long as long as it's working great, it's great. But, there is a possibility that if something goes wrong you will need support. The support will cost as much as buying WebLogic.

It's always better to go with Oracle, where you know what you are getting and you will get good support. That way, I would recommend WebLogic.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user521553
Lead Systems Engineering Architect at a financial services firm with 5,001-10,000 employees
Vendor
In terms of the number of sessions you can run, it's powerful, compared to JBoss.

What is most valuable?

We have JBoss, too, and it's far better than JBoss. It’s more powerful, in terms of the number of sessions you can run on WebLogic, compared to the other product.

How has it helped my organization?

Our transactions, our business runs smoother. It provides greater efficiency and performance.

What needs improvement?

The patching is painful; if they wouldn’t release as frequently. Every time you have a patch, you have to upgrade. I’d like to see them improve the release of the patches; instead of monthly, maybe every three months; or specify which patches are critical, which everyone should have, and which ones are optional, like how the OS patches are.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We haven’t had any stability issues; it's pretty stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We haven't had any scalability issues.

What was our ROI?

We have seen good ROI on Oracle compared to JBoss.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at JBoss. We decided to use the Oracle product because our Oracle stack is pretty stable. We have SPARC and we have Oracle databases. It makes sense in terms of getting better ROI.

What other advice do I have?

If you don’t want any outages, you want peace of mind, and your application running smoothly, I would say go for WebLogic. Why would you want a painful experience? It's smooth.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user521655
Senior Software Engineer at Crown Castle
Vendor
It's industry tested and available on various platforms.

What is most valuable?

I like that it's industry tested and available on various platforms. I'm not sure we use any specific features of it, other than it’s a robust web server; the services, the database pools, good integration with Oracle database 12c, which is another product that we have.

How has it helped my organization?

Having the Oracle support has improved how my organization functions. We have a support contract for it 24/7. That's a huge thing, having the support.

Being able to stay on top of the release cycle and having reps that can keep us in the loop has been a major benefit.

What needs improvement?

I would like to see better integration with some of the cloud stuff that Oracle provides. We just went to an Oracle hackathon; a couple of us, a couple of weeks ago. It's a little confusing how the WebLogic Server, the cloud services and some other services interact; we were just trying to see how that works. What's the vision Oracle has bringing those two worlds together? That's what I'd like to see.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I’ve found it very stable. We haven't really had any issues that are related to the product at all.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have scaled it. We've had this product several years and kept upgrading it, of course. We started out with, maybe, one server instance, and then two, and now we're up to four. We haven't really had any major issues, as long as you follow the standards. It's been great.

How are customer service and technical support?

We had some Oracle people that we worked with that came in house. We were doing a major upgrade. People came and helped us day-to-day for a number of weeks. It's been great. As I’ve mentioned, having the 24/7 support, especially from our DBAs’ perspective, has been a real plus.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Back in the day, probably 15 years ago, there were very few application servers. WebLogic was, at the time, the best. Of course, it changed hands a few times. Oracle finally bought it. We were an Oracle shop. We had a database. There just wasn't really any other solution, in terms of having the quality and support that we enjoy. I think that's important.

When you're running a business and you have customers around the country depending on you to get the business done, having the up time, having the server stable, and having that support behind us is the most important thing.

When I’m looking at a vendor, it's important that they follow industry standards, and have very strong support. I keep coming back to the 24/7 support. That's been invaluable for us; to be able to pick up the phone, or have somebody get on site with us because it's a mission-critical type of business we're in. That's the most important; having the Oracle name and standard, following that.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

At that time, there were only a few options. At a previous company, we even made sort of a homegrown, homespun version, aspiring to get to WebLogic someday, when we had enough money. This was a start-up.

When I joined the company I'm with now, they had just become an Oracle shop and started with this product. I think we evaluated JBoss at the time. Every couple of years, we evaluate and see what's out there.

WebLogic's still the strongest, with all the suite of products that they provide.

What other advice do I have?

If you are serious about it and you have the money to spend, then spend it on a winner. There's all kinds of open source stuff out there. Stuff is changing constantly. If you're trying to run an enterprise business, it's sounds great, it's great for proof of concept. But, when it comes down to it, you don't want to build your own car. You want to buy something that's got some standards, has a big name behind it. That's what I suggest.

I don't give anything a perfect rating. This is software. It's constantly changing. Again, the breadth of services that are provided, and the support, again, is key to us.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
James Lui
Team Lead - Oracle Applications DBA at a energy/utilities company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Provides a uniform technology platform between multiple application installations, whether ERP/CRM based systems, Imaging ingestion and integration, or document content management.

What is most valuable?

Ease of scalability through both assymetric and symmetric clustering; ease of integration with existing and potential future Oracle product technologies; leverages many industry-standard technologies for application support (JSON, REST, SOA, JavaBeans, J2EE; continues to evolve towards a fully-integrated solution designed to front-end enterprise applications whether related to transactional websites, dynamic content management solutions, or acting as an intermediary service provider between other web/URI data sources.

How has it helped my organization?

Provides a uniform technology platform between multiple application installations, whether Enterprise Resource Planning or Customer Relationship Management (ERP/CRM) based systems, Imaging ingestion and integration, or document content management. Administration techniques are consistent with only minor UI changes between versions, providing relatively seamless upgrade integration for future deployments and upgrade of the web platform.

What needs improvement?

Cloning and replication (detailed below) could be much more flexible and standardized. WebLogic out-of-the-box installations are only templated and automated for Oracle-packaged applications. For independent installations, answering the myriad WebLogic setup parameters can be quite confusing as to what are the correct parameters, other than the defaults (some of which are not provided.)

While many seasoned DBAs like to attribute how Oracle's 3-click Weblogic "Typical Install" type is easy-peasy, what doesn't meet the road requirements is that 90% of current WLS installs are to support purchased Oracle applications (OBIEE, EBS, SOA Suite, Identity and Access Management, etc.) and not the historic period of when companies bought BEA as an enterprise alternative to Apache.

The OUI templates that come with the packaged applications tend to whizz you through the 27+ pages of the "Custom Install" without guidance as to why you're picking certain options, nor why you should or should not select different options. With most WLS build settings, you can't go back and reconfigure an existing setup once deployed. For example, even though it's the same WLS engine used, I cannot change an EBS configured WLS to run as a SOA Suite shared install. I have to do it again as a separate installation.

Costs customers money and time. Works, yes, but less than efficient.

For how long have I used the solution?

Installations first went live in 1998 with version 9.x (originally packaged as BEA WebLogic through IBM) supporting Maximo (Enterprise Asset Mgt) and Cognos (BI) and have continued post-Oracle acquisition to support eBusiness Suite R12.2 and Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

Generally the only major concerns involve legacy Operating System desupport which has occurred over the years. Platform migrations have been planned ahead of each lifecycle change in order to mitigate application availability issues. Since the binaries between OS's are not compatible, we do have to exercise some level of re-implementation each time a platform (hardware or software) change forces such migration.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Weblogic tends to be extremely stable once appropriate memory and CPU requirements have been determined for a particular application under production load conditions. When given insufficient resources, like any web application platform, we have had our share of out-of-memory errors or exhausting a Java virtual machine's capacity.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Being extremely scalable is one of WebLogic's best features. If you anticipate dramatic upward changes in capacity, one of Oracle's Universal License Agreements might be the best approach as it decouples the CPU-based license costs from the costs to scale. In our case, we often use the same WebLogic servers for multiple applications to reduce overall licensing and maintenance costs. As long as the application is compatible with a particular version, they can co-reside (multi-tenant) on the same WebLogic cluster, keeping in mind that the additional CPU and memory resources need to be accommodated.

How are customer service and technical support?

Customer Service:

Service with Oracle tends to be directly related to your amount of new product purchasing. This can be a disadvantage to mature and stable installations that don't tend to expand much (i.e. don't expect weekly follow-up calls.) A significant improvement will be experienced by customers who adopt one of Oracle's emerging technology products (such as Cloud-based WebLogic Services) wherein the success of your implementation often becomes the next customer reference for Oracle. That doesn't last forever, but it's nice to experience during the often rocky start-up stages of new technologies.

Technical Support:

My Oracle Support takes a little getting used to for new customers used to more narrowly focused technology vendors. The vast number of different products Oracle supports has created a bit of a maze of how to get connected to the technology group best capable of answering a particular question, or dealing with an issue. For example, what starts as a "My application isn't available" issue might stem from access management, database, middleware technology, the application group, or because some 3rd party plugin failed causing a cascade failure. Oracle does attempt to support all of its products with alacrity, but it helps a lot for you as the customer, to know how it all fits together. Your perception could range from 4 to 9/10 depending on your experience level with the products.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We use a half-dozen different appliication server technologies - which one is used depends more on application compatibility than choosing one specific one-size fits all solution. These include Microsoft IIS, LAMP (Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP), InfoSphere, and many smaller vendors.

How was the initial setup?

One major pre-installation question that catches you unaware is the question of a "standalone" versus "single node cluster" installation style selection. Single-node clusters can be scaled up and out. Standalone installations are single-node only, and would have to be re-installed to enable clustering. This is an old throwback to the original licensing model, and tends to be a source of odd frustration of you choose the wrong one inadvertently. Most of the modern upgrade releases are now out-of-place upgrades (meaning they install to new installation filesystem bases, and not overlaying an existing install). This change was designed to maximize uptime, but does mean you'll need the extra storage available to have the side-by-side software reside during the upgrade process.

What about the implementation team?

This depends on whether we have experience configuring the new application being hosted, or not. WebLogic by itself, is simply an application hosting architecture. But most applicaiton deployments are not as simple as visiting an online store and clicking an Install button. WebLogic is not what I would recommend for quickly standing up a proof-of-concept beta application. But when architecting a solution for hundreds, thousands or millions of users, it's perfectly suited.

What was our ROI?

For our installations, we've recovered our initial procurement costs within the first five years of operation, simply by re-using existing excess capacity to host additional applications. Once configured for production load, there is very minimal day-to-day administration required, and integration with Oracle Enterprise Manager monitoring allows full transparency to all processes and targets within the WebLogic technology stack.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

As an application platform, you will need to carefully forecast your overall user and process load, and service-level agreements (SLA) in order to purchase an appropriate CPU count licensing, and host licensing for clustering, if needed. If your growth and capacity requirements aren't easily determined, you may want to consider Oracle's hosted Cloud options which have more of a capacity on-demand pricing model (especially the Public Cloud version.)

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

As mentioned, we purchase based upon application-focus, and not for custom development. As a result, choice of application hosting technology is driven according to compatibility and certification, rather than technical featuresets.

What other advice do I have?

Cloning and replication of WebLogic instances isn't exactly a rote science. Because the stacks become secured against the hosting environments, encapsulating and re-cconfiguring a working installation into a new set of hosts (with differing names and IP addresses) involves several procedures to re-secure, re-encrypt and reinstate the software to hardware trust certificates. While this process is relatively encapsulated for WebLogic in eBusiness Suite, sometimes it's faster to simply re-install WebLogic on the new hosts, than attempting to re-configure from a backup from a different host set. This is differentiated from the process of scale-up or scaled-down of a cluster, which is a well-defined process by comparison (and automated as an Oracle Enterprise Manager provisioning process.) Once deployed, most change management involves the deployment of application services between instances, and not replication of the WebLogic environment itself.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
ITCS user
IT Analyst at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Easy Deployment, Reduces Rework but Expensive

What is most valuable?

One of the most valuable features of WebLogic is that deployment is an easy process. The code can be deployed on multiple instances without rework.

How has it helped my organization?

With a huge number of servers for our application, manual deployment would be an extremely tedious, error prone and time- (hence money-) consuming process. WebLogic has assisted us in this aspect.

What needs improvement?

The initial setup and administration does require expertise. While bigger organizations can afford to have dedicated horizontal teams, I assume smaller organizations may not be able to afford this. The default setup should include more features such as more scripts and more users with different privileges, which could resolve this issue.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have used this solution for over four and a half years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I did not encounter any issues with stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I did not encounter any issues with scalability either.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

WebLogic was our first choice.

How was the initial setup?

We did not require vendor support. Setup was done by my team and me.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Licensing is expensive but it is worth the cost. If you are going to utilize all its features, then you should go for it. If you do not have enough budget, you could choose for other freeware options and use automation and orchestration tools instead. This will surely have an impact on stability in the initial phases of implementation.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Although, I was not working while choosing it, WebLogic has been the first choice for organization. However, now after many years we are evaluating to look for other freeware options.

What other advice do I have?

You need to consider the licensing and upgrade costs. In addition, it will help to have a dedicated administration team.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user436116
Architect at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Consultant
There are multiple products that compete with it, but it's completely Oracle, which means that the licensing with other Oracle products is great. I would like to see better scalability.

Valuable Features

I think that the best feature of WebLogic, as far as middleware goes, is that it's very license-friendly. It's a part of the suite of products that our DBA has included, and I trust that because it means the DBA really wanted it. There are multiple products that compete with WebLogic, but it's completely Oracle, which means that the licensing with other Oracle products is great.

Room for Improvement

Because it's in the middleware layer, I would like to see better scalability for scaling up. Also, they should provide sizing guidelines so that customers can take it and deploy it.

Use of Solution

WebLogic has been there for a while. I've had my hands on it since it Oracle acquired the company in 2008.

Deployment Issues

We've had no issues deploying it.

Stability Issues

It's a no-brainer that it’s stable. The only thing you should pay attention to is how scalable it is.

Scalability Issues

You should run your workload on WebLogic then see if it scales well. Then based on that, you keep on adding the WebLogic server to scale more.

Customer Service and Technical Support

I think technical support is knowledgeable, but in some instances I've seen they are completely focused on one single product, not seeing the whole end-to-end solution of the customer. That's where they get lost.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user486504
Programmer Analyst at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
Vendor
We get to host all of our HFM web apps, business users can log on and it runs seamlessly.

Valuable Features:

The most valuable feature of WebLogic for me is that we can host all our web apps on it, HFM mainly.

Improvements to My Organization:

It's been great overall. We get to host all of our HFM web apps on there, all the business users can log on, and it runs seamlessly. It suits our business needs pretty well.

Room for Improvement:

When you run the WebLogic admin console, it takes a few minutes to come up. Having the admin console come up a little quicker would be an improvement.

Stability Issues:

It's definitely stable. We have weekly reboots, and it seems to come up after the weekly reboot. We have no problems with stability.

Scalability Issues:

It is scaled to our needs and there have been no issues. We just run a fresh install and the WebLogic sites come right up.

Initial Setup:

The initial setup was relatively straightforward. Basically, it’s a couple check boxes, a few nexts and then a couple configuration items and connection strings. An amateur computer user could go through it and use it straight away.

Other Advice:

Before you configure anything for Oracle, make sure you start the WebLogic admin console on the primary web servers.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
it_user436173
Senior Oracle Database Administrator at a pharma/biotech company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Vendor
​We've found it to be the most reliable and stable platform for building our Java applications. High Availability with it and Oracle Linux together was very complicated.

What is most valuable?

The stability of it is probably the most valuable feature for us. We were initially using Oracle Application Server, but found that Oracle advanced quite a lot with WebLogic in terms of stability. We noticed a huge difference and, in comparison, Application Server was really quite flaky.

How has it helped my organization?

We've found it to be the most reliable and stable platform for building our Java applications.

What needs improvement?

What I didn't like about it initially was the fact that WebLogic was a purchase from BEA. It wasn't Oracle's product initially, and I found whenever they initially released the product, it was quite buggy. Hence, we didn't move away from Oracle Application Server immediately. Now in the latter versions they seem to have eliminated all the bugs, but I think if Oracle does take over software or middleware from other companies before releasing their own version of it, I think they should be testing it a little bit more to eliminate any bugs before it goes in the market.

Also, our WebLogic and Oracle Linux are bound together, that's what we were looking for as our High Availability solution. Getting Oracle Linux highly available was difficult, and getting WebLogic highly available was difficult, too. But then trying to put the two products together as well was even more complicated.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

We've had no issues with deploying it.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Again, it's very stable, and we've been pleased with it in comparison to Application Server.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It's scaled sufficiently for our needs.

How are customer service and technical support?

We found Oracle technical support to be very, very difficult to deal with. To eventually get to the right engineer, you have to go through numerous escalations. I think the escalation process probably needs to be revisited by them to provide a better experience for paying customers.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

For us, going to WebLogic was the support. Oracle Application Server was out of support, so we went to WebLogic and now we have support on our projects that we're rolling out for many years to come.

How was the initial setup?

The actual WebLogic we're running runs on Oracle Linux, and when we put that on, we found the documentation to get the High Availability running quite complicated as well. Also I would say when Oracle releases these new versions of their products, you find that the support you get isn't probably what it should be. It takes a long while for support to ramp up and to get the knowledge of the new products, so I think a good thing would be for these products to come out unreleased to businesses. Then the support people should be brought right up to speed and be ready for any questions because by the time you get to an engineer who maybe knows the product or knows the situation you're in, it takes an awful lot of escalation time.

What other advice do I have?

For installing or looking at the database, I would say look at the components that you need within the database. What we generally find is that most of the features that we want, or most of the features that are available in Enterprise Edition, we actually wouldn't use. So take time and you might actually see them only by using Standard Edition.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
ITCS user
Manager of Oracle Technology/DevOpsManager at a retailer with 1,001-5,000 employees
Vendor
The most valuable features are that it's easily deployable and easily scalable.

Valuable Features:

The most valuable features are that it's easily deployable and easily scalable. It'll shrink and can grow as much as you want. Those are the benefits, but when compared to other products, such open-source Tomcat, we've considered moving from WebLogic to Tomcat because WebLogic is very expensive.

Improvements to My Organization:

It's scalable for the company and easily deployable. The GUI and integration with SSO is more beneficial than other available options.

Room for Improvement:

It's definitely a complex solution. It throws at least a million lines of errors just for one password. You can get a small issue that could potentially generate about a thousand of lines with warnings, and those warnings might mean nothing. It will just pop up warnings, so you'd have alerts for nothing. It's not that easy from the admin perspective if you're not really familiar with what you're getting into. It's not 100% GUI, so that you need to know lots and lots of configuration files.

Deployment Issues:

We've had no issues with deployment. In fact, it deploys very easily.

Stability Issues:

WebLogic is not a light product. Java uses the whole memory of the server so it's a memory hog.

Scalability Issues:

We've had no issues with scaling it for our needs.

Initial Setup:

The initial setup was easy and pretty straightforward.

Implementation Team:

We did the implementation ourselves with our in-house team.

Cost and Licensing Advice:

It's quite expensive.

Other Solutions Considered:

If it were like Tomcat, configuring .xml files would take care of some things, but there's not a particular main .xml file available with WebLogic. In fact, there are so many important .xml files that are needed for WebLogic.

Other Advice:

It's highly expensive and there are other much, much better products out for the cost of peanuts.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
ITCS user
Principal Consultant at Rubicon Red
Consultant
It gives you a console for administration, creating resources, managing those resources, troubleshooting, diagnostics, and everything else all in one place.

Valuable Features:

I like that fact that it is the most scalable and the best-of-breed application server for hosting any kind of an application. One of the best things about WebLogic Suite is that the enterprise customers we work with have a broad spectrum of Oracle products that they use, from BPM to E-Business Suite to whatever. One thing common to all of these solutions is the fact that they're all on WebLogic server.

It's multi-tenant, is highly available, and I believe it's the best-in-class application server for Java. Most of Oracle's products are in Java, so they are all supported on WebLogic Server. That is one of the biggest aspects. It's very reliable, it's enterprise-grade, so we get great support from Oracle as well.

Technically, there's absolutely nothing that you cannot get from a WebLogic Server in terms of availability and scalability. It is very easy to maintain, and if you look at other JMX process based servers, they don't give you a great console. But WebLogic Server gives you a console for administration, creating resources, managing those resources, troubleshooting, diagnostics, and everything else all in one place.

Improvements to My Organization:

In an enterprise, a solution is not delivered by a single system but a lot of them. You would often find that to achieve a particular business function, you're using ABS, you're using Server Suite, you're likely using several other solutions. So WebLogic Server provides one common platform for deploying all of these applications, and you don't have to invest in five different application servers for five different applications that you're using. It helps consolidate your systems, especially your middleware servers.

Room for Improvement:

Multi-tenancy is needed. It is starting to come in the latest releases, but it is a very basic multi-tenant feature at the moment. I would like a more enterprise-grade multi-tenancy feature coming into WebLogic. Many organizations use WebLogic for all of their applications, but what we also have to think about is that each application wants to share the platform, and they want some sort of isolation from other tenants or other business units in an organization. How WebLogic addresses that challenge is by having multiple tenants that share the same infrastructure without disturbing each other.

Use of Solution:

I've been using WebLogic since v5.0 to v12.2, where it is right now.

Deployment Issues:

We've had no issues with deployment.

Stability Issues:

Stability is not necessarily dependent upon WebLogic, but it depends upon the type of application that you deploy. It's a common platform where you can put pretty much everything. Most often than not, what we see is a combination of WebLogic and the application that you deploy on top of it which causes stability issues, not just in isolation.

For example, you know that you have Java and that Java has memory leaks. But it's not just Java that's causing memory leaks, it's the application and Java in combination that can cause this problem. The same thing with WebLogic, so it's not just WebLogic alone. It is almost always your application as well as WebLogic Server together that causes a problem. But as a platform, it is very stable.

Scalability Issues:

We can scale it to thousands of users without a problem. We've had no issues at all with scalability.

Initial Setup:

The initial setup is very easy and very straightforward.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partners
ITCS user
Engagement Manager at NEC Australia - Oracle at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Consultant
It's allowed us to contain and administer the WebLogic environment as a managed service. We support and manage our customer environments onsite and remotely by using the web GUI.

Valuable Features

  • The managed server and deployment architecture.
  • Being able to isolate or combine applications at various levels whilst taking advantage of load balancing and clusters.
  • The web interface is fairly easy to use, but for those who want it, the majority of commands can be executed via scripts WLST.
  • Being able to create deployment templates for use on other hosts.

Improvements to My Organization

It's allowed us to contain and administer the WebLogic environment as a managed service. We support and manage our customer environments onsite and remotely by using the web GUI.

Room for Improvement

There is little to improve, but I would say the deployment process could be more user-friendly. Using staging to secure your deployment environment does bring its problems. They are easy to solve but require access to the drive space.

Use of Solution

I've been using it since 2009.

Deployment Issues

We have come across some issues with clustering, but it was the third-party application that needed the change and not WebLogic.

Stability Issues

We have found that on the odd occasion of a host shutdown, the services and Node Manager wouldn’t start the deployments as specified. Manual intervention was required.

Scalability Issues

We've had no issues scaling it for our needs.

Customer Service and Technical Support

It's very good as Oracle support has always been useful. It's a bit painful to fill out all the details and provide all the logs, but it works so I’ll keep using it. The people on the other end are usually very experienced and resolve the issues relatively quickly.

Initial Setup

It's straightforward and easy to install and set up. There is plenty of documentation and online experience to follow and learn from.

Implementation Team

We are the vendor and implement the solution for our customers. My advice would be to get yourself on one of the administration workshops that Oracle provides or self-teach on YouTube. Talk to a partner in your area as they can provide you with workshops and training.

Pricing, Setup Cost and Licensing

Oracles prices/licenses are painful to deal with. Understand the architecture and application requirements up front, i.e. number of users or hardware available.

Other Solutions Considered

WebLogic has been first choice for us numerous times.

Other Advice

If you are unsure about your decision, run a POC with authorization from Oracle through a partner like NEC. Trial and test it for 30 days and see if it meets your requirements. Ensure you have a WebLogic administrator to help guide you through it.

Understand the recommended requirements for the apps and assign the correct memory. This will allow you to achieve a good user experience. The High Availability and high performance provide a solid foundation for application hosting. The apps teams see the benefit and stability when they start using it.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: We have a very good relationship with Oracle and support numerous customers throughout Australia and the world.
it_user418299
Lead Technical Consultant at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Consultant
The cluster configuration and cluster performance are the most valuable features for us.

What is most valuable?

The cluster configuration and cluster performance are the most valuable features for us. In fact, they're better in this most recent version than in previous ones, making it a better solution overall.

What needs improvement?

Transactions monitoring graphics need to be improved. When I need to monitor sample transaction response times or something similar, I need to use third-party tools. I assume that it is possible to see transaction performances on the WebLogic console with some graphics, so I'd like to have that feature.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using WebLogic for 10 years, and v12.1.3 for the last year.

What was my experience with deployment of the solution?

If the packet is bigger than 800MB, then the deployment is very, very difficult with the Weblogic admin console. To make this work, we have to use wlst.sh scripts to deploy.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We have had no issues with the stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

There have been no issues scaling it for our needs.

How are customer service and technical support?

Oracle Support is perfect for their Database, but for WebLogic/CC&B it is not so good, and for that I give it a 6/10.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have used many application servers, and this is the best for performance and for a user-friendly management console.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward.

What about the implementation team?

I have implemented it both through a vendor team and through our in-house team.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Due to the exchange rate, it is expensive for Turkish companies.

What other advice do I have?

It gives good performance, but we still have to use third-party tools for monitoring. You should take that into consideration when deciding whether to purchase it.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
ITCS user
Managing Director at a training & coaching company with 51-200 employees
Vendor
It's especially useful for big data applications if you're using APIs or have geo-spatial data or complex data sets.

Valuable Features

It's a very scalable, extensible, middleware component. It's especially useful for big data applications if you're using APIs or have geo-spatial data or complex data sets. It's also a very affordable and efficient.

Room for Improvement

I would like to see Oracle offer the WebLogic Suite in other areas, like SaaS or PaaS. From what I've seen at Oracle World, they're already moving in that direction, so it gives you a broader portfolio or different ways to leverage their technology.

Deployment Issues

We haven't had any issues with deployment.

Stability Issues

It's very stable. It can handle a lot of database storage and repositories. It's really the backbone of a lot of our systems that we use for our federal customers. It's very smooth and not buggy, and…

Valuable Features

It's a very scalable, extensible, middleware component. It's especially useful for big data applications if you're using APIs or have geo-spatial data or complex data sets.

It's also a very affordable and efficient.

Room for Improvement

I would like to see Oracle offer the WebLogic Suite in other areas, like SaaS or PaaS. From what I've seen at Oracle World, they're already moving in that direction, so it gives you a broader portfolio or different ways to leverage their technology.

Deployment Issues

We haven't had any issues with deployment.

Stability Issues

It's very stable. It can handle a lot of database storage and repositories. It's really the backbone of a lot of our systems that we use for our federal customers. It's very smooth and not buggy, and now that more people are learning how to troubleshoot and work with the product, it's becoming exponentially easier to find quality to support it during the WebLogic application process.

Scalability Issues

Obviously, it works best with Exadata servers, so that's what it really helped us with. We were running WebLogic on servers that weren't optimized for that software. I think we may have had it on IBM Blade and the servers we were using weren't necessarily optimized for the WebLogic tool. Once we kicked in the Exadata server, it increased the time to process.

Customer Service and Technical Support

The level of technical support is very good. The SMEs that are coming to help us have been excellent. It's very easy to get a hold of them and we talk weekly with our account reps to make sure things are going well. They are very approachable and always easy to get hold of, as well as being very knowledgeable.

Other Advice

We just like Oracle products.

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