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WSO2 Carbon [EOL] Competitors and Alternatives

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Read reviews of WSO2 Carbon [EOL] competitors and alternatives

PRINCEWILL OPARA
Head Banking Application Customization and Reporting at a financial services firm with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Good integration capabilities with an easy-to-learn language but is very expensive

Pros and Cons

  • "The stability is mostly pretty good."
  • "Today, the IBM business rule engine, the DataPower is outside the Enterprise Service Bus. It's sold as a different feature or application. If it could be integrated, then it's able to handle a lot more of what we are doing now rather than just have a stateless ESB that you can't do much on, and a set of normal business rules."

What is our primary use case?

We primarily use the solution for integrations of traffic between internal applications, communications, and transactions between various internal applications. We also use it for integration with various external parties.

How has it helped my organization?

Before we implemented IBM to integrate with other external parties, we had buckets of applications to build, and maintenance was difficult, as was support. On top of that, integration wasn't well controlled and managed. Right now, post-implementation of IBM ESB, we have a better structure. We have better teams in development and response to customers. We have an application that is centrally managed and monitored. We have better SOA experience in our development process.

What is most valuable?

The feature we find most useful is the ease of development.

It provides a variable within our application it can easily be used across various applications. 

ESQ is very robust and easy to learn. That's the language the solution is based on. 

The solution can scale.

The stability is mostly pretty good.

What needs improvement?

There are experiences we have on the application, such as latency issues. There are no inherent components for you to throttle and measure the velocity of transactions. For that, you have to get a separate application and set up more robust rules. Then, you can handle API throttling and a number of business logic and rules. You need to implement DataPower, in order to have this. It should have been integrated into a single application rather than having to deal with various applications and components. It would be nice if everything could be packaged under one solution.

Today, the IBM business rule engine, the DataPower is outside the Enterprise Service Bus. It's sold as a different feature or application. If it could be integrated, then it's able to handle a lot more of what we are doing now rather than just have a stateless ESB that you can't do much on, and a set of normal business rules.

If you have the business rule engine that can help us measure velocity, throttle, monetization, et cetera, within the ESB, it would be better than it is now. There won't be any need for one to start looking out for any possible change in the near future.

The initial setup is a bit complex. 

This is a very expensive product.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using the solution for more than five years at this point. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

There is some latency and slowness in the application. At times, we have to restart the server, and there are some errors we can't handle. We send those to IBM. It's relatively stable, however, periodically, we have problems, which is why we have to get IBM to help us resolve them. That said, I would describe the product as stable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

In terms of extensibility to other applications after development, it's highly extensible. The solution can scale. 

We have developers, who develop various integration requirements, and we have support. Outside that, we don't have physical users using it. There are about 10 developers in all, that handle various requirements that come along. The support unit is about five people and they are handling the support.

How are customer service and technical support?

We don't deal with IBM directly. There's a local partner of IBM that assists us. We only have a direct relationship with IBM, when the local partner cannot handle a problem. Our contract is designed with IBM in such a way that we have to go through their local partner. In terms of responsiveness, the local partner is good. I wouldn't say excellent, however, they are good in response time. In terms of timeline for issue resolution, TAT for issue resolution, they are fair.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before we went to IBM, we didn't use a different solution, however, we checked in our industry and we checked how people felt about Microsoft middleware, and they didn't have a good experience. It's not robust, the support wasn't strong, et cetera. Therefore, we chose IBM. We were swayed by how other organizations, including banks in Nigeria, were mostly seeing success with IBM.

We are using WSO2 for some applications, however, we do not rely on it completely as it is open-source and if we run into issues we cannot rely on help from any support.

How was the initial setup?

Setting up the solution is not straightforward. It's difficult and complex. We needed assistance in order to manage the process properly. It's not something you can just pick up, and then, run on your own. You need help from a partner, which involves additional costs.

What about the implementation team?

We didn't do it alone. We worked with IBM, and then, IBM nominated a local partner in Nigeria that worked with us to set this up.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution is very expensive. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at another solution called WSO2. It is a lot easier to set up. It's easier to use, and it's less expensive. However, the challenge we have with that, is that the support is lacking as it is an open-source application. The support is not so strong. That's the only reservation we had for that. Outside that, we are also using it for some other applications as well.

The prominent other contenders were WebLogic from Oracle, and whatever was provided by Microsoft. Among the three then, IBM came out on top in our assessment and rating. However, with the benefit of the insights we now have, if we were to do the same process again, over five years, WSO2 has done so well, and some other middleware is also doing well. Likely we would not choose IBM if we had to choose again.

What other advice do I have?

We are customers and end-users.

I'd rate the solution around a seven out of ten.

I would advise companies to evaluate and consider the options and whether they make sense vis-a-vis the benefit they hope to derive is worth the while. IBM is not cheap. They need to consider costs and make sure they have internal resources available to them. Those using the solution need to be well trained. Otherwise, the company will end up depending on third parties for everything, and that will drive up the costs further. 

I'd also suggest companies implement such a solution early. Load balancing is very critical in our experience. We didn't implement load balancing immediately, and that affected us. As a company is implementing, it should consider load balancing. Rather than invest on the on-prem, a company should consider the cloud. We did on IBM Unix servers on-prem, and that's pretty expensive.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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PaulPerez
Integration Architect at pymma
Real User
Top 5
Enables us to define the business process and integrate it with other software

Pros and Cons

  • "The core is very stable."
  • "The documentation needs to be better."

What is our primary use case?

Our customer is usually a government organization (who works for a confidential employer), and I work with the job center department of the government, the region of the government of Galicia, Spain. They use this product to define services relating to the unemployment problem. For example, training compensation, taxes, how to search for jobs and social security covering for unemployed people. 

Mainly, I define the business process and integrate it with other software, such as Database and Legacy. Then from Java, we publish microservices or web services for the end-user. 

The website is mainly for unemployed people. They connect to the website and use the services through the web interface.

Unfortunately, due to COVID-19, there were a lot of unemployed people so a few million people started using it. It was very interesting to see this product, which is designed for roughly 200,000 people, to handle this dramatic increase in requirements. Millions of people were connecting every month on the system and there were no issues.

What needs improvement?

The documentation needs to be better — maybe they could add more accurate tutorials. However, since I have been working with the product for a long time, it is not a big concern for me, but for the new generation, this could be a problem. Also, the launch took a while, but once we understood the concept of interface services, it became really powerful.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

There are three key components: the development tool, the component and the core. The core is very stable. Sometimes we get bugs on the component, one day the community reported six cases. I find the development tools more annoying than anything. There are some bugs, I don't block them, but they can be annoying. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is very good. Two years ago I worked in the Philippines and we processed one billion messages per day. There were no problems.

How are customer service and technical support?

We have contacted them before. Mainly, when we have a bug we just send it to the community. I know the people at technical support and it's very rare that we get bugs that we are not able to fix. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I used to work with Integration Bus. What is interesting is that the two products were made mainly by the same team, but OpenESB is lighter, you can run it on a simple GBM. It's lighter and has quite a few resources, no application server, and no database. This provides you with more intelligence because there is some kind of friction in the routing service, and you can play with that friction to provide some connection policy, like the last deployed policy. For example, if you were to install version one, and afterward, you deployed version two, automatically — if you decided that your connection will be the right deployed connection — you would be routed to the last version. If it doesn't work, you would just need to redeploy version one.

Also, there are higher-level concepts, such as the interface of services, which allows you to define your interface and choose the method of implementation, like Java for example. On the other hand, with OpenESB, I am more connected. At the monitoring level, you can trust the level and replay the process, which is interesting, but because you have to store everything on the database, you have a conventional system that makes your system require more resources.

The push ability to extract data from the process and then publish it in the data container is very interesting. For example, by using a database like Google's big data analytic search, you can create your own analytics from the data in your process without disturbing the process. 

How was the initial setup?

You can install OpenESB in less than an hour. It's very light, with only three to four components to install. I think one hour maximum is all you need to install OpenESB; however, I am not talking about deployment on the cloud or under which instances you choose to run it. When you install it, you also have to install three or four libraries but I think they have issued a new version that starts automatically within the pre-install version, and that one can run directly.

You don't need to be a technical person to install OpenEBS. There is nothing to do, it's all graphical. You do it through a console, but the person who is installing it must understand what they are doing. In most cases, you just have to deploy two libraries and some components. So, you don't need to be a technical person to install it, but you do to run it. 

The deployment of the application takes only five minutes. As it is unzipping, just set up the Java and that's it.

We do our own maintenance. Right now, we have four people that do it; however, when certain components need maintenance, such as the HS7 component, different people maintain it. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

There are two versions. The first is the community version, which is free and contains the last part of the feature, but if you want to get the Enterprise version, you'll have to pay €60,000 which covers support and two instances on production.

To clarify, with Enterprise, you're not paying for the license, you just pay for the support and you get the right to use the Enterprise version.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We evaluated three products in total: OpenESB, Oracle, and WSO2. Oracle was too easy and too expensive and WSO2 didn't support it because we wanted to have a simple process. We need a VPN antenna. 

What other advice do I have?

I know the product well, the community has been managing the product for the last 10 years. Because the product comes from Sun Microsystems, it has been given to the community.They have made some improvements during the past years and now the product is lighter, it's very nice.

If you're interested in using OpenESB, I would advise you to contact the people of the community because it's a good tool to get information on OpenEBS. They will provide you with tutorials, additional documentation and they reply. So, connect to the community for support because if you try to do it alone, OpenESB can be quite tricky. 

I would give OpenESB a rating of eight to nine out of 10. I am not giving them a 10 because there are too many faults in regards to documentation. 

Every part of the product is documented, but finding the right one is difficult. Documentation is the main reason why you should contact the community, I think it's the most important reason. There is a special forum in the community to discuss this issue, but you'll have to find them.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
Get our free report covering , and other competitors of WSO2 Carbon [EOL]. Updated: September 2021.
540,884 professionals have used our research since 2012.