2018-10-28T08:38:00Z

What advice do you have for others considering LogRhythm NextGen SIEM?


If you were talking to someone whose organization is considering LogRhythm NextGen SIEM, what would you say?

How would you rate it and why? Any other tips or advice?

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3737 Answers

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Top 5LeaderboardReal User

Honestly, I don't like this solution so much. I'm actually a Splunk Certified Architect and so I know Splunk pretty well, and when I compare them, I really don't like this product. The best advice that I can give is not to install this product unless you have a use case that matches its capabilities. The use case for this product, the LogRhythm SIEM, is in a regulatory environment such as HIPAA, SOC, PCI, or banking. These are heavily audited environments where you have precise requirements for reporting. They have pre-configured lots of different types of inputs but it's a very rigid environment. You can only collect information from certain types of sources and it's very complex as to how to instruct the product to obtain a certain type of log message. Once you configure a new log message source, you'll have to go on to the LogRhythm platform and conduct a variety of clicks and actions to vet or verify that log source and allow LogRhythm to start collecting logs. Not only that, but there's one more annoying thing. I'd say for these highly audited environments, regulatory environments that I mentioned, they have many, many pre-configured reports. So, it's designed very rigidly. In other words, they have done a lot of work in pre-identifying what the fields are in every type of log message. If you're getting log messages from Active Directory or the firewall then they know exactly what every field is. But, they have their own particular naming convention for fields and with the rigidity, you can't change that so easily. I'm in the networking team and we're using it to monitor log messages from our networking equipment. For that, it's not such a good product. For example, consider a jet engine with a lot of sensors such as temperature, pressure, rotational speed, wind speed, fuel flow, etc, they have lots and lots of sensors in them that are all connected by ethernet. If you want to use Splunk to monitor a jet engine you can do it, easily. Forget about doing with LogRhythm, that's not happening. The bottom line is that for highly regulated industries it may work well, but you cannot use LogRhythm to monitor equipment. You also have to make sure that everybody who uses the product has full training and certification. If you're not willing to commit to the full training then don't even consider it. I would rate this solution a five out of ten.

2019-05-09T13:12:00Z
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Real User

I would rate it a six and a half out of ten. Sometimes I have to rerun scans and look into why the scan didn't complete and why it crashed. All of that stuff has to do with the initial set up. For the most part, it does what we want, but there can definitely be improvement. I would advise someone considering this solution to look beyond LogRhythm. LogRhythm is one of the top solutions. I would say Splunk is overrated. Look into IBM QRadar and then McAfee as well.

2019-03-24T08:52:00Z
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Real User

I would probably rate it as an eight or a nine, currently, mainly, probably due to the complexity of importing log sources that aren't natively supported.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

If I had to rate LogRhythm and CloudAI out of 10, I think I'd give it an eight. There's still room for LogRhythm to improve, and they've laid out a pretty great roadmap for what they want to do in the future. I think if they continued to innovate and continue to implement the things that they've talked about, that they'll continue to grow in my eyes. There is some room for improvement, but overall, if you want a very solid platform with stability and scalability, LogRhythm is definitely the way to go.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

I would rate this product an eight out of ten, just because there's always room for improvement and there's always room we can work on. So there's always benefits, but it's been really good with what we needed and it's been very stable for our implementation. My advice to somebody who's looking to stand-up a SIEM solution is to do your research, look at the white papers, look at their documentation they have available on how other people have responded and how many people have stood it up on their own. Get this information and then start playing with it before you start doing implementation. Gives you a lot of foundation and makes the implementation part a lot easier.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

LogRhythm gives us the ability to automate. We do have some smart response plugins that we're using. Unfortunately with healthcare you end up using more contextual smart response plugins then you do actionable ones. I can't go and shut down a system 'cause unless I have absolute 100 percent confidence in the fact that it's not actually touching a person because a biomed is a computerized medical device that connects to a person. So in our environment with a half dozen hospitals, 130 clinics. We can't just go around shutting things down or even necessarily quarantining them because it might be a client server type of situation where we can't interrupt this if maybe they're giving a radiation treatment to someone. We have a lot of different enclaves and things. But LogRhythm allows me to see things that I may want to take action on via a human resource. I can send a desktop tech out there to make sure that whatever it is I'm concerned about is not in fact taking place. If I had to rate LogRhythm I would say I give it an eight out of ten. I think that I like the direction that they're going as a company. I like their philosophy and their milestones that they lay out at these conferences. I do like them also from a product standpoint because some of the competitors are just not, they're price prohibitive as far as volume especially when you look at SIEM tools like Splunk. Small shops can afford Splunk, but big shops you got to really need Splunk to really afford it. The same with Qradar that's what we had previously where we were at and they just became price prohibitive. So I like LogRhythm, they have the full package. I like where they're going with network monitor. I like the UEBA stuff. We're not currently using that. I like the playbook integration. It seems like they're really thoughtfully maturing their product line and I think that gives me confidence for even if I have a pain point now they're going to address that going forward.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Real User

We do have quite a few log sources. Currently we've got around 30 or 40 completely different kinds of log sources and roughly six or 7,000 different devices currently reporting in. We set it around 20,000 events per second sustained for our new infrastructure. That's kind of a lot for us. We've gotten that up relatively quick, up and running. So the stability for that has been great. And as far as parsing goes, we have generally stuck to platforms that we know would parse out of the box. And now, we're just starting to get our feet wet with, okay, what are some platforms where maybe it doesn't have out of the box support for the parsing messages" Or we might want to write our own parser or something along those lines. We know that it supports things like common event format. And so generally, I'm pretty confident that we'll be able to get everything in there that we want. I wish we had that information. Unfortunately we don't have mean time to detect or any of those soft things. Prior to LogRhythm, it wasn't even an option for us to get those sorts of things. Now with playbooks coming out and some of the new tagging features and case management features that are going to be in seven point four for LogRhythm, that's our first target is to start actually putting numbers around that. And we just haven't had LogRhythm in house long enough to stand up a program around getting those metrics. As far as the rest of 2018 and 2019 goes, that's one of our number one goals is to get those metrics in place. And certainly, the case management features and seven four are what we're looking to get us there. I can tell you for sure that that saves at least an hour of analyst time every single time that occurs and that might happen three or four times a day even for just potentially unwanted software and things like that. So we know that we're saving a lot of time. I have no idea how much exactly we're saving just yet, but I know it's going to be a lot more in the future because we're really starting to get sped up with smart response options and automation, especially when it comes to playbooks. So we'll see a lot of that in the future and that's another one of the big reasons that we've looked to LogRhythm to say, "Okay, we know that we still have yet to see some of what we've invested in here, but we're confident that we're seeing it already." I give it a nine out of ten right now. The only only minus being for documentation, that's it. But I think that they can get there. So I have faith in them. The advice I would give to somebody looking for a new SIEM or to invest in SIEM technology would be obviously they have to keep in mind the price. We always have to work within that constraint. As a technology person, I hate to think from that perspective, but it's our reality and so things like Splunk really work against that in terms of being able to have to pay for ingestion of data. LogRhythm is great in that area. And that's one of the reasons why we've definitely looked towards LogRhythm for that. A couple of the other things that I look at for them is automation capabilities and API's. Everything these days has to have an API. So how good is your SIEMs API? And LogRhythm definitely seems committed to continuing developing their API out, particularly with playbooks and automation. And so, generally, I'm going to say that's where you should be looking for SIEM right now is automation. Most of the SIEM software solutions can do 99 percent of what's out there. Can It parse a message? Can it store it? Can it index it? All of those things, they all generally check that box somewhere along the lines. But how closes is that ecosystem? How available is the API? How good is the support gonna be and things like that, that not necessarily every SIEM does equally? I would say that's where they need to look to find their value.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

So, we are in the current five-year security maturity program. We're on year one, and LogRhythm is gonna be the center point for the first two years in terms of aggregating all the different log source types within the organization. We still find that there are log source types that are not coming in, which we plan to integrate within LogRhythm and use its analytics tools to help us get more mature and establish us forward in maturity of our security for the industry. I rate LogRhythm 10. It's very easy to use. It's very user friendly. The product is very innovative with SmartResponse and AI Engine, so it takes half the work from myself and my analysts, so I love that product for that reason.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Real User

On a scale of one to ten, I rate LogRhythm as a nine because it is a wonderful tool that definitely helps with identifying different threats within the organization. I would definitely recommend this tool. It's a very, I would say beasty application, you always will be on top of things when it comes to LogRhythm because it's always changing, but that's a good thing because the environment, the threat environment is always changing. So I'd definitely highly recommend it. The target I would give to an individual that's looking for the best SIEM tools to put in their environment would be definitely look at one that's growing, that's not stagnant and LogRhythm is definitely one of those too that look for ways to improve it, user friendly and the different things that's out there in the environment to be able to catch the types of the bad guys or the different threats. They always try to stay on top of things. So I definitely recommend LogRhythm in that case.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

I'm going to give them an eight. It's a fantastic solution and I totally support what they're doing and I like where it's going. But there is room for improvement, and there are some pain points and honestly I've had a rough year. That kind of influences it too. It's been a lot of time on the phone with support this year. I will tell them what I wished I have known the day I started onboarding logs, and that is when you're looking for a SIEM, put all the features and everything to the side. Go talk to your business people and find out what's important to them because that's how you're going to know what to bring on initially. And once you know those things that are critical and the things you have to do, then you can evaluate the different solutions to see who has the native support because we didn't do that. We bought it simply because it was awesome and fast and less expensive than Splunk. And then I onboarded 1,500 log sources in a week and brought the system to its knees. And I'm even now today still cleaning up and removing log sources that just bring no value. It's just noise. Take the time and plan that out before you even go talk to vendors. Figure out what logs are out there, which ones are meaningful to you and the business and then find the solution that fits best with that.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

On average, I process around 1200 messages per second. So measurable results for mean time to detect and mean time to respond. I don't have measurable results because there wasn't anything there beforehand. But now, we've responded within hours to events that could have been breach incidents, or in some cases within minutes and stopping attacks in their tracks. My security program's maturity is still in its infancy. I'm basically starting it from scratch. LogRhythm has been a major step with giving me file integrity monitoring, the SIEM capabilities, log collection, a lot of things that we didn't have before. User behavior has been amazing for helping me keep track of what's going on in my network. So it's been a major stepping stone. It's the first in many. I would rate LogRhythm as an eight out of ten because of the compliance factor. The modules for compliance are fantastic. The UEBA and CloudAI are solid for user behavior, and the SIEM itself is very powerful. I work very heavily in the customization aspect of it. Writing my own alarms, my own rules to try and track down events and alarms, stuff going on inside of my network. My only complaint really is just the lack of API support and how much work it takes to bring in cloud. That definitely needs some work. And just the time to set up is very time-intensive. If I had a friend or a colleague that was looking to implement a SIEM, I would definitely recommend LogRhythm, and I would pretty much give them the same answers that I gave here where cloud support is still growing, but the tools that it has are very powerful. The behavior analytics are fantastic. It definitely would have to be on their list at least to look at.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

I would rate LogRhythm a nine out of 10, primarily because of the current functionality within the system and the direction that the company is going. I feel it's appropriately aligned with security today and being prepared for tomorrow.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

I'd give LogRhythm a nine out of ten because of the ease of use, especially as an analyst, being able to twist and turn all that data, drill down on it, really get an easy understand of what's going on in the environment. From the administration side as well, it's a lot easier to use than other products that I've had and it has all the built in knowledge, whereas with some tools you dump all your data into it and it's up to you to do that classification and indexing and understanding of that data, where the value that LogRhythm's gonna provide for you is that prebuilt classification for all the data sources in your environment. If I had a friend that was looking to implement a new SIEM solution, I would have them understand what log sources they're trying to bring into their SIEM solution and make sure that the one they chose supported those log sources. On top of that, understand your use cases that you're gonna use this SIEM for, have those ready in hand and be ready to start billing those out as you get that data in the environment.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

I would say LogRhythm, on a scale of 1 to 10, it'd be a nine. I think it's a really solid solution. I think one of the things that they could probably improve on, as I mentioned, was being kind of a little more proactive when it comes to things like cloud and things like that, so I think that they are getting better, but I'd say a nine right now.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

If I had to rate LogRhythm on a scale of one to 10, I would probably give it a solid eight.

2018-11-22T09:50:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

My advice: * Get a SIEM. * Which SIEM I would suggest really depends on what your key use cases are. There are other SIEMs that do other things better. As an example, Splunk brings in logs wonderfully. But if you're not going to hire a Hadoop engineer who absolutely specializes in it, you're going to bring in a lot of logs that you're not going to be able to do anything with. You really have to look at everything that every piece does. In terms of the full-spectrum analytics capabilities, we're not using NetMon, we're not using FIM. We're just collecting logs from every device that we can collect them from. I'm in the process of onboarding hundreds of application logs. We feed them all to our SOC and Instant Response and Compliance teams. Playbooks, for me, are "N/A." I have an associate that handles all the analytics and reporting and alerting. I'm more of the architect. We have somewhere around 90,000 log sources. Do remember that Windows takes three log sources each. We're running about 5.5 billion logs a day. We're running a sustained 55,000 logs per second. Our database is somewhere in the neighborhood of 4.5 terabytes in size, over two tables. It's a large installation. When it comes to our security program maturity, we have built a very strong security team. Since LogRhythm was implemented, the team has exploded, not only because of LogRhythm. We're now implementing many other vendors, cloud and other things. For deployment and maintenance of the solution, we have three staff. That being said, being Marsh & McLennan Companies, we're running a very big installation where we have several teams that have input. This is my first time being part of that kind of team. I've been in SIEM for 15 years, but until now, every time I've ever done it, I've been the sole "SIEM guy," the one who handled everything. But now, I'm an architect. We have a SIEM analyst. I work directly with one of the heads of the server teams, so when we need to do upgrades we use that team. We also have a SOC, we have an IR team, all in-house. We have a lot of teams that have input into the SIEM. When selecting a vendor, the most important thing to me is that the product does what it says it's going to do; that and the support. I've worked with many other SIEMs. I was Professional Services for ArcSight for a year-and-a-half. I've worked with enVision, I've worked with RSA Security Analytics. We were their first customer when they rolled out the analytics and it took a year to get through all the bugs. There are some things that some of the other pieces do better. There are some things that I think that LogRhythm has missed. But all in all, it's one of the best SIEMs, as a total package, that I've worked with. When I hit an issue, the support teams and other teams are there to help. Because my installation is not stable, I rate the solution at six out of ten. Once I become stable it will be a nine.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

The capabilities of playbooks is in 7.4, which we are not able to utilize yet. Therefore, we have built outside of the solution playbooks. However, we are looking forward to the integration of playbooks in 7.4, or even version 8. We were shown today a couple of things where playbooks will be enhanced, even having SMARTResponse coming right out of the playbooks, so hopefully advanced SOAR capabilities. We run two independent LogRhythms. On one, we have about 33,000 different log sources, which include endpoints and now IoT devices. On the other, we have a very small footprint. It somewhere around 3000 log sources. On one of my LogRhythms, I have a message per second around 2400 to 2500. That spikes depending on the time of day. Sometimes, it goes up to 17,000. On average, it comes back down to about 2300. On the other LogRhythm, there are very few messages per second. It is around 600. Do your homework first. See what pie in the sky solution is supposed to be for your SIEM. Do not just check a box. LogRhythm will more than likely suit your needs.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

Definitely consider LogRhythm. There are a lot of players in the market, but LogRhythm is a solid solution. We don't have the playbooks. They are on version 7.4. We just upgraded to version 7.3.4. We are going to wait before we upgrade again due to performance issues. We have around 22,000 log sources and average 5000 messages per second.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

Make sure you size the appliance correctly. We use Ansible and Terraform for infrastructure, so the same concept as the playbooks. We are looking to use the playbooks going forward. We have about 1500 log sources. We do about a 25 million logs a day. Obviously, they're not all events.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

Figure out what you need it for before just getting everything you can into it. That's probably the main thing. We recently brought in an external firewall and it has everything enabled. So make sure it can do what you want and don't try to do more than what you need. We have made a few playbooks, but we haven't done too much with them yet. For deployment and maintenance of the solution, it's just me doing the administration. We're at 60 or 70 log sources right now. With some of the newer ones, we've had to open up tickets for them, like the newer Cisco Wireless. We've had issues with Windows Firewall and AdBlocker. We've had to get those fixed. We process about 600 messages per second. In terms of the maturity of our security program, we got this solution right after we started up, so it has been growing with us. We're now at a point where we're happy with it and getting good value out of it.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

Everyone needs a SIEM. Go with LogRhythm. We are not using the full-spectrum analytic capabilities yet, as we are brand new. We have not used any of the playbooks. We do have them. We find them to be very detailed and organized. We just need to find a way to implement them. I run in about 45 log sources with 12 of them being domain controllers, aka DNS. Messages per second are fluctuating between 3000 and 9000. We are still trying to figure out why. We think it is our very chatty domain controllers, as we do deal with the Hard Rock and Seminole tribe, but I would say that we average about 5000. Most important criteria when selecting a vendor: customer service. Do they care about our business as much as we care about our business? Also know as, do they care about our data as much as we care about our data?

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Top 5LeaderboardReal User

I'd highly recommend going with the product. Our security program is pretty much in its infancy. We're always looking to improve things. Just as IT, in general, constantly changes on a daily basis, LogRhythm is always evolving and coming out with different things, helping with innovation. It's been great. Right now we have roughly 70 to 80 different log sources. We have about 5,000 to 6,000 events per second, and we're looking at expanding that. I rate it at eight out of ten. It's up there, top-of-the-line, but just like with any other application or program, as you grow, there are going to be some small hiccups. They're very minor.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Top 5LeaderboardReal User

Know what you want it to do. If you buy a SIEM because its called a SIEM or someone says it's a SIEM, you're gonna end up with what someone else believes they need. Figure out what you need beforehand and make sure that those bullet points are covered because there are a lot of options. We're currently using the built-in manual playbooks. So far, the features are very good. They are growing. I am looking forward to seeing how they expand upon it. The automation is coming. The API access and everything else we're looking for to be able to deeply automate a lot of common tasks is still being built-in. Right now, we can do automation on simple tasks. E.g., if it sees something bad, it can take it off the network and put it in our remediation subnet. However, it does not have the capability for complex investigative actions yet. Right now, we have about 3000 log sources and 3000 messages per second.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

We do not use any of the playbooks currently. We'd definitely like to. It's a feature that we're planning to implement pretty soon. Regarding our log sources, it's in the high hundreds, probably not in the thousands. When it comes to messages per second that we are processing, looking at the average, we're at about 1,000, but we peak somewhere north of 1,500. I rate the solution an eight out of ten. It's a great platform, but I don't want to give them too much confidence, there's always room to improve.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

I'm not sure that we're hands-on yet with the full-spectrum analytics capabilities and we don't use any of the built-in playbooks. We have plans to use them in the future. We want to integrate everything into it and make it more automated. We're at about 6,000 logs per second. In terms of a measurable decrease in the meantime to detect and respond to threats, we haven't gotten there yet. We are still implementing, still learning. We have to get to all our logs correlated. So far we're pretty happy with the overall functionality of the system. It's going to meet everything we're looking for.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

It helps that the product is fully realized and ready to go as soon as you get it installed. You can immediately see results and immediately see the data coming in. You're able to collate and correlate it, obtaining your data in a quick and easy manner. Do a demo. See what they're offering. Just know that their support is the best. I haven't used any of the automated playbooks yet. Our engineers are leery about having the automatic stuff go off, which I can understand. We also have separation of duties. I don't have a lot of their credentials to work with it on my own, so we would have to go back and forth with the engineers, and that is something that they don't really want to do. However, we do have our own playbooks and security team, but it's more manual. I am interested in the playbooks feature, so I will attend one of the events here to learn more about it and figure it out, then take it back to the team to get buy in on it, so we can then use it. We have about 2500 log sources sending logs to LogRhythm right now. We have about 20 firewalls, with a lot of Windows PCs. It's the best solution that I've ever used. We're expanding its use, not only in our corporate network, but out to the cloud environment where we host customer data stuff, too.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

While we are aware of the playbooks, we still need to look into them. We are close to a gig of messages a second, so quite a bit of data. To capture your use cases, understand exactly what you are looking at ingesting. Do the research as far as what the company has done. For example: * What have they provided at organizations of similar size? * At peer organizations, how have they implemented the solution and what are some of their pain points? Understand what everybody else has done previously with the solution.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

It's been pretty great. For us, the use case is all about generating actionable alerts and alarms and seeing how much we can reduce manual operations, so that's what I would compare: time saved. We don't use the full-spectrum analytics capabilities. In terms of playbooks, we're still on 7.26 so we don't have the playbooks yet, but we're upgrading as a high priority right now. For deployment and maintenance of the solution, we use two staff members. In terms of log sources, we have a couple of thousand and our MPS is 3,800. When selecting a vendor, what's important for us is support. Support is huge.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

I am rating the solution a six out of ten, because we have not gotten it to work yet. With all its components, there is such a learning curve. I haven't gotten far enough along in the process to know if the solution has a shortcoming or if it is our shortcoming with somehow getting it dialed in.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

Our security program is not real mature. The security group just got a CISO within the last year or two, so that has been the focus. The company is bringing up that side of the business. They recognize that it is something that needs to be invested in, along with their investment in LogRhythm. I don't have playbooks right now. We are still on 7.2. I don't think playbooks are in there yet. It makes sense that we use that functionality, and we're looking to go to 7.4 as soon as the .3 release comes out. We have about 1800 log sources. We are right at 5000 messages per second, and the system is scaled for 10,000.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

I would recommend LogRhythm. I am really impressed with it, though we haven't start using it yet. We are just in the middle of deployment of the full-spectrum analytics capabilities. We haven't finished the configuration of the product yet. We do plan to use the built-in playbooks. We have approximately 931 log sources at this point. Most important criteria when selecting a vendor: * The reputation of the vendor. * The quality of the product. * The integration into the environment that we have right now.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

I love the potential of this solution. It sounds like a "set it and forget" type of solution. Let it deal with all the problems. It is good at doing that. On the day-to-day, I haven't had a huge amount of time to work with the full-spectrum analytics. I have been focusing on getting it updated and up-and-running. Currently, we have a Windows agent. Therefore, we technically have just two log sources, because the Windows agent is picking up all the domain logs onto one box and forwarding them on. It is taking all the Windows Servers and single-sourcing them. Then, currently, the only other thing that we have actively logging is our Sonic logs and CIS logs. We only have two individual sources listed, but it is more logs than that.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

I would definitely recommend LogRhythm. Work with the LogRhythm team to help learn how your environment works. Use as much help as LogRhythm can provide in your initial setup, so you can understand your environment best. We have more than 20 log sources. We average around 3,000 messages per second. We have hit 8,000 in the past, but not since the new upgrade in which we got more room. In terms of staff for deployment and maintenance, there are just two of us who share it. But when we're on-call, all of us use it. There are nine of us who use it every day when on-call. I rate the solution at seven out of ten. I'm very happy with it. I love how powerful it is. However, the customer service is where the points come off. I know they're working on it.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
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Top 5LeaderboardReal User

I would definitely recommend LogRhythm, based on my experience with it. LogRhythm is always trying to change and improve its product which is always a good thing. Other SIEMS are in development to upgrade and better their SIEMs but LogRhythm, across the board, has a great team. They look an inch deep but a mile wide, whereas other companies will look a mile deep and an inch wide. I think it's a lot better to do "across the horizon," instead of a small, six-foot-deep hole. We are not using the full-spectrum analytics capabilities at this time. We are thinking about it, but there's a process for getting those changes into our baseline, being a development program. We have no playbooks at this time. We have about 5,000 to 7,000 log sources per environment and there are 20 environments. In terms of logs per second, it all depends. We're in development. Some of our environments are not ramped up and they're all at different stages of development. Where we only get 100,000 to 150,0000 logs a day in some environments, in others we'll get close to 1 billion logs a day. When it comes to what's important in selecting a vendor, price, names, and support are all great and dandy. Obviously, the big names of the world have a track record. LogRhythm hasn't been huge for a lot of time but they're starting to grow. They were one of the ones recommended by industry reviews in the SIEM world, but they were a relatively small company at the time. When you have industry reviewers recommending a small company, it says a lot for that small company. I know that they are growing now, but back when LogRhythm was first talked about by the industry they weren't very big, compared to the Arclights and IBMs of the world. I rate it an eight out of ten because I don't have a lot of experience across the board with different SIEMs. I've worked with ArcSight but ArcSight is very expensive. And I've worked a little bit with QRadar. I actually like QRadar as much as LogRhythm.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
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Real User

I just found out about the playbooks at the conference. I plan on using them as soon as I get back. We have about 2500 messages per second coming in.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

My advice would be to definitely look into it. I've used other SIEMs that were a whole lot easier to program and I've used other SIEMs that were vastly oversold and cost way too much money. LogRhythm is a good product for what it is. We have more than 500 and less than 1,000 log sources. In terms of messages per second, therein lies the rub. We bounce anywhere from 2,500 to, on certain days, a peak of over 12,000. We are not using the full-spectrum analytics features. We don't use any automated playbooks. In terms of the number of staff for deployment and maintenance, the latter is me. I've got two other analysts that work with me. Regarding our security program maturity, we've grown a whole lot in the last three years. LogRhythm, fortunately, was a part of that. Our previous SIEM had to be rebooted two or three times a day. Unfortunately, now that we're trying to leverage it to get more data out of it, we don't seem to to be able to do that. I can't say I have seen any measurable decrease in the meantime to detect and respond to threats because I can't watch it all the time.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
author avatar
Real User

From a performance standpoint, I have no problems recommending LogRhythm because it allows me to get in under the hood and tweak some things. It also comes with stuff out-of-the-box that is usable. I think it's a good product. Things like this RhythmWorld 2018 User Conference help me understand the company's philosophy and intentions and its roadmap, which gives me a little more confidence in the product as well. Regarding playbooks, we have Demisto which is a security orchestration automation tool, and we're on LogRhythm 7.3. Version 7.4 is not available yet because of the Microsoft patch that took it down. We're looking to go to 7.4 in our test environment and to deploy up to that. I'm not quite sure how its automation, or the playbook piece, will compare with Demisto, which is primarily built around that area and is a mature product. However, from a price point, it is probably going to be very competitive. In terms of the full-spectrum analytics, some of the visualizations that we have available via the web console are, as others have expressed, short-lived, since they're just a snapshot in time. Whereas, deploying Kibana will, perhaps, give us a trend over time, which we also find to be valuable. We're exploiting what is native to the product, but we're looking to improve that with either going with the Kibana or the ELK Stack to enrich our visualizations and depict greater time periods. We have somewhere north of 22,000 log sources and we average a little over 12,000 messages per second. The staff for deployment and maintenance is myself - I'm the primary owner of this product - and I have one guy as a backup. The rest of my team will use it in an analysis role. However, they're owning and managing other products. It's a very hectic environment. We're probably short a few FTEs. One thing that we've yet to implement very well is the use of cases and metrics. Because oftentimes, if we see something that we know - we glance at it, it's a false positive - we're not going to make a case out of it. We might not close it for a day or two because we know it's nothing, and because we're busy with other things since we are a little bit short on staff. In terms of our security program maturity we have a fairly mature environment with a lot of in-depth coverage. The biggest plus of LogRhythm is that we can custom-write the rules based on the logs and then speed up time to awareness, the meantime to detect. I can create an alarm for virtually anything I can log.

2018-10-28T08:38:00Z
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