2019-02-07T12:28:00Z

What advice do you have for others considering Netsurion EventTracker?


If you were talking to someone whose organization is considering Netsurion EventTracker, what would you say?

How would you rate it and why? Any other tips or advice?

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1010 Answers

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Top 5Real User

The biggest lesson really isn't an EventTracker lesson, it's more of a SIEM lesson. And that lesson is: It's a lot of data. When you have a lot of data, it's going to take a while to study and learn that data, so you can react appropriately. Not all data is actionable. Be prepared for the data. Be prepared to know what you didn't know before. And be prepared to weed out the noise from the actual data. That's where EventTracker's SIEMphonic becomes very helpful. My advice would be, if you're going to go with EventTracker, to go with the SIEMphonic service and leverage their support team to get your knowledge up to speed. So far, our experience with their support has been top-notch. In terms of how we view EventTracker, we're typically just in a browser, so it's on whatever our standard is. I've got a couple of 20-inch monitors on my desk. It's sleek enough that it will work on a normal 15-inch laptop screen too. I have not looked at it on mobile yet, given the fact that it's an on-premise service. If I'm in the building, getting VPN'ed in across my phone is a little tough. But that would be the next iteration of the product, if we would decide to push up towards the cloud instead of being on-prem. We would definitely be looking for some sort of a mobile or a tablet-based mobile interface. We have not integrated EventTracker with other products. Our service-desk tool is a tool called Samanage, which was recently acquired by SolarWinds and has been renamed Solar Winds Service Desk. We have not integrated anything with that since SolarWinds acquired it, because we wanted to see what SolarWinds was going to do with it. Integrating it into EventTracker is on the list. We'll do it if it makes sense. I never rate anything a 10 out of 10, because nothing is ever perfect. But this solution would be at the upper end of that range. This partnership with EventTracker has been one of our better ones.

2019-12-23T07:05:00Z
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Top 10Real User

It's a simple product. It's a lot easier to implement and deploy than the other SIEMs I've used throughout my career. The advice would be that using it is a good decision. There's no reason to shy away from the product. From an event-alert perspective, we haven't used them for that purpose yet. That's largely because the current security services we have in place from our vendors, CrowdStrike in particular, provide us a managed event system from the AV side. They proactively manage our antivirus that's on all of our machines and they also proactively remediate the machines. So we haven't felt the need, yet, to take part in EventTracker's alerting of detected cross-events. That will come in this upcoming calendar year. Our program here is only two years old. The security program itself was only in existence for about nine months before we started to engage with EventTracker, and deployment was earlier this year. We're still really in deployment mode. We haven't integrated EventTracker with any other solutions. We use ServiceNow but we have not made any effort to integrate it. Our roadmap for ServiceNow is to do exactly that and take advantage of that integration capability and have it issue either alert tickets or work requests into ServiceNow for us, so that we don't have to do those manual steps. We are probably a year away from that. There are two others besides me using it in our organization. They're both security analysts. There really isn't any maintenance. We've occasionally had servers that stopped talking for whatever reason but a reboot took care of that. Generally, what we're finding is it's due to an application memory leak on that server. But it's just working. There is no effort there. I would rate it a 10 out of 10. The ease of deployment, the support that we receive from them, the dashboard console which I find to be very helpful, are all part of that rating. I would like to see some more assistance in the way that searches are built, but as I've learned how to search, it's getting easier and easier. Overall, it's a well-priced and functionally appropriate SIEM.

2019-12-23T07:05:00Z
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Top 5Real User

My advice is to get your PO out and make a purchase. I have referred several other companies. I'm involved in several security organizations and it really is one of these diamonds in the rough. I know they have US sales but I think they're a lot stronger over in Europe. I think they're a little-known, hidden secret in the U.S. I know they're in the industry review reports, but I don't think they get the press and the prestige that they should, because they have a really excellent product. Of course, certain government organizations can't do business with support overseas; there can be limitations. But I'm definitely an evangelist for them. We really like their product and plan to keep it for a long time, provided, pricing-wise, it doesn't get out of hand. But I think we've reached a good agreement that we can all live with. We definitely feel like we're getting value for it. We have no problem writing the check every year. This is the first time I've really worked, on a regular basis, with an overseas-support vendor. The biggest thing was getting our support hours lined up. I don't want to sound like I'm dissing them, that if we were in a world of hurt and had something that really had to be taken care of that they wouldn't respond to that. But we had to adjust our workflows knowing that, if we really need to get them on the phone, our morning is the best time to do that. Other than that, the convenience of it, being able to think of how else we can use it and what other kinds of data we could send to EventTracker to help us out, has been instructive. For example, we have a mail product called Proofpoint that actually front ends our email and pulls out spam emails and those sorts of things. We were able to send the over the logs from that and look for any emails that were going to more than a hundred recipients. And EventTracker could give us real-time alerts and that would often tell us if an account was compromised. So there are unique ways like that to think about using it. What are some of the data of things we're trying to track down that we could send over to EventTracker and have them alert us in real-time so we don't have to run a rapport or figure out, three days later, that something went on? We can find out right in the heat of the battle what we need to do. EventTracker's dashboard is probably good. I don't log into the console every day and I don't use it operationally, in the way some people would if they didn't have those managed services. So dashboard-wise, I don't use it as much. I do use their intrusions worldwide map from time-to-time, but beyond that, because I don't get into the console on a regular basis, it's not as useful to me. But I feel like the console would be very powerful with the widgets they can add to it. They've demoed it for me but it's just not the way my workflow is. I usually view EventTracker on just a single, 23-inch Windows screen. I don't have any real-time thing running all the time. I strictly use it on a desktop. In terms of deployment and maintenance of the solution, we don't have anybody additional here. There was a CISO that I replaced and everything else was from the managed service side. We do have one system engineer here who maintains the box, the virtual server that it runs on. But that is a part-time responsibility. He really hasn't had to get involved since I've been here. So there has really been no additional staff. It was just an additional tool that was put into the environment and one that is a tremendous asset for us. There are four individuals besides me who use it and they're all in the server admin group. Version 9 was a tremendous step forward for them. I don't know how long they developed that one, but they really took the right direction with the product. Overall, we're really thrilled with them. If I didn't have the managed services — and it wouldn't be the product's fault — I wouldn't be as thrilled with them. But that service really takes a lot off my plate and frees me up to be able to do the other things I need to do in the organization.

2019-12-22T06:32:00Z
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Top 10Real User

I would rate the product as a seven (out of 10). We don't use the dashboard widgets, but we are planning on it.

2019-11-28T06:07:00Z
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Real User

Overall, it's very straightforward.

2019-09-10T09:04:00Z
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Real User

They are a fantastic team. I would stack them up against anybody. If anybody asks us what we're using for a SIEM, I'd say that this is what we're using. I highly recommend them. Stack it up against some of the other products out there. At the very least, know what you're looking for. Or, if you don't, throw it back at EventTracker and say, "We're looking to do this, can your product do it?" Let them know what you're looking to gain from this. We started out in the same boat: "Well, why would we use you guys versus somebody else?" We had a defined requirement, that we wanted to have centralized event and incident management, and that's exactly what we got. You need to find out if it's going to match all of the various appliances and the OS you have. Is it going to be able to pull in the syslogs? What type of products do you have in your environment? Are you pulling in Cisco devices? Whatever your firewalls are, make sure that they're matching up. I had no doubt in my mind that they were going to match up to everything in our environment, right upfront, as we gave them the list and we did that self-discovery. I think that's part of it was the workbook process. What are your devices? How many are there? What are you using for mail? What are you using for backend storage? What do you have for databases? What are the products on your network? Make sure it matches up. I have no doubt that they'll match up well with everything out there but make sure that whatever is on your network that you want to monitor, that those specific vendors and those devices match what they can track and log events against. Every month, when we do an assessment they ask what more they can do. Until something crops up that leaves us a little bit blind or unsure, I really don't know what they're not giving us at this point. We haven't started looking at any other products to fill any gap. I don't have a laundry list of anything I'm waiting for them to come back with, whether it's a fix or a feature. I'll do a lot of event searches myself, more out of curiosity than anything. I might chase something down if we get a flag or notification and look for what else is taking place around that event, to get a clear picture of why it was flagged. Was this something that we brought into the environment? Were we installing something at the same time that something was flagged? What was going on? So I tend to go into the event searches a lot and the managed devices, looking for non-reportings. Those are probably my two biggest hits. When it went from version 8 to 9, the UI changed up a little bit, so it took a little bit of getting used to. They did provide not only some on-call support to walk through things as I was asking them questions: "Nope, that's here," or, "Give this a try." They also had some pretty easy tutorials to walk through. I've done that a couple of times just to refresh myself as far as where things are. But, like I said, because we tend to lean on them for a lot of the managed side, I don't dig into it as much as I used to when we first got started with it. It's been huge just to have them a phone call away or at arm's length to say, "Can you guys take a look at this, or do this, or verify this for me?" Typically it's just on my desktop at work. If I'm taking a look at the dashboard, I might pull up user devices - what's not reporting in. That's a biggie for us, especially as we roll out new devices and we're getting agents out on those devices. I want to make sure that they're being pulled in correctly and that I'm seeing logs. I may take a look through some of the threats, but again, their support does such a great job of combing through all the threats and kicking out any notifications to me that I don't spend a lot of time in there. In terms of integrating it, we haven't tied EventTracker back into anybody else. At this stage, we're tying everybody into EventTracker. As we start to move into more of the cloud space, there may be some of those cloud-authority services that this may tie into. We haven't gotten to that point yet. The biggest lesson I've learned from using it is that I think we'd take a huge step backward if we ended up losing EventTracker; whether it's EventTracker or a SIEM product of that caliber. We're part of critical infrastructure and the threats against that infrastructure have increased a tremendous amount over the last five to seven years, whether it's on the network side or the OT side. Having the eyes and ears to be able to manage and monitor those types of events against us, in our industry, is massive. Being under a constant threat, like everybody else out there, we want to know what we have, what's in our system; we want to know where the abnormalities are. We want to see the events on a daily basis. You have to track them. You have to be proactive. You have to take some action on those things on a daily basis. Having this in place gives us the ability to see what's going on, on a daily basis, on all of our systems across the enterprise. That's massive to me. I would absolutely rate EventTracker a ten out of ten. I love it.

2019-09-10T09:04:00Z
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Real User

Get the preferred support. This is for the guy who uses and maintains the back-end of the system. Because if you don't have your firewall configurations configured correctly, you will need to have that support. All of our domain controller event logs are consolidated and stored on the server. Right now, we are sitting at 101 domain controllers, which is way too many. However, this was one of the main reasons why we purchased it, and it is performing well. The product version that we are on right now is much faster than the version that we were previously on.

2019-04-02T07:03:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

If it's your first SIEM event-correlation system, be prepared for a long process. That's not just because it's EventTracker. That seems like that's what that process takes. Again, it really depends on what data you want to capture and how much data you want to capture and how you want to review that data. That configuration process can be very time-consuming. We're on EventTracker 8, but we're getting ready to upgrade to the most recent version of nine, but we have not upgraded yet. I don't typically use the dashboard widgets. I have everything configured in daily, weekly, and monthly reports. We have real-time alerts configured as well. So I'm not really utilizing the dashboard widgets. I know it has a lot of features and options but I manage the system from the reports and real-time alerts. In terms of the screens we use to view the solution, we mostly use the Excel reports that are generated daily and weekly. I access them, as well as the real-time alerts, from all devices. You can view them and see the details from any type of device. But I'm looking at the alerts through my email client on whatever device I'm on. We have logs coming from our firewall configured to auto import log data, but we are not manually importing any log data. Currently there are only two users in EventTracker: myself, as the information security officer and another gentleman here at the bank who is the backup information security officer. He functions more as a backup, but he's never had to step into that role and use the system. He received the training, but I handle the whole system. I'm the only one deploying and maintaining the system. We have internal staff resources for internal incident management but we do not use the EventTracker SOC team. We handle the incidents internally, leveraging the reports and alerts. We don't have any plans to increase usage, unless we add one or two offices as we do naturally in our mortgage division. The difficulty with the language barrier at times with their training and technical support staff is a problem. That's why I'd rate it an eight out of ten.

2019-02-24T10:18:00Z
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Top 20Real User

Go through some training to know the ins and outs of the application. It has changed quite a bit in the seven years I've worked with it, and it would be a good idea to do some more training to learn all the new features and to make sure you can utilize all the capabilities. The UI is okay. As I said, we're probably underutilizing the product compared to what we should be using it for. We don't view the information from it on screens. We more go off of the reports that we get daily out of the system. In our company there are only three people using the system. We're all IT managers. We're only monitoring about 30 systems and we don't have plans to increase usage. Total time for deployment and maintenance would be a part-time IT manager, ten hours a year. In terms of internal staff resources for internal incident management, it's the same three IT specialists. I would give the solution an eight out of ten. I'm not giving it a ten because of a lack of understanding of the system and some of the kludginess in the generating of reports.

2019-02-21T08:22:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

The solution has been everything that I've asked for from a service standpoint, software standpoint, and support. I have no complaints. My advice would be to engage them to do the installation. The managed service is great value which saves you a full-time employee on your staff by being able to outsource it to EventTracker to review all the logs and cull through the data to make recommendations and identify threats, then how to remediate them. They provide it to you in your weekly or daily report, depending on how frequently you want to have them do it, which is based on your compliance. If you have compliance requirements for HIPAA, PCI, etc., it is a great benefit to help an organization meet their compliance requirements. We have internal staff resources for internal incident management. We leverage the EventTracker SOC team. When we detected the virus, we kept in contact with the EventTracker SOC team and sent them emails, and they would call me and say that they see it on this server or that desktop, and we'd go and take it off of the network and clean it. Then, we would put it back on and they'd watch to see if they saw any traffic that was not supposed to be coming from that server. For the whole remediation process, they were sort of part of the team. Data is all configured to automatically go in. We deployed their agents, and those agents just send the log data directly to the SIEM. We don't manually upload anything. We did not integrate it with any other solutions.

2019-02-07T12:28:00Z
Learn what your peers think about Netsurion EventTracker. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: April 2020.
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