2020-05-05T10:37:00Z

What advice do you have for others considering Contrast Security Assess?

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If you were talking to someone whose organization is considering Contrast Security Assess, what would you say?

How would you rate it and why? Any other tips or advice?

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77 Answers

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Top 5Real User

Start with a small app team initially, before scheduling a larger rollout. Teams that have been using SAST tools find that using Assess changes how they think about appSec in their development workflow and helps them identify process modifications that maximize the value of the tool. Overall, on a scale from one to ten, I would give this solution a rating of ten. The product is strong and improving, support is responsive and effective, and supported integrations work for many customers.

2021-02-17T23:07:51Z
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Top 5Real User

I would recommend trying and buying it. This solution is something that everyone should try in order to enhance their security. It's a very easy, fast way to improve your code security and health. We do not use the solution’s OSS feature (through which you can look at third-party open-source software libraries) yet. We have not discussed that with our solutions architect, but it's something that we may use in the future when we have more applications onboard. At this point, we have a very specific path in order to raise the volume of those critical apps, then we will proceed to more features. During the renewal, or maybe even earlier than that, we will go with more apps, not just three. One of the key takeaways is that in order to have a secure application, you cannot rely on just the pentest, vulnerability assessments, and the periodicity of the reviews. You need the real-time feedback on that, and Contrast Assess offers that. We were amazed to see how much easier it is to be PCI-compliant once you have the correct solution applied to it. We were humbled to see that we have vulnerabilities which were so easy to fix, but we wouldn't have noticed them if we didn't have this tool in place. It is a great product. I would rate it a nine out of 10.

2020-09-14T06:48:00Z
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Top 5Real User

Make sure you understand your environment before deploying. Try to get an idea of what technologies are in use by applications so you can group them and group the deployment and the implementation. That way you can focus on automating .NET deployments, for example, first, and then move on to Java, etc. The biggest lesson I have learned from using this solution is that there is a tool out there that is really changing the way that we are running security testing. In the security realm we're used to the static and dynamic testing approaches. Contrast Assess, as well as some other tools out there, has this new feature of interactive application security testing that really is the future for developer-driven security, rather than injecting security auditors as bottlenecks into the software development life cycle. I would rate Contrast Security at eight out of 10, and that is because of that the lack of client-side support and the troubles in automating the deployment holistically across an organization.

2020-07-07T11:18:00Z
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Top 10Real User

It depends on the company, but if you want to manage and maintain and onboard, I would recommend having Contrast as part of your toolkit. It is definitely helpful. My advice would be to install it on the environment in which there are more routes exercised, whether it is the testing environment or Dev, to get most out of the tool. In terms of configuration, we have Contrast on one of the applications in our testing environment and we have the other in the Dev environment. To decide on that took us some time because we didn't have access to all the environments of a single application. Findings-wise, Contrast is pretty good. It's up to the app engineer to identify whether a finding is due to the functionality of the application or it really is a finding. Contrast does report some false positives, but there are some useful findings as well from the tool. It cannot give you only true positives, so it's up to humans to make out which ones are true which ones are false. Applications do behave in different ways, and the tool might not understand that. But there are definitely a few findings which have been helpful. It's a good tool. Every other tool also has false positives and it's better than some other tools. We are not actively using the solution's OSS feature, through which you can look at third-party open source software libraries, because we have other tools internally for third-party library scanning. It's been a good journey so far.

2020-07-02T10:06:00Z
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Real User

If you are thinking about Contrast, you should evaluate it for your specific needs. Companies are different. The way they work is different. I know a bunch of companies that still have the Waterfall model. So evaluate and see how it fits in your mode. It's very easy to go and buy a tool, but if it does not fit very well in your processes and in your software development lifecycle, it will be wasted money. My strongest advice is: See how well it fits in your model and in your environment. For example, are developers using more of pre-production? Are they using a Dev sandbox? How is QA working and where do they work? It should work in your process and it should work in your business model. "Change" is the lesson I have taken away by using Contrast. The security world evolves and hackers get smarter, more sophisticated, and more technology-driven. Back in the day when security was very new, people would say a four-letter or six-letter password was more than enough. But now, there is distributed computing, where they can have a bunch of computers trying to compute permutations and combinations of your passwords. As things change, Contrast has adapted well to all the changes. Even five years ago, people would sit in a war room and deploy on weekends. Now, with the DevOps and Dev-SecOps models, Contrast is set up well for all the changes. And Contrast is pretty good in providing solutions. Contrast is not like other, traditional tools where, as you write the code they immediately tell you there is a security issue. But when you have the plugin and something is deployed and somebody is using the application, that's when it's going to tell you there's an issue. I don't think it has an on-desktop tool where, when the developer writes this code, it's going to tell him about an issue at that time, like a Veracode Greenlight. It is more of an IAST. We don't have specific people for maintenance. We have more of a Dev-SecOps model. Our AppSec team has four people, so we distribute the tasks and share it with the developers. We set up a team's integration with them, or a notification with them. That way, as soon as Contrast finds something, they get notified. We try to integrate teams and integrate notifications. Our concern is more about when a vulnerability is found and how long it takes for the developer to fix it. We have worked all that out with Power BI so it actually shows us, when a vulnerability is found, how long it takes to remediate it. It's more like autopilot. It's not like a maintenance type of thing. I would rate Contrast at nine out of 10. I would never give anything a 10, but Contrast is right up there.

2020-06-07T09:09:00Z
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Real User

Make sure that you have a very good change-management strategy in place ahead of time. Also, it's not enough to have the solution itself. It still requires proactive management on behalf of your developers to make sure they understand what the product is offering and that they are using the product in a way that will benefit them.

2020-06-02T08:40:00Z
author avatar
Real User

My advice is: Don't think about it. Do it. The benefits that you'll get from implementing it are enormous, especially for your development teams. They'll be able to look at these vulnerabilities and start remediating them in their environments before even passing them along during the SDLC. In terms of the accuracy of Contrast in identifying vulnerabilities, my assessment is that so far we've had no false positives. However, if you speak to our developers, they will say it does have false positives, but that's not true. Let me give an example. We have several high vulnerabilities that Contrast found. It will say: "Application disable secure flag on cookies." In the lower environments, our Dev and QA environments, we want it that way. We want those cookies to be shared within the development, but we want that flag set on in the higher environment. So developers will say, "Well, that's a false positive." My argument to them is that it's not a false positive. We do want to make sure that those cookies are protected in the higher environment, even if the development team is okay with leaving it open in the lower environments. We need to know that that flag gets set in the higher environment. Therefore, as far as AppSec is concerned, this is not a false positive. We can mark it as not an issue. There's that type of "tennis" between AppSec and the development teams. We are using the OSS feature and looking at those libraries. Our leadership team is planning around the vulnerable libraries that we have on our code base, but rather than fixing these issues individually, application-by-application, they're going to take an enterprise look at it. There's an initiative looking at what Contrast provides versus Black Duck and WhiteHat. They're doing that assessment at an enterprise level. What we're looking for is a tool that alerts us, before we pull it down and bring it in-house, about the status of that library. Contrast is further right than what we're looking for. The leadership wants something farther left to look at these libraries even before the developer downloads it. Right now, Contrast doesn't give us that because it's further right than what the leadership is looking for. We are really building around Contrast. When we bring in new tools, one of the questions we ask is how does it integrate with Contrast. We're looking for tools that complement our use of Contrast. When a new tool is coming in, it goes to our board and they look at how well it integrates with Contrast. We're looking for things that complement our growth with Contrast rather than anything that replaces it. I would rate it at about nine out of 10. If they do come out with a management-level dashboard, that that would be the icing on the cake.

2020-05-05T10:37:00Z
Learn what your peers think about Contrast Security Assess. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: June 2021.
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