2018-07-08T06:36:00Z

What is your primary use case for Ansible?


How do you or your organization use this solution?

Please share with us so that your peers can learn from your experiences.

Thank you!

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1818 Answers

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Top 20Real User

It is used to support WAN network equipment.

2019-03-05T16:24:00Z
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Top 20Real User

The primary use case is for configuration management. We use it for patching and updating. We also use it to send out new configs to all our servers.

2018-12-11T08:31:00Z
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Top 20Real User

Our primary use case is automating security compliance tasks. It has met our expectations. Automating security compliance tasks is what drew us towards the product initially. It definitely checked the boxes for what we needed to be able to implement.

2018-10-21T07:07:00Z
author avatar
Real User

We use it for any sort of automation. We started using Ansible about 18 months back. But then we realized, as we expanded Ansible, that we needed controls around it. We didn't want people just running around crazily running Playbooks. And that's where Tower came in. We bought licenses and it's kind of worked out, though we expect a lot more. I did have a meeting yesterday with the Product Manager for Tower. I did give some suggestions. It's worked out but we've got more expectations, and I hope they work out as well. Some examples of the tasks we've automated include OS patching to begin with - everyone does that. We have been using Ansible and Tower for a lot of data collection, for auditing, collecting data from across different servers: network, OS, Windows, Linux, etc. That's one of our major automations. In addition, AWS and various clouds, if we have to spin something up. We're not using it for compliance yet. I saw a demo about that yesterday and we'll probably explore that.

2018-10-21T07:07:00Z
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Top 20Real User

We use it to manage all configurations and deployments.

2018-10-21T07:07:00Z
author avatar
Real User

Our use case is to stitch together all the units, all the teams writing roles and Playbooks, and provide a central point for execution, and a way of managing what is executing against the infrastructure.

2018-10-21T07:07:00Z
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Real User

So far, the main thing we've been doing with it is using it to automate our monthly patching of servers. Since we have the whole inventory, we can patch this project's servers. We can use the exclude, exclude others, and, in one hour, do a patch that would take people one night to do.

2018-10-21T07:07:00Z
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Real User

Our use case for it is as an automation tool. For the Linux side, we have very few automation tools. We do have Puppet Enterprise as a matter of fact, and we're looking at tools for automating our day-to-day operations, server builds, configuration management, etc. We've got a demo version of Tower. We've been playing with it, using it for patching. One of our first goals is to automate patching.

2018-10-21T07:07:00Z
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Real User

We use it both internally on our managed services offerings, which are new for us, and I've used it for the last two years in my customers' environments to help me with deployments, primarily on the networking side. We also place a big focus on source control and the software development lifecycle.

2018-10-21T07:07:00Z
author avatar
Real User

We just started using Community with Ansible. We are trying to install agents to either a cloud or a local virtual machine. We are still in the starting phase as it has only been implemented for two months.

2018-10-21T07:07:00Z
author avatar
Real User

The primary use case is network automation. I have been trying to use it to roll out new offices and update things, like NTP server changes. I would like to roll NTP server changes out with a couple of clicks instead of having to go and manage several hundred devices. I have been using the product since 2016.

2018-10-21T07:07:00Z
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Top 20Real User

We use it to deploy our infrastructure.

2018-10-21T07:06:00Z
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Real User

You can literally automate everything. Whatever you want to do if you did it with shell scripts, you can do it in Ansible. There is also the ability to use Tower AWX, which allows you to store your variables in a hierarchy. If you're familiar with the Puppet product from more than six years ago, it allowed you to do inheritance on variables. Ansible made sure that they had that in their product. It's also not agent-driven. Therefore, you don't have the added extra bloat to your deployments. Just run your command, then get the code. You can deploy using packages on Ansible or you could deploy binary files by copying over.

2018-10-21T07:06:00Z
author avatar
Real User

Everyone gets super excited about when we show them the automation part of Ansible: * How can you orchestrate things? * How do you operationalize it? * How do you take it to a group of people who don't have the experience writing playbooks themselves nor experience with command line? Tower allows control for more people to use it and have some safety nets behind it.

2018-10-21T07:06:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

We have reached the stage where we really need to automate all our tasks. That is why we are trying to use Ansible Tower. We are trying to help our customers simplify their deployment process for deploying their private clouds, like Red Hat object tags. We start by the deploying the director Undercloud, Overcloud, etc. We are trying to develop automation for White box switches: Integration, deployment, NOS installation, etc.

2018-10-21T07:06:00Z
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Real User

Our group at Oracle has been using the product for at least a year. I have only been using the product for four months.

2018-10-21T07:06:00Z
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Top 20User

We are still implementing it.

2018-10-05T07:47:00Z
author avatar
Consultant

We are using Ansible to automate the infra for various companies in the ASEAN region. The tasks include the creation of virtual machines, provisioning volumes/disks, database installation, user creation, and configuration. The environment includes Linux boxes and Nutanix for software-defined storage.

2018-07-08T06:36:00Z
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