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2019-12-30T06:53:00Z

What advice do you have for others considering Apache Kafka?

10

If you were talking to someone whose organization is considering Apache Kafka, what would you say?

How would you rate it and why? Any other tips or advice?

ITCS user
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1717 Answers

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Top 20Real User

New users should understand the product capabilities. Often, people will start putting their hands in new products without knowing the capabilities and the disadvantages in specific scenarios. In our case for example, We haven't used Kafka for financial transaction processing, for which we still use IBM MQ, but It really depends upon your knowledge and experience with the product. My advice is to understand the product very well, its pros and cons and work from there. Finally I'd rate the solution at a nine out of ten.

2021-08-07T05:24:00Z
author avatar
Top 5LeaderboardReal User

My advice to others wanting to implement this solution is to start with data streaming projects, not simple messaging projects because while it is very good at general-purpose messaging, it is more suited and geared for when you are using it as a streaming solution. I rate Apache Kafka an eight out of ten.

2021-06-26T01:12:49Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

I rate this solution an eight out of 10.

2021-05-12T12:29:06Z
author avatar
Top 5LeaderboardReal User

This is a solution that I may recommend, but its suitability depends on the needs and requirements. I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

2021-02-09T13:56:41Z
author avatar
Top 5LeaderboardReal User

On a scale from one to ten, I would give Apache Kafka a rating of eight.

2020-10-22T16:39:00Z
author avatar
Real User

I think that many people are using Apache Kafka just as a publishing and subscription model, but I feel that Kafka is better than that. Furthermore, Confluent Kafka is even more than that. Confluent Kafka is offering features that are equal to those of a data lake. You can do lots with data, and huge data can be persisted. However, many people are not using that feature. Rather than make use of persistence logic, they are pushing the messages and consuming them. Maybe if people were using it for persistence, they would see the impact or real power of Kafka. I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

2020-09-27T04:09:51Z
author avatar
Top 5LeaderboardReal User

I would recommend trying this solution. Take the time to understand it because it is a different style when it comes to working with data. I would rate this solution a nine out of ten.

2020-08-19T07:57:37Z
author avatar
Top 20Consultant

What happens in our company is a little different. We basically provide services to other companies through Kafka, like our management services. It doesn't necessarily mean we're using the solution ourselves, however, we will be going and deploying Kafka for companies, like a systems integrator. The version of the solution is normally 2.4, however, it depends on the requirements. Our cloud providers are always different due to the fact that the countries that we work with are all different. For example, in the US it could Amazon, Azure, or Google. It varies. I'd advise other organizations considering using the solution to make sure they understand what the use case is. They need to know what their services will be and if they will be directed to Apache Kafka. From a customer perspective, potential companies need to make sure they have an idea of how big it's going to be due to the fact that it's a cluster environment. It needs to be taken care of. Customers will need to know things like what is the message rate is which is coming into Kafka and how they will connect all those different microservices or any services together to Kafka. From an infrastructure perspective, it's more of how big of a cluster a company needs. Who would be the producers to produce it, and who's the consumer who's consuming the data are a few questions that need to be asked. I'd rate the solution eight out of ten.

2020-06-28T08:51:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

Apache Kafka is a good solution with many good features but for large deployments, I would choose IBM MQ over Kafka. I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

2020-04-19T07:40:31Z
author avatar
Real User

My advice would be to go through the documents and understand the topics. Learn what its effects are and take care of partitioning. Based on my experience, I would rate it an eight out of ten. It's quite complicated and the configuration requires a lot of effort. As a developer it is quite hard to go into all these things.

2020-04-05T09:13:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

Although we are deployed on-premises at the moment, we are looking to have a cloud-based deployment in a year or two. This is a solution that I can recommend but it will take a lot of time to develop the adapters. I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

2020-03-30T07:58:09Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

This is currently the product that I am recommending to customers. Some customers want an open-source solution. There are some newer products that are coming on to the market that are even faster than Kafka but this solution is very resilient. In the long run, I think that open-source will dominate the pace. I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

2020-03-30T07:58:07Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

I'd rate the solution eight out of ten. It's good at scaling, and, performance-wise, it's excellent. If they could add upon the UI and allow for easier configuration, I'd rate them higher.

2020-02-03T09:10:16Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

I would rate it a nine out of ten. Not a ten because of the monitoring and admin improvement I'd like for them to make.

2020-01-29T11:22:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

We're using the 2.1.30 version of the solution for our cloud-based clusters. We use the on-premises deployment model. Most customers use the on-premise solution for cloud-based clusters. Kafka is a very good solution for log management. If you need anything done related to log management, Kafka can do it. Kafka can also store the data in the brokers. This prevents data loss as well as the duplication of data. It's quite comprehensive. I'd rate the solution seven out of ten. If the solution could provide a user interface I'd rate it higher. This is important for managing Kafka's clusters on the administration side. It would also be helpful if two to three files could be minimized to one configuration file.

2020-01-19T06:38:00Z
author avatar
Top 20Real User

In this type of solution, you need to be able to accept a high volume of messages, but not lose any, and not have any duplicates. Because we are unable to control the queue in Kafka, I cannot say that this works 100%. The suitability of this solution depends on the use cases. There are two or three things that we are worried about, and we will be very careful in choosing solutions. In cases where the messages are well organized, or there is no worry that there will be duplicate or dropped messages, then I recommend using Kafka. Also, I recommend this solution for those looking to get involved with open-source applications. Other than the problems with having no control over the queue, Apache Kafka is wonderful. I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

2020-01-12T07:22:00Z
author avatar
Real User

I would definitely recommend Kafka. In our current position, we use it to move a lot of data and I think it's definitely working well. I would definitely recommend it. I would rate it an eight out of ten.

2019-12-30T06:53:00Z
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