PostgreSQL OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

PostgreSQL is the #3 ranked solution in our list of top Open Source Databases. It is most often compared to Firebird SQL: PostgreSQL vs Firebird SQL

What is PostgreSQL?

PostgreSQL is a powerful and fully-featured database management system with which business owners can create object relational tables. It is an open source project that can be acquired for free and heavily focuses on elements such as extensibility and strict standard compliance. PostgreSQL is a flexible server system that can manage large workloads that are being contributed and accessed from a wide range of locations such as in a network, as well as small-scale projects like a single machine or user.

Some technical details of interest about PostgreSQL include:

  • Its MVCC (Multi-inversion concurrency control) allows fluid changes to be made to the system without cumbersome roadblocks, while maintaining the optimal level of ACID.
  • Replication, built-in binary replication is available from the 9.0 version and later.
  • It offers a wide range of indexing capabilities, including B-tree and hash indexes, as well as GIN and GiST (generalized inverted indexes and generalized search trees).
  • It uses procedural languages that make it easier for developers to expand the database.
PostgreSQL Buyer's Guide

Download the PostgreSQL Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: August 2021

PostgreSQL Customers

Hundreds of companies have used PostgreSQL, including the University of Alabama, Birmingham, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, Champion Products, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization, the U.S. Agency for Disease Control and Prevention, and IMDB.com.

Pricing Advice

What users are saying about PostgreSQL pricing:
  • "It is also open-source so it is free."
  • "PostgreSQL is open-source, so if capable admins are available then the setup cost can be $0."
  • "It is open source. There is no licensing."
  • "PostgreSQL is a free and open-source database."

Filter Reviews

Filter by:
Filter Reviews
Industry
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Company Size
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Job Level
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Rating
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Considered
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Order by:
Loading...
  • Date
  • Highest Rating
  • Lowest Rating
  • Review Length
Search:
Showingreviews based on the current filters. Reset all filters
Jason Tumusiime
Software Developer at a healthcare company with 1-10 employees
Real User
Top 20
Can be clustered which allows for fault tolerance

What is our primary use case?

Currently, I'm doing a lot of source applications with Ruby on Rails, React, and mobile applications. PostgreSQL is my preferred database over MySQL. It's open-source and licenses are free, so it is excellent. The SQL queries are almost the same as MySQL.

Pros and Cons

  • "Clustering will be the number 1 feature. It is also open-source so it is free. It can also be clustered, to allow fault tolerance."
  • "It could be improved by using parallelization. You want basically, distributed computing."

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to use PostgreSQL instead of MySQL because of licensing issues. Another reason is that Oracle may remove MySQL soon or add substantial costs to using it It may even turn into something like MariaDB, and then you would need to know if MariaDB and MySQL work the same? PostgreSQL really works well. There are a lot of other databases around right now, but PostgreSQL is the most popular. It is not like a hammer and a nail situation whereby it is the only thing you have to use. If you need a relational database management system, go for PostgreSQL instead of MariaDB or MySQL, then…
PG
Subdirector - Digital Products and Services at a media company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
A stable solution with an easy setup for media management

What is our primary use case?

We use the solution for media purposes. We manage the sites of one of the largest sports business papers and multiple TV channels. So, we develop the websites.

Pros and Cons

  • "The solution provides complete support in terms of the SQL dialect and behaves nicely when it comes to transactions."
  • "A better graphic user-interface would be nice to see."

What other advice do I have?

We deploy the solution both on-premises and on AWS. I had my doubts about the functionality before joining this company, as it seemed very complex. It turns out that the solution is actually very simple to set up and we have it working all the time without any problems. It survives the network partitions, so we like this very much. My advice is that a person just try it and use it. For me, it beats out JSON and is superior to MongoDB. It works in a completely different way. But, overall, I would rather use PostgreSQL when it comes to starting and manipulating JSON and it boasts superior…
Learn what your peers think about PostgreSQL. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: August 2021.
534,226 professionals have used our research since 2012.
Kaan Çelik
Data Analytics and Business Intelligence Manager at a computer software company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 5
Easy to use, flexible and stable

What is our primary use case?

The database is used for our customers' products. We also offer some products on our POC system, and our customer's POC systems post some data stored on PostgreSQL on the cloud. Our company's data doesn't store at PostgreSQL. We still have our system MS SQL and Oracle.

Pros and Cons

  • "The product is quite flexible."
  • "The pricing could be better."

What other advice do I have?

We're just customers and end-users. We generally use the last version, as we try to ensure all of our programs are the latest technology. Therefore, we generally use cloud platforms like Amazon or Microsoft, which is Azure. Whichever version is on the cloud, we generally use that version. That said, some of it is on the cloud and some of it is on-premise. In Turkey, we have some legal requirements that require some data to be stored in our country. We have to store it locally. Therefore, we can't use the cloud completely. I'd recommend the solution to other organizations. I would rate the…
Faustine Chisasa
Engineering Supervisor- Corporate Data Solutions and Services at TZ Telecoms. Corporation
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Easy to manage, good integration, improves performance, and saves on storage space

What is our primary use case?

I use PostgreSQL on-premises to store monitoring data collected by the Zabbix Server. I wanted a database engine that could handle an ingress of a thousand real-time values per second, delete old items without affecting performance, and handle hundreds of user requests at all times. The solution had to support high compression and time series data while maintaining data integrity and performance. I wanted the database engine to be easy to tune, secure, and set up. PostgreSQL has regular updates and plenty of official and community resources.

Pros and Cons

  • "We managed to reduce the storage space needed to 10% of the original size, without affecting data integrity, and we significantly improved the performance."
  • "PostgreSQL uses high memory compared to its counterparts when a highly demanding load is involved, especially one that makes many concurrent connections to the database."

What other advice do I have?

For anybody who is considering this solution, my advice is that it is better to do enough research on the specific database engine requirements. I highly recommend PostgreSQL with TimescaleDB extension for time-series data.
MS
Head of Technical Support at a real estate/law firm with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Free to use, stable, and quick to set up

What is our primary use case?

We use it for processing files mostly. It integrates basically with the SQL Server. On the server-side it uses the SQL Server, then from the files that are generated from SQL Server we do have an application running using Microsoft, and we attach it to a Postgres server. We do is for the backups there from time to time.

Pros and Cons

  • "The product is very similar to the SQL Server."
  • "I'm not really able to customize it."

What other advice do I have?

The last one that we used is version 11 or something like that. I'm not sure if that's the latest version or not. Postgres is similar to Linux. It's designed for people who would know what they want, who would have to set up what they need, and they would use it, and they know that it's straightforward, so that other people cannot just go in and mess with it. I'd rate the product as a nine out of ten. I'd recommend the solution to other users.
NK
Senior IT Manager at a pharma/biotech company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Scales well and offers a quick and easy setup

What is our primary use case?

Typically, our team runs the database and then the applications, on Postgres. However, I'm not part of the development process.

Pros and Cons

  • "The initial setup is quick and easy."
  • "It would be great if the solution offered even more integration capabilities."

What other advice do I have?

We are simply a customer and end-user. We don't have a business relationship with PostgreSQL. The solution is deployed both on the cloud and on-premises. We use more than one deployment model. I can't recall the exact version number we are using, however, it's my understanding that it is not necessarily the latest version. I'd recommend this product to other organizations. It's worked well for us so far. In general, I would rate the solution at an eight out of ten.
SP
IT Systems Administrator at a transportation company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 20
Comprehensive, integrates well, and does what it is supposed to do

What is our primary use case?

We use it as a backend for some vendor-supplied tools and products. We also do a certain amount of software development, and we use it as the database platform behind our own software. We have a number of deployments, and the version number very much depends on the vendor software requirements. We have on-premises and cloud deployments.

Pros and Cons

  • "It is a pretty comprehensive database system. Its performance is good, and it does what it is supposed to do. It also integrates very well."
  • "There are some products out there that have a slightly different method of implementation for the SQL language. Some of those are slightly better in some areas, and PostgreSQL is slightly better in some areas. I would probably like to match all of those products together. It is just down to the functionality. For example, Oracle has a number of options within SQL that are outside of what you would class as the SQL standard. PostgreSQL misses some of those, but PostgreSQL does other things that are better than what Oracle does. I would like to merge those two products so that there is a certain amount of functionality in a single product."

What other advice do I have?

It is a very good RDBMS, and I'm quite happy with it. It does what it says, and it does it fairly well. I've seen some bits that are stronger in other products and some bits that are weaker in other products. My recommendation would depend on the requirements and the use cases. I would rate PostgreSQL a nine out of 10. It does its job adequately, and I am quite happy with what it does at the moment. You wouldn't hear a 10 from me for any database vendor at the moment.
KA
Chief technical officer at a healthcare company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 20
You can provide a multi-component with the database at the same service with the same performance and scalability

What is our primary use case?

The database for the accounting systems is our primary use case for this solution. Business software is 80% of my use case in the accounting software. It's a good tool for planning. I work with financial data and the data mining aspect is very important, as I need to access the data easily. The data is the most important thing. Sometimes the software developers forget this part because they just want to save the data on the database, but they don't know how to manipulate the data. The performance of the solution is dependant on how easily and quickly you can obtain access to the data.

Pros and Cons

  • "With the database, you can provide a multi-component at the same service with the same performance, scalability, or all those things."
  • "The database and applications can become very slow."

What other advice do I have?

If you want one tenant, you can use MySQL. If you want a multi-tenant, I think Postgres is better. SQL on PostgreSQL is linked to Oracle. Oracle and Postgres is the same thing, the same language. You will not have a big change for the software developers to migrate from Oracle to Postgres. I would rate PostgreSQL 8 out of 10.
See 16 more PostgreSQL Reviews
Product Categories
Open Source Databases
Buyer's Guide
Download our free PostgreSQL Report and get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions.