Tidal Automation Overview

Tidal Automation is the #4 ranked solution in our list of top Workload Automation tools. It is most often compared to Control-M: Tidal Automation vs Control-M

What is Tidal Automation?

Tidal Software is a leading provider of enterprise workload automation solutions that orchestrate the execution of complex workflows across systems, applications and IT environments. With a comprehensive portfolio of products and services, Tidal optimizes mission-critical business processes, increases IT cost efficiencies and satisfies legal and regulatory compliance requirements. Hundreds of customers around the world count on Tidal for modernizing their workload automation and driving their digital transformation. Tidal Software is headquartered in Chicago with offices in Houston, London, Minsk, Belarus and Chennai, India. For more information, visit tidalsoftware.com.

Tidal Automation is also known as Tidal Workload Automation, Cisco Workload Automation, Tidal Enterprise Scheduler.

Tidal Automation Buyer's Guide

Download the Tidal Automation Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: February 2021

Tidal Automation Customers


Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Tidal Automation pricing:
  • "...it is a pretty affordable scheduler tool that lets us do a lot. You get a lot of bang for the buck... The licensing model is hugely flexible."
  • "Our yearly licensing costs are between $10,000 to $20,000. They have always been reasonable with us. I like that non-production licensing is about half the cost of production licensing. Licensing is by adapter typically. We have had scenarios where we have had to take an adapter from one environment to another, and they've allowed us to do that. They have made it a very reasonable process. There's definitely a feeling that they will work with you."
  • "The licensing model is very flexible and very transparent... It's flexible for budgeting. I know what I need and I have licenses to cover those needs. If a project comes along that needs a new type of license or an added license, that would just be added to the project."
  • "The new prices that we've received seem reasonable and comparable to the marketplace."
  • "Our annual maintenance cost is competitive for what we have and what they do."
  • "There are project, system, and server costs. Some of the things that they are doing is introducing new products. They are introducing what they call their Repository, which is a way for you to move a job. That doesn't cost anything to us, because it is reusing a tool called Transporter. The repository is the successor to Transporter, so we already own it and are sort of grandfathered in. But that new product requires a server and database, so now we have to go out and get a server and database. So, there is a cost there."

Tidal Automation Reviews

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Reviewer957656
Tidal Administrator at a retailer with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Feb 18, 2020
Gives us the ability to see everything across our scheduling universe, without having to access multiple systems

What is our primary use case?

We're running jobs on a global scale. Being a global company, we're running scheduled jobs and ad hoc jobs across different regions. Jobs cover backend processing, financials, and the like. We're running on an SAP ERP system and we're also running Informatica for data warehouse. We're running BusinessObjects web reports as well as a lot of straight Windows and Unix command-line things. We run FTP processing, PGP encryption processing, and data services jobs. We're running about seven or eight of the different adapter types that Tidal has available. We have it on-prem. Both our test and… more »

Pros and Cons

  • "The feature that I find to be valuable, as I'm working with other folks, is the ability to cross-schedule across platforms, and the flexibility that comes with that."
  • "From a management standpoint, when using the solution for cross-platform, cross-application workloads, I've never had a problem with the application. It's very interactive, especially with the different security levels that they offer."
  • "For the most part, the drill-down and the logging are really good. But if we take an Informatica job, for example: We have the ability, and the operators have the ability, to actually drill down and see, at a session level, where the failure is. There is, unfortunately, no way to extract that into an actual output email or failure email. It's not that that information is not available, but extracting it into an email would be a nice-to-have."

What other advice do I have?

As with any product you're looking at, first of all, don't get pigeonholed into it. Don't have a laser-focus on an individual product. But with Tidal, especially now that they're rebuilding the customer base, reach out and work with their salespeople, and network with current users. One thing I found, especially being on some of the network boards — they used to have a Yahoo Group for Tidal — people aren't afraid to say, "Hey, this works great and this doesn't." I'll be the first to tell you what works great and what still needs some work. And now that Tidal has put its own forum together, the…
EmmetWagle
Sr System Engineer at a financial services firm with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Feb 5, 2020
Alerts when things are falling behind schedule, or something unexpectedly fails, enable us to jump in and address an issue

What is our primary use case?

We use it to manage our batch processing. For us, it came in as a replacement for a lot of different systems running crontab. In our case it's primarily for Unix/Linux systems that don't have their own mechanism for kicking off all these batch processes. It's the coordinator of all of our background processes and batch jobs that are running overnight and during the day. We use it to kick off custom Unix/Linux scripts that will launch our application processes. It's almost entirely Windows and Linux shell scripts that it's kicking off.

Pros and Cons

  • "The first, big thing that we got out of using Tidal Workload Automation was having a centralized view of the status of all of our batch processes across all these systems... We can look into the schedule at any given time and see if things are running on track or if they are falling behind. We can also see if something failed."
  • "Their software installation and update process could use some improvements. I'm pretty sure they're working on that, but that's definitely an area where it could be streamlined a lot. There's still a lot of manual work that you have to do with the schedule when you deploy masters or do the agents."

What other advice do I have?

The big thing I would say to someone who is deploying this new, aside from having a naming standard and the structure, would be to get their security groups right, up-front. That is a pretty big one. Set your owners and who your users are going to be. Think about how you are going to structure it from a user point of view. We have two core systems here. One is for our loan origination system and the other is for allocating leads and directing leads, and they both rely on Tidal heavily. If the scheduler were to shut down for some reason and we couldn't run it, it would have a huge impact on our…
Learn what your peers think about Tidal Automation. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: February 2021.
464,655 professionals have used our research since 2012.
LeeAnn McLennan
Application Engineer at Columbia Sportswear
Real User
Top 20
Feb 16, 2020
Scheduling across multiple applications gives a holistic view

What is our primary use case?

We use Tidal to run jobs across multiple application platforms, such as SAP, ECC, PDN, and Informatica, as well as jobs that run in Azure cloud. We also use it for several warehouse management jobs with OS/400 and AS/400 connectors. We have a lot of different types of connectors, then we are bringing all these jobs into Tidal so we can set up dependencies between jobs that run, e.g., an SAP job and a OS400 job may be dependent on each other in some way, allowing a cross-platform job flow. We are currently on the most recent version.

Pros and Cons

  • "Thinking of all the people involved in checking jobs on a daily basis, manually running jobs or auditing them through standalone tools, and trying to connect them. We have saved hundreds of hours weekly, which is substantial."
  • "I'm still hoping with Explorer to be able to see end-to-end job streams. That's not really something that's easy to see today in the web client. However, I haven't worked with Explorer yet. One of the things that we have found frustrating is not being able to see an end-to-end job stream across multiple applications within Tidal. We use jobs for that right now, but I have high hopes that we'll be able to see that in Explorer."

What other advice do I have?

Depending on how you will roll it out, engage people who will be managing the jobs earlier in process so they are aware and can help plan how Tidal is used across the environment. That is something that I wish the people who had rolled it out had done. I don't know if that was even a consideration back then. There were definitely things that I would love to change about how we do our scheduling which are just so baked in at this point that it would be such a large change. Also, make sure that you engage and use Tidal's resources. They have some great resources and know what they are doing…
JonFredrickson
JDE Manager at Oshkosh
Real User
Top 20
Jul 7, 2020
We know when we schedule a job it will submit and we'll be notified of any errors, enabling us to be proactive, not reactive

What is our primary use case?

We have a product called J.D. Edwards which is our ERP system. Our biggest use case for Tidal is to automate jobs that we submit through J.D. Edwards. Our second use case would be automating maintenance — stopping services, deleting logs — your "keeping the lights on" type of stuff. And our third use case is using it for any automation tasks that we come across. Tidal is our product of choice at the moment. If we're going to automate something, we're going to use Tidal to automate it. We integrate Tidal with Linux, Windows, iSeries, SQL Server, and Oracle, in addition to J.D. Edwards.

Pros and Cons

  • "The solution also enables admins and users to see the information relevant to them. They're able to actually run jobs that they weren't necessarily able to run before. They can see the output and they can be notified when there are issues and resolve those issues before they cause more issues."
  • "One thing I would like to see is better training on both how to set up and support the product as well as on how to make use of the product, especially regarding the scripting that is available."

What other advice do I have?

Don't feel ashamed that you'll wonder why you waited so long. I've used so many other products, gotten them up and running, but I don't know of any other product that works as easily as Tidal does for scheduling jobs for J.D. Edwards. I'm sure there are other people who use Tidal for other stuff, but J.D. Edwards is what I mostly know. I think it's the only scheduler you should use if you run J.D. Edwards. The biggest lesson I've learned using Tidal is don’t wait so long. It took me five years to convince my boss that he should let me buy Tidal. He even brought in another product, and I sat…
JasonJavitz
Tidal Administrator at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
Jan 16, 2020
Robust calendaring enables us to set up very specific job run-times to even account for holidays

Pros and Cons

  • "For us, the calendaring system is very robust. Some of the teams have very specific requests for when they need jobs to run. That's been really valuable, because a lot of times, when people run scripts, if they run on a holiday, they're going to fail... A couple of times a month it probably saves us work and the necessity of logging in from home and checking to make sure everything's okay."
  • "Especially in the newer versions of Tidal, the segmentation of user permissions enables us to give people operator permissions for their jobs, to rerun jobs, but view-only for other groups' jobs. We're able to keep people from hurting themselves or other groups accidentally. The permissioning is really good."
  • "I don't know if Tidal wants to get into the business of monitoring long-running jobs, but that could be a feature for the future: a job launching and monitoring tool. Using Tidal for monitoring doesn't seem like a good fit, but if they could offer something that did that as an add-on or include it, it might be helpful."

What other advice do I have?

Because our environment is older, it's a little tough to integrate some of the newer features that they're offering. That's because of the way we had to configure our environment for older versions that didn't have these newer features. In terms of how you delegate permissions, how you set up calendars, who you give permissions to, my advice would be to figure out how the permissioning structure works before you set up your environment, and stick with a standard. A lot of the time, we're having to go backwards to make things standardized. If we started over right now, I know how I would set up…
reviewer1275663
Team Lead at a manufacturing company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Feb 4, 2020
An essential tool for us to manage and run SAP jobs

What is our primary use case?

We use it primarily to run SAP jobs. While there is other minor stuff it runs in, 98 percent is SAP. We have a number of different types of SAP systems. There are different teams who are responsible for configuring, managing, and setting up jobs. They are the ones who define the jobs and schedule them. There is an administrative team who is responsible for maintaining the system landscape and providing training for Tidal. They also provide standards, guidance, guidelines, and jobs. We use the solution for cross-platform, cross-application workloads within SAP. Therefore, within SAP, we might… more »

Pros and Cons

  • "We wouldn't be able to do many of the complex scheduling that we do today without it. For us, it is a mission-critical app. Because if it doesn't work or has a problem, then SAP doesn't function. It is that critical. So, it's an essential tool for us to manage and run SAP jobs."
  • "One of the weaknesses of the product is, when something happens, it's difficult to find out the root cause. There are a lot of logs you can take a look at in Tidal. Sometimes, they are useful, but other times, they're not. That is mostly relegated to the administrative team. Users for the most part don't see that and don't know anything about that. They just know they have a problem, then it's up to the administrative team to see what happened and figure out the problem."

What other advice do I have?

We originally liked the product for the user interface, because of it was easy to use and the features, such as calendaring, dependencies, etc. I don't think the solution is difficult to implement and learn. Though, it depends. It certainly has some very advanced features which require more than cursory knowledge of other products. It takes time for that, and there is always a learning curve for whatever product you do. In general, it is a fairly easy product to install and use, if you are flexible as far as how you want to deploy it. It's very straightforward to understand and install, but…
AndrewGriffin
Lead Control Analyst at Central States Funds
Real User
Feb 11, 2020
Enables us to verify and to send out notices that a given step has started or finished

What is our primary use case?

We use Tidal extensively to run our health and welfare claims processing throughout the day. That's the reason we got Tidal back in 2011. We receive 15,000 to 20,000 claims a day and we use Tidal to process the whole thing, all the way through to creating checks at the end of the day. Since 2011, we've expanded it to other applications and other processes: mostly reports, and files that come in electronically from other companies that feed other applications. And in a roundabout way, what we use Tidal for is to execute the applications to load whatever needs to be done on those applications… more »

Pros and Cons

  • "One of the most useful features is being able to set up a schedule and create dependencies. The calendar can kick off processes at certain times, based on dependencies that you specify, like time, or whether another process has finished. Dependencies are the most useful thing."
  • "We've had some quirky stuff happen on an occasional basis where a job does not take off. For example, a job we expected to be finished by 3:00 a.m. is sitting there and not executing when we come in in the morning. We have to go all the way back to the dependencies and then we can see that one of the dependencies has become unscheduled, for some reason. No changes were made to the schedule but this prerequisite job has, all of a sudden, become unscheduled. I have brought this up with Tidal's support but they have never had an answer for it."

What other advice do I have?

The biggest advice I can give is to test Tidal first. Run the whole schedule, whatever you're putting in. Run everything you can and test Tidal before you bring it over to production. The trickiest thing to do is to change a schedule during the day. Once you associate a job with the calendar, and then somebody comes by and says, "Hey, I want to put these six steps in, and we need to run that today," if you try to change that schedule during the day, you don't realize that, because you put it on the calendar, it's on a schedule. You could be making changes and kicking off things inadvertently…
reviewer1283868
Production Control Analyst at a healthcare company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Feb 13, 2020
Enables me to construct groupings with dependencies that automatically allow jobs to run in the proper sequence

What is our primary use case?

I have three installs of Tidal: production, qual and dev. I have a portfolio of 12,000 unique job definitions in production, 13,500 definitions in qual, and about 8,000 in dev. The Tidal adapters I use are for Windows and Linux agents, as well as Informatica, Cognos, and mSQL.

Pros and Cons

  • "We had a number of different schedulers in this organization and we've been porting everything that was running out of these other, unrelated schedulers into this scheduler. That has afforded us the ability to set up direct dependencies between processes that couldn't talk to one another before. Over the 15 years, we've definitely gained a lot from that. What had been manual controls have become automated controls..."
  • "From an administrative point of view, I wouldn't give really high marks to the solution. I actually entertained getting the JAWS application at one point. One of the shortcomings with the scheduler is the reporting capabilities. At least at the time, JAWS was the best that they had for a third-party integration. I think they've got things in the pipeline to help alleviate that gap."

What other advice do I have?

One piece of advice I would have is that if you get into a product, try to keep it upgraded. It's to your benefit, support-wise to be, maybe not on the cutting or the bleeding edge, but close to the current version. That's been a pain point for Tidal, to try and get their clients up to speed. Stay on the latest version because of the functionality. It's not only relevant to just this tool, but to many IT tools. It's just like the next generation of laptops that are coming out; they're coming out more quickly. The same thing is happening with the functionality that is being added to all of…
See 7 more Tidal Automation Reviews