CA Service Virtualization Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
 (53)
Anonymous avatar x80
Real User
Sr Development Manager at a comms service provider with 1,001-5,000 employees

What is most valuable?

For CA Service Virtualization, it’s the ability to quickly prototype something. My guys really like the ability where they can do the recording session. It's a way for them to initialize for existing services where they need to get it up and... more»

How has it helped my organization?

When I originally bought Service Virtualization there were several things that we leveraged it for. One of them was that we had a merger acquisition, and we needed to interface the two systems together. So we needed to be able to share all... more»

What needs improvement?

There were things early where we couldn’t do a few things in Service Virtualization that have since been updated. The concern I have right now with Release Automation is the concept of what we call immutable objects, so I build it once in... more»
Anonymous avatar x80
Real User
Senior IT Manager - Service Virtualisation at a financial services firm with 1,001-5,000 employees

What is most valuable?

It is introducing a lot more flexibility for us. It reduces time scales, getting time to market. It also helps us cross-skill some of the people, and start to really bring that DevOps mentality into the bank. I suppose in our payments estate... more»

How has it helped my organization?

It's time to market of course, and also the total cost of ownership. We don't have to build big end-to-end environments anymore. Previously, any major project would come along and say, "I need to build more kit," and you just keep filling... more»

What needs improvement?

I think the ones we've wanted have come through, actually. Because ours was such an old version, and we said at the time, "We'd like to see x, y, and zed". They're already in 9, and what I've seen of version 10, it's even more closely bundled... more»
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C697eb3a 1b19 4dd7 aec0 671c70435ccb avatar?1455192047
Real User
Director of Quality Engineering at a financial services firm with 501-1,000 employees

What is most valuable?

Service Virtualization allows you to function in an isolated manner. It allows you to not be so dependent on systems that, in traditional testing, causes you delays, causes impacts to your overall time testing schedule, and just creates an... more»

How has it helped my organization?

The biggest thing, the huge time to market gain. The other thing is just financial efficiency. We're seeing huge financial gains in terms of using the tools. One of the biggest things that I like about the CA products is they do what they say... more»

What needs improvement?

I think some of the monitoring capabilities could be enhanced. Those aren't necessarily major gaps for us, but I think that would be good. Just some of the real time monitoring and reporting capabilities. Some of the solutions that we've had... more»
5e6fbf68 1b56 491a 99d5 9908f0a69309 avatar
Real User
Test Automation Architect at American family insurance

What is most valuable?

A while ago, we were looking for a tool to do testing across the web services. During that time, we were doing some PoCs on SoapUI. We did a PoC with Lisa. The company name was ITKO. After going through several PoC sessions, we figured out... more»

How has it helped my organization?

We use it as a kind of defect-finding tool when it comes to regression testing and automation testing. You can’t use the tests against pages that have JavaScript calls being made from them. So CA wrote a Chrome plug-in for us, which, once... more»

What needs improvement?

At the point of next release, we would really like to see the issues being resolved which we are facing right now with dynamic applications. Now, most of the applications in the market, in the industry, and most of the companies are rolling... more»
4ade7d7c a5da 4021 8743 5537b168e914 avatar
Consultant
Consultant at a aerospace/defense firm with 1,001-5,000 employees

What is most valuable?

Using the agile method, each iteration is scheduled to last 1-2 weeks and development would take up most of that. The testers didn't have enough time to properly test the application. With Service Virtualization, we virtualized the services... more»

How has it helped my organization?

We not only use Service Virtualization for web services, we also use it to virtualize services that we used to pay for. It can be used in the enterprise bus to integrate external applications. In the QA domain, you need to pay a lot to use... more»

What needs improvement?

We still have mainframe systems and while CA provides instructions on how to integrate Linux-based applications, they don’t provide integration steps for mainframe. We would like to see improvements in mobile integration. Integration is... more»
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User Assessments By Topic About CA Service Virtualization

For CA Service Virtualization, it’s the ability to quickly prototype something. My guys really like the ability where they can do the recording session. It's a way for them to initialize for existing services where they need to get it up and running. The ability to have a listener and capture sample packets was a key thing that they really liked. It really helped us jump-start something. We could do something within an hour to have it up and initially runnin Also, the ability to have the different back end connectivities, whether it's an Excel spreadsheet, or more complex things where we’re now linking the data sets and responses back together. Those have been a couple of the key areas for us and have been very beneficial. It’s also certainly a lot better than just doing stub code, because now I have templates that I can more readily reuse. That's better than just somebody who’s kind of building up the Java code to build stubs. We keep running into situations where people will start building stubs and things like that, and we'll come back and show them the benefits of this solution. Once they start to see it in use, then they start to say “oh, okay, this is a lot better on that side.” From a CA Release Automation perspective, it’s certainly the idea of being able to do the automated deployment. The challenges are that we started off down this path a few years ago, we purchases some licenses and have not taken full advantage of them to this point. We've had an ongoing challenge within our environment that stood up quickly. Now we're getting a little bit more focused about this. I'm already doing some work on it and we’ll be doing more over the next few weeks. We’ll be looking at the Release Automation tools for coming up with the best processes for us to be able to have a repeatable process that quickly can deploy code without having to do a lot of manual steps. We want a good and clean workflow. I think one of the things that we did appreciate was that changes were coming in to the product at a good cadence. We needed to support WebLogic, which was a big one for us at the time. Those things did come in, and we didn't have to wait a huge amount of time. I always felt like the product has been getting good updates to support us as we were doing some of those activities. One of the things that we know and we're trying to work through is looking at when I go to set an environment up, maybe I don't quite have that new service yet, but I have other applications, my UI application, or whateveris ready to go, but I have this other middleware call that needs to be available. The idea that I can spin up or point myself to a virtualized service without one piece of it, but still use the rest of the end to end system, that's kind of one of those things that we would envision. I'm doing a deployment of an environment / application, it's being configured, and then if I need to I'm going to use virtualized services for some or all. What we've been working on is how we can do a lot of that shift to the left by using service virtualization, so when we deploy we can at least get the development teams testers up and running on the application. Then we just have them virtualized on the back end. That might be how we would be setting up and configuring ourselves. It's definitely in that situation where you don't have a true end to end environment, but still need to be up and testing. That's where Service Virtualization would couple with the deployment in my book. CA Test Data Manager is where there's one kind of end to end system and there has to be a system of data. A lot of times these call systems are hitting, and so having that model so that we can get it into the data, so when we deploy the software, you're going to bring this up. It may be our building data, which is an interesting challenge for us because it's a third party product, though they work very closely and have people on site with us. Other systems that might need to have a configuration- there's all the types of users that are allowed into the system, or other types of price catalog information, whatever we want to model, that's where TDM is in your standing open environment, that's where you need to have something in place. For some of our systems where we have to have data in it and available to product catalogs or something like that, then the TDM data can be very beneficial, and we can swap the data around, so we might be trying a new product catalog that's coming out, or new few features that are going to be offered, whereas we can also then go back to a production-like configuration as well.
When I originally bought Service Virtualization there were several things that we leveraged it for. One of them was that we had a merger acquisition, and we needed to interface the two systems together. So we needed to be able to share all the account information and those types of activities that were happening. There was going to be a set of middleware services that were going to be built on our end to allow the other system to communicate. Before that was ready, they wanted to start testing. We could use Service Virtualization in that case to let them start working with it before those middleware services were built. That was really beneficial. That's actually how I brought the product in in the first place. The next thing that we really used it for was training. In the past, we tried to have training environments that were done different ways. They actually tried to have one application where they had two people dedicated to just trying to keep a full end to end environment up and functioning. They were never really able to do that. It kind of went by the wayside. It was expensive, and they just couldn't keep it in sync, and it was breaking. You've got enough different systems going that they couldn't fix all the issues. You had to go to either the development teams or somebody to help you out with how to figure out where the problem was. That wasn't real tenable. Another way people have been trying to do it was they would build a simulator. One of them was a Flash-type simulator that tried to do it, but of course that would get out of date, and then they'd have to go back and spend a lot of money that way to try to update it. What we did is we built the services we needed to allow the applications to work in a training scenario so people could run those training scenarios when new sales people were coming in. They could run them with our call center folks and they have an opportunity to start working with the app ahead of time and not have to work with real data, per se. We've had a situation where folks forgot to scrub the phone numbers. They took them straight from production, so a little bit to the TDM type of situation, and what happened was I got an e-mail shortly after we released one of our products, it had come all the way down from the CEO, people were trying to figure out what happened - a lady had called and said her daughter had had her phone number changed three times in the course of one week. It turned out that people were actually using the real live system instead of the training environment, but they were reading the training documentation, ‘do this, put this phone number in.’ Those phone numbers were real phone numbers in this case, and we would treat it as one, or we'll call it real account numbers. People were changing those account numbers on the customer, and that wasn't so good. We quickly went to scrubbed account numbers, but that was one of those things, just one of those side effects where a TDM type of solution can become very important and helpful to make sure that you're running it through that kind of scrubbing process. Those are a couple things, the training, the helping to get things going, and then the shift to the left. That's been a real benefit for us. We can get more testing in sooner and we actually had one project where I pushed us to use it because we couldn't get a stable environment, so I said let's virtualize those services. In doing that, we actually were able to allow the teams to do all their testing. By the time it got to our QA testing, I believe they found only one defect in the application on that. The later in the cycle that you find defects, the more expensive it is, so finding those things upfront and doing it even without an environment that had full end to end capability, which was kind of always my point, was you may find some integration issues, but you can get so much of the functionality tested of an application with Service Virtualization if you've done a decent job versus just having to wait to get a full environment, especially when you don't have stable environments. For Release Automation, obviously what we wanted is things that are repeatable so that we can do things faster, and it doesn't require the manual configuration because when you start to drive for faster cadence, you just have to rely on more and more automation. It has to be a known process, you implement it, and if you fix it once, it fixes it for all of your deployments. The other important thing here is that you must make sure that whatever processes you settle on, you're going to do it. Whether you're doing it in your Dev environment, your QA, your staging or your production, you want the same process everywhere so that if you find the problem, you can fix it once, and that fixes it for everybody. You’re always running a prod type environment as well, which just ensures much more when you get there. A lot of companies including ourselves have been in a situation where what we do in production is distinctly different from any of the other environments, and that leads to a lot of extra resources being dedicated just to managing the production environments. Release Automation allows us to implement processes that can be reused through all the environments. Even if you're not getting a full DevOps model in place yet, it’s critical that your production support people are working with you up front beginning with the development teams, which is how I actually started promoting the concepts. The concept of DevOps was because we needed to be able to really get in sync with what we wanted to do in production, as that was the end game. We needed people to be much closer together in alignment. That development was building things that were appropriate for production, provided the insights into the stability of the application, things like that. At the same time, we work on getting closer to a production-like environment all the way through.
There were things early where we couldn’t do a few things in Service Virtualization that have since been updated. The concern I have right now with Release Automation is the concept of what we call immutable objects, so I build it once in development, and then I move to all of my other environments. My challenge is looking at this from a perspective of “I'm kind of looking at … do I look at containers, do I look at what the RA type of product provides?” I also have to consider being cloud ready. As I deploy into an environment, I want to make sure I have enough of a stable and a repeatable environment type of model where once it comes out of development, I know that everything is staying the same. There’s different ways we can slice it, and depending on whether you do containers or a combination. That's some of the things I'm trying to understand more with Release Automation right now. I've been pretty happy with the product, I'm sure there are always things that we could ask for, but it's really done a nice job for us. It's interesting that it still takes teams a little bit to wrap their heads around. They're so used to kind of stubbing. I feel like the product has been able to scale with us, I think more of my challenges are how best to handle the processes. For example, who should be responsible for virtualizing services? I think that generally, the best thing would be for the middleware folks who are building a new service. They should also be responsible for creating the template virtualized service, and you build it right up front so people can start using it. I think there's a part of it where people could then also modify and update data, so there could be other types of responses for their scenarios, and it doesn't have to be done by the middleware folks. We went with a model of a center of excellence where they know the key, and then we start trying to educate and train other teams to build out more. Initially, we were not to that spot with the middleware teams for a variety of reasons, so we had to rely on the individual teams to build the services. There is what to be careful about - let's just say I have a customer lookup call, I really don't want to have to end up in a situation where two different UI teams who need to use the same customer lookup call did their own virtualizations of the same call. Those are some challenges for us that we've got to figure out. That's more procedural than it is limitations of the tool.
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CA Service Virtualization Consultants


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Kishore
1,312
POPULAR
Technical Consultant
- Middleware tester and implementor of virtual web services to different backends using ITKO CA LISA product. - QA Analyst performing the role of testing through most of the phases of Software development life cycle. - Developed and implemented an accounting application using Java and MS access... more>>
Reviewed CA Service Virtualization: We used CA Service Virtualization to overcome...
Anonymous avatar x100
782
Senior Test Automation Consultant
Test Automation - Framework design & development Test Automation (GUI, Web Services) using commercial and free tools (HP QTP/UFT, Selenium, Coded UI, CA LISA/DevTest, SoapUI, SilkTest) Application Lifecycle Management tools (HP Quality Center, Team Foundation Server) Continuous Integration... more>>
Add oscarbetgen2
271
Solution Consultant
A lot of experience on a lot of different environments, languages and techniques. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Key skills & knowledge: Hardware (OS): -PC (Windows, DOS, Linux) -Servers (zLinux (virtual servers on zVM) -Midrange... more>>
Reviewed CA Service Virtualization: If you need stubs for development/testing it's a...

What is CA Service Virtualization?

CA Service Virtualization acts as a catalyst for DevOps by simulating constrained or unavailable systems across the software development lifecycle (SDLC). This allows developers, testers and performance teams to work in parallel to accelerate app delivery, as well as to “shift-left” the app testing to improve application quality. CA Service Virtualization was previously known as LISA, the product from the ITKO acquisition.

Also known as
ITKO LISA, CA LISA
CA Service Virtualization customers

Union Bank, Swisscom, Autotrader, KPN, ING Bank, Best Buy, American Family Insurance, TESCO, Telefonica, Molina Healthcare, California DMV, Aktia, City Index, Con-way, DirecTV, GRU Airport, Liquidnet, NAB, Nordstrom, T-Mobile, TIM Brasil, 

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