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Microsoft Azure DevOps OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Microsoft Azure DevOps is the #1 ranked solution in our list of top Release Automation tools. It is most often compared to Jira: Microsoft Azure DevOps vs Jira

What is Microsoft Azure DevOps?

Azure DevOps Services is a cloud service for collaborating on code development. It provides an integrated set of features that you access through your web browser or IDE client, including the following:

  • Git repositories for source control of your code.
  • Build and release management to support continuous integration and delivery of your apps.
  • Agile tools to support planning and tracking your work, code defects, and issues using Kanban and Scrum methods.
  • A variety of tools to test your apps, including manual/exploratory testing, load testing, and continuous testing.
  • Highly customizable dashboards for sharing progress and trends.
  • Built-in wiki for sharing information with your team.

Microsoft Azure DevOps is also known as Azure DevOps, VSTS, Visual Studio Team Services, MS Azure DevOps.

Microsoft Azure DevOps Buyer's Guide

Download the Microsoft Azure DevOps Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: October 2021

Microsoft Azure DevOps Customers

Alaska Airlines, Iberia Airlines, Columbia, Skype

Microsoft Azure DevOps Video

Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Microsoft Azure DevOps pricing:
  • "It is the least expensive product in this class."

Microsoft Azure DevOps Reviews

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CR
Assurance Manager at a energy/utilities company with 5,001-10,000 employees
Real User
Robust functionality, good integration, continually enhanced, and easy to scale

Pros and Cons

  • "They have been lately adding features to the services on a regular basis. Every two weeks, they are adding functionality to Azure DevOps Services to match it with what Azure DevOps Server or on-prem would offer. So, we continue to get more robust functionality. My favorite right now is that they are starting to open up the API availability within Azure DevOps Services. Another thing that I like about Azure DevOps is that you can use it with any of the products that are on the market. You can integrate it with Jenkins and other open-source products to complete that fully functional CI, CD, CT, CM, and CS pipeline. It continues to enhance."
  • "We are currently in the process of moving all of our on-prem to the cloud platform. We are trying to make that move and host the majority of our DevOps services in the cloud because the cloud is where most of the things are going nowadays. However, the process of this transfer is not straightforward, and it could be a lot easier. Microsoft hasn't provided the maturity for migration tools. It could be a lot easier in that respect. I want to see them continue to advance the API capabilities. They could add some more robust functionality to the administrative layer within ADO services. There are a lot of configuration elements that you need to take care of at the organization level and the project configuration level from an administrative capacity. When you're dealing with process templates and things of that nature, you have to do them all manually. Being able to automate some of that using scripts or API functionality would be really nice."

What is our primary use case?

We're doing a full continuous integration (CI), continuous delivery (CD), continuous testing (CT), security, delivery, and monitoring.

We're currently using TFS 2013, TFS 2017, Azure DevOps Server 2019 update one, and Azure DevOps services, which is the SaaS cloud platform. I manage all of these.

It is deployed on Azure DevOps Server and Azure Services' private cloud.

What is most valuable?

They have been lately adding features to the services on a regular basis. Every two weeks, they are adding functionality to Azure DevOps Services to match it with what Azure DevOps Server or on-prem would offer. So, we continue to get more robust functionality.

My favorite right now is that they are starting to open up the API availability within Azure DevOps Services. 

Another thing that I like about Azure DevOps is that you can use it with any of the products that are on the market. You can integrate it with Jenkins and other open-source products to complete that fully functional CI, CD, CT, CM, and CS pipeline. It continues to enhance. 

What needs improvement?

We are currently in the process of moving all of our on-prem to the cloud platform. We are trying to make that move and host the majority of our DevOps services in the cloud because the cloud is where most of the things are going nowadays. However, the process of this transfer is not straightforward, and it could be a lot easier. Microsoft hasn't provided the maturity for migration tools. It could be a lot easier in that respect.

I want to see them continue to advance the API capabilities. They could add some more robust functionality to the administrative layer within ADO services. There are a lot of configuration elements that you need to take care of at the organization level and the project configuration level from an administrative capacity. When you're dealing with process templates and things of that nature, you have to do them all manually. Being able to automate some of that using scripts or API functionality would be really nice.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for about nine years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It has actually been pretty stable. Some of the early gen ones were not so stable. Before Microsoft started communicating with the end-users, they would make changes in the middle of the workday, which was a bit frustrating because things would change, which would impact the end customers because they weren't expecting that change. Microsoft wouldn't communicate with tenant administrators and tenant owners, but now, Microsoft has gotten a lot better about articulating their roadmap and communicating when those kinds of changes are coming down the pipeline. We are now able to communicate that out to our tenants and the end-users working within our projects. There is a lot better communication in that respect, which makes it easier for us to make customers aware of what might be coming, what is going to cause changes for them, what are the timeframes in which those things are going to hit their views, and what to expect from those things and additional functionalities.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

For the cloud, it has been really good. For on-prem too, it is easy enough to scale out. TFS also has always been pretty easy to scale out.

In terms of the number of users, currently, we're in a transition because we were just acquired by another company. So, we're leaving our parent company, and we're going to a new company. The numbers that I have are in flux. Our current numbers are at about 600 for just our existing or old company. I've been asked to stop onboarding my users and projects until we move our current organization into our new operational tenant in the new company, but I'm projecting that we'll have between 2,000 to 4,000 people.

How are customer service and technical support?

I use it all the time. They're very good when you get to the right queue. So, when it is working, it is great. I would rate them a nine and a half out of ten because I always think people have room for improvement, but they've been very good and supportive.

It works great for us especially now because we've kind of been divested from our old company to our new company. When we were with our old company, it was a little bit mired because of the way our enterprise architecture was. My requests didn't go to a North American team. It went to an EU team, and then I had to work within EU hours to get support, whereas I am in North America. That was a little tricky. Our old parent company was parented in the UK, Ireland, and Scotland.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I've used other solutions in tandem, and I have been an administrator for them. For example, I've used Jira and Confluence products, which is Atlassian. I've also used Remedy, but I'm not sure if they're still in the project management. I have also managed HP Performance Center and Tricentis. I've actually been administrating these for the last two years for this company.

I also use UCD, which is another very similar product. It does a lot of the same things and is also agnostic, just like Azure DevOps. You can use both of these with any of the products that are on the market.  

How was the initial setup?

It is pretty straightforward on the administrative side, but I've been working with this technology for a long time. It really falls in line with the majority of Microsoft products. If you're familiar with the Microsoft stack, it follows their pretty standard setup. You go through a similar process. It is just about knowing the nuances that Microsoft has when you're doing a farm configuration or a farm setup and the recommended prerequisites before you get started.

If we're talking about new end-users who are going from an older version of TFS to Azure DevOps Server or Azure DevOps Services, there is going to be a bit of a delta because the technology is different. There is a slight learning curve. Of course, it has got fancier bells and whistles and a jazzier user interface. It has softer edges and things have moved from left to right. Things that you found on the left side have again moved back over to the right side for administrative or usability functions. Your security elements and the things that you used to see on the left side have again switched back to the right side. These are the kinds of nuances about which you would need to educate your end-users. You need to get them used to the boards and how to use those. If your company is transitioning from a CMI model to an Agile model, it is going to be very important for the folks who are administrating your projects and your project managers to know how to configure the projects themselves, how to use Teams, and how to use permissions. Security becomes even more important because a lot of that really influences how you see the information within your project, and how you manage your boards, your sprints, and the work items that you allocate to your scrums or sprint users.

As you're going through different stages of your project, you have your pipelines and repos where your more development-centric users are going to be. I try to allocate out two different kinds of users that we're going to have and target them when I'm educating my folks. You have a kind of power user, and you have your regular contributor user. It is important to make this distinction because there are folks who are going to be doing basic or just regular contributor work. They will just contribute to the work items that are on a board or within a sprint. You're also going to have users who need to be slightly elevated, which is going to be that basic plus test plan. You need to understand how those affect your subscription and billing towards that subscription and how to manage that when they're not actively using it. You need to monitor this and enroll them back to a stakeholder so that you're not constantly incurring costs against your pay-as-you-go subscription costs. Everything is pay-as-you-go once you get into the cloud.

What other advice do I have?

I would ask those who are looking into implementing Microsoft Azure DevOps if they are already on the Microsoft stack of products. If they are, I would highly recommend them to use Azure DevOps Services or Azure DevOps, because they're already paying for that as part of their E-agreement. So, they should take full advantage of that because it is part of their licensing agreements. They should exploit what they're paying for because they are already paying a lot of money for Microsoft products.

Both UCD and ADO are the best products in the current DevOps space right now. They're both agnostic, and you can plug and play and integrate them with the majority of the tools in the market. You can integrate them with Jenkins and other open-source products, and open-source is where everything is going when you move to the cloud. Having that flexibility and viability within your company and business, no matter whether you're a small or large company, is a huge benefit. That will allow you to be flexible and deliver to on-prem or container.

Microsoft is extremely flexible, and they are listening to feedback and hearing what customers are saying. I've worked with Microsoft for almost 20 years now, but I took kind of a two-year sabbatical. Most of that time, I was developing out their SharePoint Online O365 platform. I stepped away for two years and then I transitioned over to DevOps because they really weren't taking feedback that was being provided by customers, and they were ignoring the customer experience, but their new CEO has kind of refocused Microsoft's outlook on the customer experience and is putting the priority back where it needs to be. They're doing a much better job in terms of incorporating feedback. They're continuing to advance and advent their product, and they are keeping ahead of and staying in touch with what technology is doing from a CI/CD pipeline perspective. This is why I am looking forward to continuing to use them.

I would rate Microsoft Azure DevOps a nine out of ten.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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IrvingGreen
Senior Director at Cloud Technovation
Real User
Top 20
Good for the staging environment through to the production environment

Pros and Cons

  • "Azure enables us to create a staging environment through to a production environment in an easier way and then get the code and run that."

    What is our primary use case?

    Building fast and reliable, amplified feedback loops in all stages of our software delivery and operations lifecycle. The business strives for built-in quality to ensure that everyone have correctly done their job. 

    I trust my team with peer reviews of our designs, code, test and infrastructure.

    How has it helped my organization?

    I'm familiar with Azure DevOps in the sense that my group directive has based the administration, architecture, and development on Azure. So whichever hat that I need to wear at the time that's the one I can wear.

    What is most valuable?

    I would say that Pipelines is Azure's most valuable feature. Also generally, Azure enables us to create a staging environment through to a production environment in an easier way and then get the code and run that. It also has decent pull requests and things like that.

    What needs improvement?

    Azure DevOps is a very cross-platform product. One of the issues that I have currently with the company is that they are using two different parts of technology. They were using JIRA for their sprint work and they were also using Confluence, as well as other Enterprise software. I advised them that all their sprint planning, backlog work, and everything else, can be done out of Azure DevOps from one central place. I know the Microsoft team will always look at improvements because I know that they are constantly looking at improvements to products while listening to their customers and looking at a global scale. I'm keeping my ear to the ground, as I always do.

    The product keeps evolving and at the moment there are a lot of good parts There are petabytes of data. Anytime somebody does a pull request or anything else, Microsoft is notified about it. So if somebody, somewhere is always looking at that and watching, that can be a revolutionary product. It's a product that can continuously grow and evolve in time. Even if it is not yet what you call a finished article, it's a growing and evolving product.

    Everybody has a slightly different take on what solutions or what part of the solution they would like to be improved. You can always improve a platform. Microsoft is always listening to customers and they will bring out a new version. The platform is quite user-friendly at the moment because you can use any program or language with it. You can't say you need another program, because as far as I'm concerned the main ones can be integrated with Azure. The newer ones like Go, as well as older ones like Python, Java, and PSP,  can all be integrated with that platform.

    I suppose when we hear about that release, I have no doubt that because Microsoft captures a lot of metrics and information that they monitor, like capturing data about what or how people use their product, they can see where the usage is and where they might want to remove a feature. That analysis and also comes from Microsoft's monitoring capabilities.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using this solution for five years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I thought it was very stable. They didn't have any shaky moments. Predominantly with Azure DevOps you need one thing only: a solid internet connection. If you've got a solid Internet connection, you just push everything up to the platform or run an integral request. I haven't had any issues with that. Some people might have, but it all comes down to their internet connection.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    This solution is extremely scalable.

    It helps a lot in Microservices or service technologies. Using the infrastructures of code enables a productivity increase of a thousand percent. I was speaking with a company that was pulling 12 requests at one time but using competitive technology like DevOps they were able to pull over 2000 requests at the same time. It's extremely scalable and you can use it to scale down when it needs it. It's a completely autonomous product, that allows you to scale whatever you need.

    I have five or six back end developers that use it every day. They learn every day, so whatever code or scripts they write are in Azure DevOps. They're not using any another tool to do it, they are pulling it with the platform because you can't tell other people about a platform if you aren't using it yourself. The first thing they do is log on to DevOps.

    There will be an increase in our usage of the product. We are looking to expand at some point. The more people that come on board, the more use there is for the product.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    We haven't had a requirement to contact their technical support. I have contacted their technical support before under some other projects and got a really good response from the person on the other end of the phone. They are always looking to help you solve more solutions as quickly as they possibly can.

    I don't think I have had a bad experience; I've always had continuity. They were able to get me the problem resolved, whether it was a P1 or P4 issue. I've never had a problem with the technical support.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I have experience with Amazon Web Services. As the Azure product has matured a lot in the last two to three years, it deserves its market share at the moment. We were using other products, like Visual Studio, a web service which is an old name for Visual DevOps. We were also using things like Team Foundation Server (TFS). We were just using some of the older tech.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup was straightforward.

    What about the implementation team?

    We did the implementation ourselves.

    I'm working on the high-level design and the low-level design so I know where we're going to start, and whether we've got a blank slate. I've worked with many firms in the past and companies have their own design in place. Usually, some of these companies material is outdated and Microsoft will probably move the bar several times. We are Microsoft accredited so we stay in touch with the technology more recently than most. We've constantly been informed of the latest technology and the latest products that are evolving on the platform. That includes those that are in preview, which I hope will become available, as well as those that are going to be deprecated. We're basically in full harmony with Microsoft and their products.

    What was our ROI?

    We most definitely achieved an ROI.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    Check out the pricing information from Azure Cost and analysis information.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    No Visual Studio Team Services and Visual code were the preferred options.

    What other advice do I have?

    The first thing that I would suggest is to read the documentation for the platform. The online documentation changes pretty much every other week; there is always something new coming out. Practice, practice, and practice. Test, practice, and repeat. You need to know your way around the platform and the only way to do that is by hands-on practice. You can't break the environment, but you can speed things up on the thirteenth hour. It depends on how you configure things since every configuration is different. It's an excellent product that is taking into account current technology, yet also flexible enough to use with future technology.

    At the moment I would rate Azure DevOps as a nine out of ten. The reason I wouldn't give anything a ten is because it's constantly evolving. There is room for improvement, as this is not the finished article at all. The reason I would give it a nine is the information to get the best usage out of the product is readily available. I've been using Microsoft tech for over 25 years now and back in the day it was difficult to get information out of Microsoft even when you were an MCPN. You would have a special link to go through a Microsoft back door to gain information. That's completely different to the advice that you would get related to Microsoft.com. Now Microsoft is completely different with everything readily available. You can download it in pdot format and the document could be 2000-3000 pages. They leave no stone unturned.

    The only problem I would say at the moment is a friend of mine said that the Microsoft test book is taking a long time to come out because he wants to take the exam. Some people need to read the information and retain the information that way. Sometimes you go on these courses that are not run by Microsoft directly. They can be very flaky and don't have all the information or experience of using the product in normal working life.

    If there is anything I would ask for, it's to get the documentation out on hardback so that we can add it to our libraries. That would be very good.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Public Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Microsoft Azure
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Learn what your peers think about Microsoft Azure DevOps. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: October 2021.
    540,984 professionals have used our research since 2012.
    EC
    IT Project Manager at a energy/utilities company with 10,001+ employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Integrates well with other tools, and enables us to perform different functions within one tool

    Pros and Cons

    • "I like the fact that there is built-in Power BI. Both are Microsoft tools. So, you can incorporate dashboard capabilities."
    • "The tool was developed for Agile project methodology, but I've noticed that there has also been a try to incorporate what is typically done in MS Project, which is for more sequential Waterfall projects. The problem with that is that it is half-baked for Waterfall projects. If you're going to do it, then either go all the way and allow us to use the tool for both or don't do it at all."

    What is our primary use case?

    It is used to manage our projects. We basically maintain what would be the equivalent of our project schedules for various projects. So, we capture or create user stories to identify elements that need to be accomplished for the delivery of a project and to track who is responsible for it and the level of effort. We aggregate that within the tool and report out to leadership about the status of when we anticipate completion.

    We are using its latest version.

    How has it helped my organization?

    Its integration with different functions has been very helpful. Previously, we had Microsoft Project schedules, and we did our reporting by using Excel and PowerPoint presentations. We also did testing tracking in other tools, such as HP ALM. Our source code was on Teams Foundation Server. All that can now be done within DevOps, which is a huge benefit. Things that we used to do in different tools can now be done in one tool. 

    What is most valuable?

    I like the fact that there is built-in Power BI. Both are Microsoft tools. So, you can incorporate dashboard capabilities. 

    I also like the integration with the other toolsets, such as Outlook and GitHub. You can do your testing and check your source code within the same tool. That's definitely something really good.

    What needs improvement?

    The tool was developed for Agile project methodology, but I've noticed that there has also been a try to incorporate what is typically done in MS Project, which is for more sequential Waterfall projects. The problem with that is that it is half-baked for Waterfall projects. If you're going to do it, then either go all the way and allow us to use the tool for both or don't do it at all.

    One thing we had to customize ourselves was to create the critical path. You can't do your project dependencies within the tool. We tried using the tool for a Waterfall project, and we had to find a custom approach to do that because. There should be some functionality for the reporting and dependency tracking for the Waterfall projects.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I have been working with this solution for two to three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    So far, so good. It has definitely been sized appropriately for our use. We haven't had any issues with it.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We've only been using it for about three years, and so far, it seems to be able to adapt to our growth. We're maturing into it. We're moving in the direction of using it more, and I feel confident that it'll scale appropriately.

    We have at least a hundred people using the tool. There are different degrees of people who are using it. Some people are using it in the read mode or view mode to keep themselves informed of where things are. We have some project managers who actually use the tool, and then we have a couple of administrators. I'm one of the administrators for our program. I have a couple of vendor or partner folks who are also administrators. We also have a development team that does some customizations on the dashboard and the Power BI reports that we do. These are pretty much different roles or layers that we have.

    We do grant developers access to be able to make their own updates within the tool. Typically, project managers or scrum masters do that, but we also have some team members who are on these projects and have enough understanding of how the tool works and how we're using it. They are able to do their own reporting and their own updates on their statuses.

    In terms of plans to increase its usage, we're moving in that direction. Most of our projects are done in Microsoft waterfall project management schedules, but we are being encouraged to move over to more of an Agile approach on our project methodology. Our mandate is that if you're going to do anything Agile, use the DevOps tool.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I have not interacted with them. We have a sort of layer for support. I have had to reach out to one of the three resources that we have. He is our true admin at the company who had to reach out to their support, but it has been seldom, at least from my experience.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I used Jira while working with a vendor that we had here for one of our projects. They brought that tool from their practice. We were doing that because we had not yet moved to DevOps. After they rolled it out at the organization level, the mandate was to stop using Jira and switch over to Azure DevOps. There are a lot of benefits to Azure DevOps over Jira, but Jira is the one that has a lot of market share on that side.

    How was the initial setup?

    I wasn't involved in that, but I do know that, just like many tools, there is a learning curve that was associated with that. I have used Jira before, so I had more or less an understanding because it is very similar to Jira, but I know that for other people I work with, it was a completely new concept to use something like this.

    For its maintenance, we have a small team. We have about three individuals who do the backend support. So, it is minimal. Obviously, if they have any escalations, then they do go to Microsoft, but we haven't had that happen. It was very minimal. There are plugins that are available to enhance kind of some capabilities of the tool. When we ask for that type of functionality, these three individuals have been able to implement plugins for us.

    What other advice do I have?

    It is an Agile tool. We were using the tool calling that we were Agile, but we were really doing things in the Waterfall methodology. It was our square peg in the round hole, and that's where I realized that we didn't have the capabilities in DevOps to use it as a Waterfall tool, which makes sense because Agile is a different approach. We've evolved since then, and now, we're doing a bit more Agile when we use the tool. So, a tool is just a tool. There has to be that thinking alignment. Otherwise, it is a square peg in a round hole, and it doesn't quite fit. Your organization and your team have to understand that. Just using the tool doesn't make you agile.

    The only problem we had was when we rolled this out, we didn't realize how Waterfall we really were. So, I had to go back and have PMs create additional data elements for us to capture what we really wanted to capture to report in Waterfall. Dependencies weren't tracked, and we had to go back. It almost felt like we had to do rework, and people weren't too happy about that.

    I haven't used its mobile device capabilities, but that's definitely something that I would hope to evaluate in the future. 

    I would rate Microsoft Azure DevOps an eight out of 10. Overall, I'm pleased with the tool, but there is definitely some room for improvement.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Private Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Microsoft Azure
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Flag as inappropriate
    CW
    Software Engineering Manager at a healthcare company with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    Provides the best full integration feature on the market; our most important tool

    Pros and Cons

    • "This is an all-in-one, one-stop shop, nothing comes close."
    • "Project management could be improved."

    What is our primary use case?

    We're using Azure DevOps Services for three things: First, for project management, second, for storing the source code, similar to GitHub Repository, and finally, we use it as our CICD build server or build environment, which builds for us and runs tests and so on. In general, these are the three main use cases for this product. We are large customers of Microsoft and we're on a corporate level with them. We pay extra for support. I'm a software engineer manager. 

    What is most valuable?

    I like that this solution is all-in-one, a one-stop-shop, it's the killer feature. I haven't seen anything that comes close. I guess GitHub will be close soon, but that's it, there's really nothing right now for that full integration. Other solutions require three tools so this is really a great feature. The solution has a better user interface and better CICD tools compared to what we used previously when we ran TeamCity. I think it scores higher on most things, including better developer ergonomics. Since it's Git-based, there's no training because everyone uses Git. I've found it to also be very customizable so that on all points it's better. This is an important tool for us. 

    What needs improvement?

    This solution is not as good as Jira when it comes to project management and I think they know it, but it's good enough. I'm very used to it now, so I can work more quickly, but I've had colleagues who are very Jira-focused and they don't like Azure DevOps at all. When it comes to the handling of tickets or tasks or the product backlog, Jira is much more customizable and more intuitive. It's an area that Microsoft could improve. 

    The instructions could be a little better. We are doing some weird stuff where we're building some things, including embedded firmware. It wasn't super intuitive to set that up which was an issue although it's something minor and we managed to solve it. I just expected it to be a little easier, although it's not what the solution is built for. We're going a little out of the normal use case. It is a little clunky compared to Jira and hosting your own builds could be a little easier.

    I'm aware that they're putting money into GitHub to add more features around vulnerability scans and statical analysis and so on, basically taking on cloud and what have you, as well as Vericode that we are using. It would be great if it was built into the tool. I get things from other vendors that are provided out of the box, and it would be awesome for me to have that with DevOps. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using this solution for several years. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability of the solution is good. We've had a couple of dashboards out and they have a nice page share where they show what's out and what's not. A few months back they had some issues with the Active Directory and we were pretty much locked out of some things. We lost Teams for a while and we use that a lot in Azure DevOps. It was quickly fixed. Otherwise, I'm very happy with the stability. 

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The scalability of the solution is good and there's no maintenance required. We're a small operation and we could grow by a factor of 10 and it wouldn't be a problem. This is an SaaS and if you need to take care of it, there's something wrong. We use the solution extensively and soon we'll have almost every piece of software, including all our test automation and embedded firmware there so we'll be increasing usage. 

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    The company previously used TeamCity, and I have used Jenkins in the past, the grandfather of everything. Azure DevOps is nicer. Jenkins is very configurable, but a pain. I like Azure a lot more and I think this or something like it, GitHub Actions, for example, is the future.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup is very intuitive. What I think they could work on is the whole permissions model where you have projects and other things which require permissions and which is not very intuitive. You can do almost everything but I want a more granular permissions model that's also easy to maintain. I don't quite like the way it's set up so there's some work to be done there. I think I'd rather do it in text because it's hard to see everything clearly otherwise. If you have a complex permissions system, it's complex to set up and it's not super intuitive. Compared to AWS, which is a very different system, that aspect of Azure is not very intuitive.

    I work in an engineering department so we didn't feel the need to get any help with deployment. If you read the manual, create the sandbox, and test it out you're able to roll it out. It's not that hard. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    We're not paying a lot for this product. As developers, we have a Visual Studio license which is basically free. That's how their licensing model works. Then we have a number of stakeholders who need to do edits in the system, but not work with code necessarily. I believe they're paying $5 a month per user. We also have users who only need to read things and don't need code so I set that up for everyone who needs it. We're probably paying a few hundred dollars per month altogether. That's a minor cost for us; we're not currently hosting anything on cloud, so it's a small cost compared to hosting a solution. 

    We ran into a few things where we had to pay more because of the number of concurrent building agents. We had capped it low and the developer was unhappy so we paid a little more to get what we needed and that's been good. I don't like it when you get a big bill and you don't know about it. 

    What other advice do I have?

    I'm somewhat critical of the documentation for certain things, but overall, the documentation is really good. In general, Microsoft is really good at documentation. It's worth taking a few hours to read it and then you'll know a little about how Access works. If you set up a sandbox, you're not going to destroy anything and you'll learn by trying things out. I would still read the documentation and go in parallel so you can at least know enough and be aware that it's safe to get in there.

    We are very heavy users in creating small projects and then sometimes deleting them because they weren't useful but I like that model. Create a little sandbox and go build. We have done our own workflows and they are always tested in a sandbox before going live. That would be my suggestion. 

    I rate the solution eight out of 10.  

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Public Cloud
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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    BG
    Chief Digital Officer (CDO) at a financial services firm with 201-500 employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Easy to use, stable, and helps speed up production

    Pros and Cons

    • "Typically the sprints themselves and managing the tasks have essentially eliminated our need for reporting."
    • "Some of the queries, the way they're built, need to be looked at. We need better query tools."

    What is our primary use case?

    We primarily use the solution for our Agile teams, however, we started off using it with our executive suite. Our executive team now meets in sprints every day. Sometimes it's a short 15 minutes, other times it can be up to an hour. We have two-week sprints and daily scrums associated with it. We've also rolled that down from the executive. We've got seven formal Agile teams running throughout the organization across our businesses. We probably have at least 40% of our staff now trained in Agile and using DevOps to execute the projects.

    How has it helped my organization?

    As an Agile team, we're now able to move much faster than we could, even pre-COVID.

    What is most valuable?

    Typically the sprints themselves and managing the tasks have essentially eliminated our need for reporting. That in itself has had a huge effort on the number of meetings. In the past, you would almost wait a month before you could get all the executive teams together. Now, we've got meetings daily. Due to the regular meetings, we're utilizing daily scrums and two-week sprints, and we've been able to move a lot faster than we've ever had before as far as initiatives. 

    Frankly, throughout this whole COVID situation, being able to respond the way we have to some of the changes that were going on has been amazing. I don't think that would have happened if we weren't an Agile team.

    What needs improvement?

    There are a lot of features that we could probably work with a bit differently as we learn more about the tool. Right now, we're just really using it from a task management perspective. We've only been using it a year. There may still be more to learn and unpack.

    Some of the queries, the way they're built, need to be looked at. We need better query tools.

    Being able to report back to boards, to regulators, and the activities and stuff would be helpful. The queries do require somebody else to actually write them. There should, however, be a way to make things a little simpler in that space. Right now it's on us to figure out how to get better at making queries effectively and in such a way we're just not reporting on tasks complete.  

    We track the associated feature story. In many ways you can actually go back and see the story, and see the progress you've made on initiatives due to the fact that you can see all the decisions that have been made along the way. If there's a way that person could dig into that and pull more information or insights, that would be very helpful as it would assist us in improving future projects or even help us forecast on an existing project. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I use the solution daily. We launched it in the company in January. We've been using it across all our Agile teams here for 12 months here.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    The stability of the solution is very good. I haven't had issues with bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze. It's a reliable solution.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    The solution's level of scalability is good. We're a smaller organization. We've only got 300 people in total, and out of those, probably 40% of our entire staff use the product. About 120 people probably are in there on a daily basis. That's everyone from executives down to programmers. It's extremely cross-functional across our organization.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I haven't had to reach out to DevOps themselves personally, so I wouldn't have experience there. However, if we ran into any issues, my technology teams would contact them.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We didn't previously use a different solution. That's why we looked for an automation tool. We switched to DevOps mostly due to the fact that our development team was utilizing DevOps as part of their own Agile operations. A number of teams were also already sort of experienced. There are a number of individuals in the company who were experienced that way, and we had homegrown support in some ways when we launched it. It just made sense to go with DevOps as opposed to bringing in something new.

    How was the initial setup?

    The initial setup wasn't complex. It was pretty straightforward. We didn't run into any issues that complicated the process of implementation.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We did look at Jira briefly, however, it didn't look that different from DevOps and we knew many of our team members were already comfortable with this solution so we didn't pursue it.

    What other advice do I have?

    We're just Microsoft customers. We don't have any business relationship with the company.

    I'm not sure which version of the solution we're using.

    I'd strongly recommend the solution to other organizations. I can't see us ever reversing back now after being on this for a year.

    Overall, I would rate the solution at an eight out of ten. It's relatively easy to use and it does what we need it to do.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Public Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Microsoft Azure
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    DemisewAbera
    DevOps Engineer at Simprints
    Real User
    Top 10
    The least expensive of the competitors in this class continues to develop and benefits Microsoft users

    Pros and Cons

    • "Azure is an advantage when working with other Microsoft solutions."
    • "Azure has not yet advanced to the performance level of the other major competitors and is missing integration with important technologies."

    What is our primary use case?

    I took a part-time job doing a mentorship to guide the students on how to use cloud computing on the AW and Azure cloud resources. For that project, we go through each and every service on cloud computing that is part of the service platform. The new technology is called server-less technology. The goal of the mentorships is showing students how to fundamentally use these resources and explain the advantages and disadvantages of cloud computing over on-premises solutions.  

    What is most valuable?

    Currently, I do not know if there is really a single feature that stands out as the most valuable. If you consider our use case and that we were using Azure essentially as a teaching tool, it was the tool itself that was valuable.  

    I do not have in-depth experience with Microsoft Azure, but it is like other services such as AWS. Currently, the number of services are increasing on Azure actually at a faster rate than with Google Cloud. If you are working with Microsoft products like Office 365 the best cloud solution would be on Azure services. The cost is also better than AWS.  

    Microsoft has also built an association with other cloud products for helping to migrate your licenses to the cloud. This works out well if you have a substantial investment in licensing for Microsoft products on-premises. Being able to bring that license to the cloud is a good transitionary solution.  

    What needs improvement?

    I have been running reports on the availability of the major competitors in the cloud services to use as a demonstration in webinars and comparison of services. The most available solution on the cloud in user availability by minutes is Google Cloud. Google is the number one solution and the second one is AWS. The third one is Microsoft Azure.  

    Compared to the availability of the other two major cloud solutions, Microsoft Azure needs to make an improvement in their availability. This report suggests that the Azure team needs to do some major changes to match the availability of the other services and make the product more competitive.  

    In DevOps (software development and IT operations), server-less architecture and QNX platform integrations are things that need to be added to Azure. Currently, I am not sure that this is the case. But previously, I have had experience trying to use Azure with service and integration with the QNX platform and it is not as good as Google Cloud. Azure has improved its current set of data services on the cloud. But Google Cloud is doing more right now to bring those technologies and make them available to developers or enterprise solutions. So, QNX integration needs polishing.  

    For how long have I used the solution?

    We have been using the product for only the last two months.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    I have not experienced any issues with stability.  

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    In general, I have seen no real issues with scalability. It is a cloud platform and scalability should usually be available on demand.  

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I used Google Cloud on one of my previous projects but currently, we are using the on-premise solution. So we are hosting everything locally on-premises. We do not have any current cloud provider for the business as a whole. We are using AWS for security and backup for the production environment but mostly we rely on the on-premise solutions at the moment.  

    We use the S3 compute instance of AWS only. We do not use any other AWS services. We just use VM's that we create on the S3 instance.  

    How was the initial setup?

    Setup is not so much of an issue as the product is on the cloud. The services are essentially on demand for the product. What you do with the services is what may take more time and consideration.  

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I am not comfortable sharing the details of cost because there may be different pricing schemes, but compared to AWS, Azure is less expensive. So in the pricing in this class of services, Azure is good. It can work well for small to medium enterprises. But this solution is may not be good for those who are not enterprise-level users. Small cloud computing providers have better pricing than the bigger cloud computing providers like AWS and Microsoft Azure and may be a better choice for non-enterprise use.  

    Still, Azure is priced better than AWS. Price may not be the only thing to consider.  

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    I have had the opportunity to use a variety of different solutions and it has not really come down to a situation where one is replaced with another. There is an ongoing evaluation of the products as newer technology including the most well known, like AW, Google, and Azure. AWS is the most expensive cloud hosting. In my estimation, that is the best product right now, but things are changing quickly.  

    What other advice do I have?

    On a scale from one to ten where one is the worst and ten is the best, I would rate Microsoft Azure DevOps as an eight-out-of-ten. It is not quite up to the level of other offerings in some ways but it is improving all the time.  

    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    OB
    Director - Quality Management at a performing arts with 1,001-5,000 employees
    Real User
    Top 20
    Good user interface, easy to implement, and offers good reporting

    Pros and Cons

    • "The solution is easy to implement and easy to use."
    • "One thing I would note is that it's hard to know what is included or not in the product. Especially when you begin to try and compare it to other solutions. When you go to a site like VersionOne, they tell you Azure DevOps doesn't have this or that, and when you go to Microsoft, it says VersionOne doesn't have this or that. They could do a better job of laying out exactly what is on offer so customers know going in exactly what they'll get."

    What is most valuable?

    The most valuable aspect of the solution is the complete tool orchestration within the DevOps. It's great for operations, monitoring, and building tests for deployment.

    I like the user interface. It's excellent.

    The solution is easy to implement and easy to use.

    We've been using their documentation seamlessly. It's been great.

    I love it because we have Microsoft Exchange Office 365 and we have all those reports already in place (especially if you're using quality reporting). We get that as an add-on. It comes within the package, so everything is very compatible. The analytics on offer are also very good.

    The solution offers great plugins and has great integration capabilities. It runs on configuration management tools like Ansible and Puppet. The monitoring they have for plugins is also excellent. 

    Whatever you might need, they seem to have it.

    What needs improvement?

    We're quite happy with the tool right now. We're not really using it too much. We are also just starting on it, to be honest, so what we've needed so far we've found that it offers. There isn't anything missing that I can see. 

    One thing I would note is that it's hard to know what is included or not in the product. Especially when you begin to try and compare it to other solutions. When you go to a site like VersionOne, they tell you Azure DevOps doesn't have this or that, and when you go to Microsoft, it says VersionOne doesn't have this or that. They could do a better job of laying out exactly what is on offer so customers know going in exactly what they'll get.

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using the solution for three years.

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    In terms of stability, I would say we have no problem with the solution. We have been using the tool for all of our projects and we have no problems with that aspect. If users use virtual missions when they run the testing, everything is even easier.

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    Scalability, at least for the time that we have been using the solution, hasn't been a problem. We are able to adjust and expand any time of VMs. Any organization that needs to grow its usage should be able to do so easily.

    Currently, 40 people are using the solution for one of the projects we're running. We have whoever you could think of in an agile team on it. Everybody from the business analyst to the product managers, to the testers, to the developers, and even to business end-users are on it.

    I'm not sure if our organization plans on expanding its usage in the future.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    I've never personally had to contact technical support, and I haven't heard from anyone in my team about any negative results. I'm not sure if I'd be able to evaluate their services at this time.

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    We previously used Jira, however, we have not switched over completely to Azure DevOps. We now use both.

    How was the initial setup?

    With manuals, the implementation is much easier. It is quite straightforward.

    We are not doing any kind of maintenance on the solution. We don't need to because it's so fast. We are not paying for everything in terms of infrastructure development. 

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    I'm not sure about the pricing. It's not an aspect of the solution I currently deal with.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We're currently looking at VersionOne and CollabNet just to see how they compare to what we currently use, which includes Microsoft Azure DevOps.

    I'm new to this company. I've been here only for a year. The previous company, I was using Agile Central, which I really liked because of the user interface. Central was previously called Rally. However, after coming to this company, as they have Jira, I've been using Jira and also, for this one project, Microsoft Azure DevOps. I need to begin considering what I should do at an enterprise level. I'm looking at a variety of options including Microsoft DevOps, VersionOne, CollabNet, and a few more. 

    Since we have Microsoft Azure DevOps already in place, I would like something that's similar and competitive. 

    What other advice do I have?

    I'm not sure which version of the solution we're using at this time.

    I personally just love using Microsoft DevOps. I would recommend the solution to anyone. Organizations considering the solution should just go for it and they should get the complete orchestration.

    I'd rate the solution eight out of ten. I don't think that I have explored everything extensively yet. Any product definitely will have its own gaps, and since I'm not in a position to understand it 100%, I want to play it safe on ranking it at eight.

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Public Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Microsoft Azure
    Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
    Rodrigo Bassani
    Head Of Technology at Elogroup
    Reseller
    Top 5
    Excellent integration; enables us to see all the steps in the lifecycle of our clients

    Pros and Cons

    • "Provides us with user histories."
    • "Templates could be improved."

    What is our primary use case?

    The first time I used the solution was to create a build for an Oracle application called SOA. We generated all the features in Azure DevOps to create the build and then we created a workflow. We are partners of Microsoft and I'm head of technology.

    How has it helped my organization?

    We have the histories, and are able to estimate the efforts of each story. It means that I can measure it from each developer and I have the match from each developer. We can also check it from the lead time to see whether there are any problems in storage that may not be mature. It gives us control. 

    What is most valuable?

    We use Gitch as a version control and the integration is very good. We are also using the features for the product backlog that's released every day so we have the user histories. We can track it from the histories to the code. You can see all the steps in the life cycle we use with our clients. We also like to use the estimate integration feature where you have two or three developers that estimate different efforts for each history. I think Azure is easy to integrate with any other type of solution to improve your delivery.

    What needs improvement?

    I think the templates could be improved. It's not easy making the jump from one project to another so we're now integrating using a different partner. I believe the price could be improved when scaling. It's a simple calculation, the number of users times $11, which is approximately the cost. But if you have a large number of users you should be able to reduce the per user cost the more you scale. I think it's something Microsoft could do for us. 

    For how long have I used the solution?

    I've been using this solution for five years. 

    What do I think about the stability of the solution?

    This is a very mature and stable solution. 

    What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

    We have about 100 users; developers, engineers and admin. The platform doesn't require any maintenance but we have one DevOps engineer to support the DevOps for the applications that we integrate with the platform. There are two types of scalability, the first is scaling my team, moving from 100 to 200 users, which is easy to do. The second is structure but  I haven't yet tested scalability in terms of increased structure.

    How are customer service and technical support?

    Actually, we don't have a lot of experience opening tickets with technical support. All tickets that we did open were dealt with quickly. 

    Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

    I used IBM where I worked previously but didn't have a lot of experience with it. 

    How was the initial setup?

    We had some initial difficulties, because the solution is not commonly used here. Jira and Microsoft are the most common solutions but it's not usual to use everything inside the platform. It was a cultural change that we implemented here in our team and to convince them was more difficult than to use the platform itself. We used an integrator for deployment but we don't do that in every case. In some of our deployments, hosting the most popular software development languages, like Java or .NET makes it easy to create the deployment mode. But when you have different platforms on development, it's more difficult to configure. We're on an SaaS platform, so deployment was very easy.

    What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

    We have 100 users and the cost is $11 per user. There's an additional cost if you want to use the integrated test plan. You have the option to just change your license and you can use the automated test integrator.

    Which other solutions did I evaluate?

    We looked at Jira Confluence and it was our second option. On Jira, we have our environment in Azure, and it was easier to adopt Azure DevOps instead of Confluence. Because Confluence is specifically for Azure DevOps, we can integrate it with everything that we are already using.

    What other advice do I have?

    It's very easy to start using this solution because the first five licenses are free. As a result, it's easy to track and compare with other solutions and it's easy to scale. 

    I would rate this solution a nine out of 10. 

    Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

    Public Cloud

    If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

    Microsoft Azure
    Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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