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Application Security Python Reviews

Showing reviews of the top ranking products in Application Security, containing the term Python
Veracode: Python
Senior Security Analyst at a wellness & fitness company with 1,001-5,000 employees

Previously used Burp Suite, OWASP Zed Attack Proxy, Python scripts / Powershell and Batch, Retire.JS, Vulners, and Wappalyzer browser plugins.

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AS
DevSecOps Consultant at a comms service provider with 10,001+ employees

We use the Veracode SAST solution to scan the Java, Node.js, and Python microservices as part of our CI/CD pipeline, wherein we are using our CI/CD server as Bamboo, Jenkins, and GitLab CI/CD. 

We have teams for both our cloud pipeline and on-prem pipeline, and both teams use this solution. We are using Veracode to constantly run the internal application source code and ensure the code's security hygiene.

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SM
Principal for the Application Security Program and Access Control at a engineering company with 10,001+ employees

When we go from the dynamic scan to static scan to SCA, there is a huge change in the UI. This was not relayed to us when we were buying the product nor during the demo. They mentioned, "Yeah, this was an acquisition. The third-party library scanner was an acquisition from SourceClear."

You can see there is a huge difference in the user experience in terms of both the display as well as the usability of the product. That is one of our pet peeves: They are not normalizing the UI across the three product segments. We had numerous calls with them early on because we were new to the platform. The sales team is not aligned with the support team. The support team keeps telling us to use a different UI versus the one that the sales team showcased during the sales cycle.

There is much to be desired of UI and user experience. The UI is very slow. With every click, it just takes a lot of time for the pages to load. We have seen this consistently since getting this solution. The UI and UX are very disjointed. It is ironic that they claim themselves as agile AppSec tool, but their UI doesn't reflect that.

We had a couple of consulting calls, and perhaps it may be the engineers that we got, they were not really up to speed with our frameworks. They were very focused on .NET and Java, which are legacy frameworks for us. We don't use these at all in our code base. We are using the newer, modern web frameworks, like Django. They have very little coverage or knowledge base on these, especially on the mobile side.

There are a lot of faults with the Static Analysis Pipeline Scan tool. Their tool seems to be very good with legacy products, which are developed in .NET and Java frameworks, but there are false positives when it comes to using modern web frameworks, like Python and Django. The C++ code doesn't even scan. We have spent at least three weeks worth of time going back and forth because it won't support the use cases that we have.

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Cybersecurity Expert at PSYND

The most valuable feature is actually the support provided by Veracode. Once you start to use the platform, you can mount the IDE plugin for your script. The advantage is that you can run the scan and check what the problem is and you can fix it yourself. Support could be used to address something that could go beyond your skills. If you use Veracode Greenlight, you have a small pop-up that you can use to interact directly with the team and you can ask a consultant to advise how an issue can be fixed. One of the good things about the Greenlight plugin is that it is very simple. There are several guides that tell you how to install it. It's a matter of one or two minutes and you are ready to go.

Once you check something, they provide links, not manually, it's all automated. When you want to check into a vulnerability you click and open the website where there is a description. If this is not enough of an answer, you can ask directly by scheduling an appointment with a Veracode guy.

Another feature of Veracode is that they provide e-learning, but the e-learning is not basic, rather it is quite advanced. They don't teach you how to develop in Java, Python, PHP or C#, but they instruct you about the best practices that should be adopted for secure code developing and how to prevent improper management of some component of the code that could lead to a vulnerability. The e-learning that Veracode provides is an extremely good tool. And as far as I know, there are no other competitors that offer it.

The best stuff is the training: this enables your team to adopt the same programming approach, although these people have a different background or joined the projects in a different phase. Doing that, they can take the training and be aligned so that they all write code in a good way.

We also use the Static Analysis Pipeline Scan and it's quite good. They provide several of the most common templates for pipelines. You see the process, while you program, right up until you package an application, and that the platform is able to detect things that are a blocking point. Before deploying to the production, you already know what is doing. And the speed of the Pipeline Scan is quite good.

Another good feature is the policy reporting for ensuring compliance with industry standards and regulations. We test compliance for medical devices, for GDPR, and for payment methods. These are all good. If you are not correctly prepared on one of these sets of regulations, you know that Veracode is going to take care of it using pre-prepared templates. But we can also customize our own policy if we are facing a unique use case. Even if it's not really common, we can take a regulation and build it the way we want it to look.

In addition, you can check everything from the dashboard. Veracode provides a web portal that is connected with your account and through that you can check the status of all the deployments that were run. And suppose you also have an application that is quite complex. You can deploy and upload it through the portal. When it is ready, you receive a notification from the portal that the job has been done and that you can check the results. When you go to the dashboard, you have the OWASP vulnerabilities. There is a really simple graphic with the colors showing how many vulnerabilities have been found and how much these vulnerabilities are repeated in your code. It also tells you the potential effect, if it is a backdoor data breach, for example, etc. It also suggests what you can do to remediate. It might suggest modifying code or changing the status of some part of the development, or updating a third-party.

And if you have people on different projects, there is also a role management feature, so you can select, for example, that people who are working on a given project can only see that project. If you are running something with different levels of classifications, for example, if you have an external consultant, it does not affect the confidentiality of the system. When people are collaborating, not all people are at the same level of an NDA. It is good that each person can see only their part implementing Need-To-Know.

It also integrates with developer tools. We use IntelliJ and Eclipse, among others.

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Manager, Information Technology at Broadcom Corporation

When it comes to the speed of the pipeline scan, one of the things we have found with Veracode is that it's very fast with Java-based applications but a bit slow with C/C++ based applications. So we have implemented the pipeline scan only for Java-based applications not for the C/C++ applications.

For C++ based languages, or languages where there is a platform dependency—for example, if I write C language code it is dependent on whether I'm executing that on Windows, or on Linux, or another platform—and with some of these platforms-specific languages, Veracode makes something called debug symbols that are introduced into the code. That gets cumbersome. They could improve that or possibly automate. If Veracode could quickly analyze the code and make file-line flags, that would be great. It is easy to do for Java, Python, and Pearl, but not so easy for C++. So when it comes to the debug symbols, guidance or automation could be improved.

Also, scan completion, as well scanning progress, is not reported accurately. Sometimes the scan says it will complete in two to three hours but it will take four or five hours. That is one of the areas where they can give a more accurate estimate.

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Acunetix by Invicti: Python
Senior Test Engineer II at a financial services firm with 201-500 employees

The scanning speed could be faster. It digs really deep, so that could be one of the reasons why it takes a while. If I want to scan an application, it's going to take over three to four hours. That's something I think they could improve.

Instead of posting hundreds of requests to find the vulnerability, if it simply had the capability to find that particular vulnerability in the payload itself, that would make a big impact.

The vulnerability identification speed should be improved. It takes more time compared to other tools I have used. 

Simply put, Acunetix passes too many payloads in order to identify one part of the ratio. That's probably why it can take a while to identify a particular issue. Other tools are able to identify vulnerabilities with just a few requests. Acunetix takes more time to make certain if a vulnerability exists. That's one of the areas which they can improve on.

The scan configuration could be improved. The first thing that we need to do is set up a site policy and a scan policy. By site policy, I mean we have to choose what kind of technology our site is developed with so that it will only pass payloads related to that technology.

For example, if I'm using MySQL or Python as my backend database, it will only check payloads related to MySQL or Python; it won't check Java or other programming languages.

We have to define the scanning configuration as well as the site configuration each and every time. This has to be done whenever we are adding a new set of sites or domains.

Other tools provide a list of predefined scan policies, but with Acunetix, we have to create our own every time. We have to spend a lot of time setting up these configurations, rather than just picking them from a vast variety of predefined sets of configurations, which is much easier.

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Klocwork: Python
SP
Deputy Manager Quality Assurance at eInfochips

We are currently using SonarQube for other languages, those of Python and Android.

At present, we make use of both the Klocwork and SonarQube tools. However, as we wish to have a combined tool, we are planning to switch to Kuiwan.

I rate Klocwork as a seven out of 10. 

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Fortify Application Defender: Python
Director of Security at Merito

The biggest complaint that I have heard concerns additional platform support because right now, it only supports applications that are written in .NET and Java. They need better support for applications written in Python or more advanced web service-type implementations. Better support for other architectures is critical.

Technical support needs to be improved.

It would be helpful to include agent deployment as part of the Azure DevOps marketplace. This would make it really easy for customers to get this plugin and install it within their application centers.

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WhiteSource: Python
Co Founder at a consumer goods company with 11-50 employees

WhiteSource Prioritize should be expanded to cover more than Java and JavaScript.
We are currently using WhiteSource Prioritize for Java and it cuts our vulnerability alerts by almost 90%. However, Prioritize doesn't cover python or other languages at this point and our developers are required to deal with many open source security alerts. The problem is that now our developers are aware that most open source security alerts are not impacting the security of their applications and it's harder to get their cooperation. We are waiting for WhiteSource to announce support ifor Python and other languages.

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Sonatype Nexus Firewall: Python
UJ
Senior Cyber Security Architect and Engineer at a computer software company with 10,001+ employees

With the security concerns around open source, the management and vulnerability scanning, it's relatively new. In today's world more and more people are going through the open source arena and downloading code like Python, GitHub, Maven, and other external repositories. There is no way for anyone to know what our users, especially our data scientists and our developers, are downloading. We deployed Sonatype to give us the ability to see if these codes are vulnerable or not. Our Python users and our developers use Sonatype to download their repositories.

Given the confidentiality of our customer, we keep everything on-prem. We have four instances of Sonatype running, two Nexus Repositories and two IQ Servers, and they're both HA. If one goes down, then all the data will be replicated automatically.

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Sonatype Nexus Lifecycle: Python
Enterprise Infrastrcture Architect at Qrypt

We have a few applications that we're developing that use several different languages. The first ones we did were Python and Yum Repository applications. Recently we've started scanning C and C++ applications that use Conan Package Manager. We will soon start doing node applications with NPM. Our use case is that we primarily rely on the IQ server to ensure we don't have open source dependencies in our applications that have security vulnerabilities, and to ensure that they're not using licenses our general counsel wants us to avoid using.

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RS
Senior Architect at a insurance company with 1,001-5,000 employees

We use Nexus as a local repository of both JavaScript and Java components, and we're starting to look at Python. We also connected up to the Nexus Firewall, so that new components that are proxied are looked at to see if they have malicious components or if they are components without vulnerabilities. We're able to establish policies about whether we want to allow those or quarantine them. 

Our main use case for IQ Server is to scan software builds for components with existing vulnerabilities and malicious components. We're working to drive down our technical debt due to components with known issues, and it's been helpful. We're still expanding the program to different software languages. We started with Java and then extended the JavaScript. We want to extend to Python, but we're not quite there yet. We don't have too many Python users, so that's less of a priority.

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Snyk: Python
Information Security Officer at a tech services company with 51-200 employees

The dependency checks of the libraries are very valuable, but the licensing part is also very important because, with open source components, licensing can be all over the place. Our project is not an open source project, but we do use quite a lot of open source components and we want to make sure that we don't have surprises in there. That's something that we pay attention to.

The ease of use for developers is quite straightforward. They've got good documentation. It depends on the language that you use for development, but for what we have — Java, JavaScript, Python — it seems to be pretty straightforward.

It also has good integration with CI/CD pipelines. In the past we had it integrated with Concourse and now it's running on Jenkins, so it seems to be quite versatile.

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RD
VP of Engineering at a tech vendor with 11-50 employees

The core offering of reporting across multiple projects and being able to build that into our build-pipelines, so that we know very early on if we've got any issues with dependencies, is really useful.

We're loving some of the Kubernetes integration as well. That's really quite cool. It's still in the early days of our use of it, but it looks really exciting. In the Kubernetes world, it's very good at reporting on the areas around the configuration of your platform, rather than the things that you've pulled in. There's some good advice there that allows you to prioritize whether something is important or just worrying. That's very helpful.

In terms of actionable items, we've found that when you're taking a container that has been built from a standard operating system, it tends to be riddled with vulnerabilities. It's more akin to trying to persuade you to go for something simpler, whether that's a scratch or an Alpine container, which has less in it. It's more a nudge philosophy, rather than a specific, actionable item.

We have integrated Snyk into our software development environment. The way Snyk works is that, as you build the software in your pipelines, you can have a Snyk test run at that point, and it will tell you if there are newly-discovered vulnerabilities or if you've introduced vulnerabilities into your software. And you can have it block builds if you want it to. Our integrations were mostly a language-based decision. We have Snyk integrated with Python, JavaScript Node, and TouchScript code, among others, as well as Kubernetes. It's very powerful and gives us very good coverage on all of those languages. That's very positive indeed.

We've got 320-something projects — those are the different packages that use Snyk. It could generate 1,000 or 2,000 vulnerabilities, or possibly even more than that, most of which we can't do anything about, and most of which aren't in areas that are particularly sensitive to us. One of our focuses in using Snyk — and we've done this recently with some of the new services that they have offered — is to partition things. We have product code and we have support tools and test tools. By focusing on the product code as the most important, that allows us to scope down and look at the rest of the information less frequently, because it's less important, less vulnerable.

From a fixing-of-vulnerabilities perspective, often Snyk will recommend just upgrading a library version, and that's clearly very easy. Some of the patching tools are a little more complicated to use. We're a little bit more sensitive about letting SaaS tools poke around in our code base. We want a little bit more sensitivity there, but it works. It's really good to be able to focus our attention in the right way. That's the key thing.

Where something is fixable, it's really easy. The reduction in the amount of time it takes to fix something is in orders of magnitude. Where there isn't a patch already available, then it doesn't make a huge amount of difference because it's just alerting us to something. So where it wins, it's hugely dramatic. And where it doesn't allow us to take action easily, then to a certain extent, it's just telling you that there are "burglaries" in your area. What do you do then? Do you lock the windows or make sure the doors are locked? It doesn't make a huge difference there.

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DD
Security Engineer at a tech vendor with 201-500 employees
  • The wide range of programming languages it covers, including Python
  • Identifying the vulnerabilities and providing information on how to fix them — remediation steps

It's very easy for developers to use. Onboarding was an easy process for all of the developers within the company. After a quick, half-an-hour to an hour session, they were fully using it on their own. It's very straightforward. Usability is definitely a 10 out of 10. Our developers are using the dashboard and command lines. All the documentation is provided and I've never had an issue.

We have integrated Snyk into our software development environment. It's something that is ongoing at the moment. Our SDE is VS Code.

Another important feature is the solution’s vulnerability database, in terms of comprehensiveness and accuracy. It's top-notch. It pulls all the data from the CVE database, the national vulnerability database. It's accurate and frequently updated.

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CISO at a tech vendor with 51-200 employees

Snyk's ability to help developers find and fix vulnerabilities quickly is pretty good. From a one to 10, it is probably a six or seven. The reason is because they make it very clear how to take the steps, but it's not necessarily in front of the developers. For instance, my role here is security, so I go and look at it all the time to see what is happening. The developer is checking code, then their analysis runs in the pipeline and they have moved on. Therefore, the developers don't necessarily get real-time feedback and take action until someone else reviews it, like me, to know if there is a problem that they need to go address.

Snyk does a good job finding applications, but that is not in front of the developers. We are still spending time to make it a priority for them. So, it's not really saving time, e.g., the developers are catching something before it goes into Snyk's pipeline.

A criticism I would have of the product is it's very hierarchical. I would rate the container security feature as a seven or eight (out of 10). It lists projects. So, if you have a number of microservices in an enterprise, then you could have pages of findings. Developers will then spend zero time going through the pages of reports to figure out, "Is there something I need to fix?" While it may make sense to list all the projects and issues in these very long lists for completeness, Snyk could do a better job of bubbling up and grouping items, e.g., a higher level dashboard that draws attention to things that are new, the highest priority things, or things trending in the wrong direction. That would make it a lot easier. They don't quite have that yet in container security.

One area that I would love to see more coverage of is .NET. We primarily use JavaScript and TypeScript, and Snyk does a great job with those. One of the things that we are doing as a microservices developer is we want to be able to develop in any language that our developers want, which is a unique problem for a tool like this because they specialize. As we grow, we see interest in Python, and while Snyk has some Python coverage that is pretty good, it is not as mature. For other languages, while it's present, it is also not very mature yet. This is an area for improvement because there was a very straightforward way that they integrated everything for Node.js. However, as other languages like Rust and .NET gain popularity, we may just have one very critical service in 200 that uses something else, and I would like to see this same level of attestation across them.

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Contrast Security Assess: Python
SW
Senior Customer Success Manager at a tech company with 201-500 employees

A good use case is a development team with an established DevOps process. The Assess product natively integrates into developer workflows to deliver immediate results. Highly accurate vulnerability findings are available at the same time as functional /regression testing results. There is no wait for time-consuming static scans.

Assess works with several languages, including Java and .NET, which are common in enterprise environments, as well as Node.JS, Ruby and Python

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